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How children lost the right to roam in four generations
Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 15th June 2007 | DAVID DERBYSHIRE

Posted on 06/22/2007 11:43:38 AM PDT by fgoodwin

How children lost the right to roam in four generations

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=462091
http://tinyurl.com/yt6geg

By DAVID DERBYSHIRE

Last updated at 01:03am on 15th June 2007

When George Thomas was eight he walked everywhere.

It was 1926 and his parents were unable to afford the fare for a tram, let alone the cost of a bike and he regularly walked six miles to his favourite fishing haunt without adult supervision.

Fast forward to 2007 and Mr Thomas's eight-year-old great-grandson Edward enjoys none of that freedom.

He is driven the few minutes to school, is taken by car to a safe place to ride his bike and can roam no more than 300 yards from home.

Even if he wanted to play outdoors, none of his friends strays from their home or garden unsupervised.

The contrast between Edward and George's childhoods is highlighted in a report which warns that the mental health of 21st-century children is at risk because they are missing out on the exposure to the natural world enjoyed by past generations.

The report says the change in attitudes is reflected in four generations of the Thomas family in Sheffield.

The oldest member, George, was allowed to roam for six miles from home unaccompanied when he was eight.

His home was tiny and crowded and he spent most of his time outside, playing games and making dens.

Mr Thomas, who went on to become a carpenter, has never lost some of the habits picked up as a child and, aged 88, is still a keen walker.

His son-in-law, Jack Hattersley, 63, was also given freedom to roam.

He was aged eight in 1950, and was allowed to walk for about one mile on his own to the local woods. Again, he walked to school and never travelled by car.

By 1979, when his daughter Vicky Grant was eight, there were signs that children's independence was being eroded.

"I was able to go out quite freely - I'd ride my bike around the estate, play with friends in the park and walk to the swimming pool and to school," said Mrs Grant, 36.

"There was a lot less traffic then - and families had only one car. People didn't make all these short journeys."

Today, her son Edward spends little time on his own outside his garden in their quiet suburban street. She takes him by car to school to ensure she gets to her part-time job as a medical librarian on time.

While he enjoys piano lessons, cubs, skiing lessons, regular holidays and the trampoline, slide and climbing frame in the garden, his mother is concerned he may be missing out.

She said: "He can go out in the crescent but he doesn't tend to go out because the other children don't. We put a bike in the car and go off to the country where we can all cycle together.

"It's not just about time. Traffic is an important consideration, as is the fear of abduction, but I'm not sure whether that's real or perceived."

She added: "Over four generations our family is poles apart in terms of affluence. But I'm not sure our lives are any richer."

The report's author, Dr William Bird, the health adviser to Natural England and the organiser of a conference on nature and health on Monday, believes children's long-term mental health is at risk.

He has compiled evidence that people are healthier and better adjusted if they get out into the countryside, parks or gardens.

Stress levels fall within minutes of seeing green spaces, he says. Even filling a home with flowers and plants can improve concentration and lower stress.

"If children haven't had contact with nature, they never develop a relationship with natural environment and they are unable to use it to cope with stress," he said.

"Studies have shown that people deprived of contact with nature were at greater risk of depression and anxiety. Children are getting less and less unsupervised time in the natural environment.

"They need time playing in the countryside, in parks and in gardens where they can explore, dig up the ground and build dens."

The report, published by Natural England and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, also found that children's behaviour and school work improve if their playground has grassy areas, ponds and trees.

It also found evidence that hospital patients need fewer painkillers after surgery if they have views of nature from their bed.


TOPICS: Education; History; Outdoors; Society
KEYWORDS: childhood; kids; nannystate; outdoors; outside; parentalfear; play; playtime; strangerdanger

1 posted on 06/22/2007 11:43:42 AM PDT by fgoodwin
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To: fgoodwin

I roamed everywhere when I was a kid. My kids didn’t get to do that.

It happened in one generation.


2 posted on 06/22/2007 11:53:42 AM PDT by Rb ver. 2.0 (The Republican party of today is the Whig party of 1856.)
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To: fgoodwin

I roam on FR...


3 posted on 06/22/2007 11:55:36 AM PDT by Redcitizen (Grond! Grond! Grond!)
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To: Rb ver. 2.0

I remember heading out to the woods to build forts with my friends. I was about 8 years old. My daughter is 9. I am terrified if she is out of sight for even a few minutes without adult supervision.


4 posted on 06/22/2007 11:56:11 AM PDT by madprof98 ("moritur et ridet" - salvianus)
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To: madprof98
I am terrified if she is out of sight for even a few minutes without adult supervision.

You think that the media has something to do with your fear?

It's my understanding that crimes like child kidnapping etc are no higher today then in the past. Just nationally reported these days.

5 posted on 06/22/2007 11:58:24 AM PDT by Dinsdale
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To: fgoodwin

Being born in 64 I had a great deal of freedom as a kid. Up until is was about 8 years old we lived in one of those patches of private property in the middle of some state land. When I was 6 I got bit by a small massasauga rattlesnake when I was looking under rocks and logs.

When we did move to town it was just a tiny village where all the kids ran wild. From town I walked the 4 miles down the old railroad bed to the lake for fishing. When I was about 10, myself and a few of the other kids my age would go camping in the woods outside town by ourselves.


6 posted on 06/22/2007 11:59:13 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Greed is NOT a conservative ideal.)
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To: Dinsdale

Probably we do know more about crimes against children because of the media reports, but I really suspect there are more people who would commit such crimes than there were in past also. It strikes me that their behavior is fueled by the ready availability of child pornography. Certainly there is a connection between the two right here in our (otherwise very crime-free) little town. The police do a regular sting operation that lures child predators here. Many of those apprehended have been regarded as respectable citizens, but most have been found to have been accessing child porn on their computers.


7 posted on 06/22/2007 12:04:04 PM PDT by madprof98 ("moritur et ridet" - salvianus)
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To: fgoodwin
I think probably the biggest culprits are .... houses with a big garage door where the front porch used to be.

People drive into their garages, go inside from the garage, and rarely stray outside after that. And if they do, the only place for them to go is their fenced-off back yards.

As a result, many subdivision-dwellers don't know their neighbors.

And, of course, there's the "ninny state" effect at work, too. Parents want to protect their kids from all sorts of monsters -- some that are real, of course, but many that are not.

8 posted on 06/22/2007 12:04:56 PM PDT by r9etb
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To: Redcitizen

Lol!


9 posted on 06/22/2007 12:09:47 PM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: fgoodwin
We didn't have the Internet, MTV, and inter-active video games 'back in MY day'.

Todays y'ut doesn't WANT to roam; would rather sit inside and become big flat fannys with two blood-shot eyeballs...

10 posted on 06/22/2007 12:12:17 PM PDT by GoldCountryRedneck ("Flying is like Life: Know where you are, where you're going, and how to get there." - 'Ol Dad)
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To: Dinsdale

I have in my neighborhood 8 convicted sexual predators. There have been two drive-by shootings since I have lived here. No way do I allow my kids out.The perception is pretty much based on reality here.


11 posted on 06/22/2007 12:12:29 PM PDT by voiceinthewind
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To: madprof98

My youth up till age 12 was spent in New Orleans. Used to roam the west bank river levee with my friends from Algiers to Belle Chase. We’d also ride our bikes to the ferry and hit the French Quarter for the day. A couple of eleven year olds on Bourbon street was quite an educational experience in the early 70’s.


12 posted on 06/22/2007 12:13:52 PM PDT by Rb ver. 2.0 (The Republican party of today is the Whig party of 1856.)
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To: r9etb

Yes, there’s a lot of truth in what you said. Another reason might be that people are having fewer kids these days, and “helicopter-ing” over them a lot more.


13 posted on 06/22/2007 12:13:53 PM PDT by CarrotAndStick (The articles posted by me needn't necessarily reflect my opinion.)
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To: madprof98
I'm going to have to disagree unless someone can produce some evidence.

My interpretation is that they were always pervs. Now they are busted pervs thanks to the internet.

Remember that many of the cases of child molestation by priests/preachers etc occurred during times that we remember as being 'safe'. Turns out they were not so much safe as covered up. Respectable citizens indeed.

14 posted on 06/22/2007 12:15:14 PM PDT by Dinsdale
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To: voiceinthewind
How many sexual predators were around you as a kid?

You don't know as their was no way to find out at the time.

Remember that frightened people are easy to manipulate. Their are groups of people that like you scared all the time.

15 posted on 06/22/2007 12:18:53 PM PDT by Dinsdale
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To: Rb ver. 2.0
It happened in one generation.

Absolutely...

16 posted on 06/22/2007 12:24:17 PM PDT by johnny7 ("But that one on the far left... he had crazy eyes")
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To: Dinsdale

My great grandmother once told me about a child rapist / murderer caught near where she lived in northern michigan in the early part of the last century. She made a cryptic comment about some of the local fathers taking him on a tour of the steel mill in the middle of the night and he never came back to town.


17 posted on 06/22/2007 12:28:19 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Greed is NOT a conservative ideal.)
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To: fgoodwin
I remember thinking how embarrassingly overprotective my mom was. Yet, at 13 I was able to take the city bus almost anywhere. When I told a young man who is 15 years younger than me he thought that was very different.

In comparison to my mom I am more overprotective. My kids aren't embarrassed by it, since I don't go around announcing it to their friends.

18 posted on 06/22/2007 12:29:52 PM PDT by HungarianGypsy
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To: r9etb

Honestly, I don’t want to know my particular neighbors. We have a chain link fence in our backyard. My next door neighbor is always asking, “Why aren’t you out more?” Just because I’m not out on his schedule does not mean I’m not out.


19 posted on 06/22/2007 12:32:21 PM PDT by HungarianGypsy
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To: cripplecreek
Sounds like the guy whose mother was thrown into the insane asylum with a bunch of male psychos and 9 mos later spawned a horrible man who as an adult committed unspeakable acts. He roamed the town wearing a glove where each finger was a razor sharp knife.

The towns folks caught him and set him on fire.

He came back in the dreams of their children"....One two Freddys comin for you..three four better shut your door...five six grab a crucifix...seven eight gonna stay up late...nine ten never sleep again.."

20 posted on 06/22/2007 12:39:50 PM PDT by nativist (Weigh into them!)
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To: Rb ver. 2.0

I think the independence factor is the issue, not necessarily exposure to rocks and rills. My uppermost priority in childhood was to go off to see the world on my own, even just to roller skate at six years of age blocks beyond my “boundary” in Queens (NY). I was a tiny little girl and Mom was a micromanager. I just could not stand it!

New Orleans was the second city I was allowed to explore on my own. I loved its murky strangeness. My grandmother lived there in the Garden District and we visited every Easter vacation. I was FINALLY allowed to wander the Quarter by myself at age 12, though I wanted to slip my moorings much earlier. The year before, at 11, I got to prowl around San Francisco, where we stayed in the St. Francis Hotel in 1947. My mother was pregnant and I wasn’t about to hang around the hotel all day. The doorman pointed me toward Chinatown: “Walk uphill, and walk downhill to get back to the hotel.”

It wasn’t all that different in the sixties when my kids grew up on the beach between Santa Monica and Marina del Rey. We lived in the Marina and they walked or biked to SamoHi every day. There were some bad characters then, but self-destructive hippie druggies were relatively harmless to others. Now, of course, an adult would be crazy to walk that beach alone without two Dobermans and an Uzi.

I spent a few delightful years as a travel writer, with assignments all over the world. Both of my kids headed to foreign shores the minute they left school. I’m seriously ticked that so many countries are so dangerous for Americans now, and even more ticked that I seem to look like an easy target at my allegedly advanced age. @#$#&(*& to THAT!


21 posted on 06/22/2007 12:47:39 PM PDT by Veto! (Opinions freely dispensed as advice)
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To: windcliff

ping


22 posted on 06/22/2007 1:45:50 PM PDT by stylecouncilor (I'm a loner Dottie; a rebel.)
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To: fgoodwin

Four? More like one generation!


23 posted on 06/22/2007 1:49:57 PM PDT by Clam Digger (Donate to the RNC - in pesos.)
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To: stylecouncilor

How true—it was just one generation.


24 posted on 06/22/2007 2:00:38 PM PDT by windcliff
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To: fgoodwin

That may be very true for these ever expanding city urban types. But there are also many country kids, go look at the blue states by county map... and we’re always out doors and doing stuff. BTW I was born in 85, so I’m not talking about some previous generation. But I know others from college who came from Chicago and such and they have spent all their lives in condos and downtown neon worlds. But I think that it’s more a symptom of population concentration than generational differences.


25 posted on 06/22/2007 2:14:52 PM PDT by RachelFaith
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To: fgoodwin

I consider myself very lucky, in that we live on a USMC base. My children are, for the most part, safe to roam and run outside whenever they choose. Too bad it’s too dang hot lately. It is also a neighborhood where there are few who are afraid to come outside and greet their neighbors and chat over the back fence, so to speak.

One of my favorite things about being a military family is the sense of community that living on base gives me. My children seem to have a more “normal” after-school existence, because they are able to run and play in a safe environment, in addition to the fact that I know a majority of my neighbors. As a result, I have never felt the need to over-extend them with arranged activities. We also have a great youth center here on base (within walking distance) that they can play at when it gets too hot (110 here at 4pm).


26 posted on 06/22/2007 4:13:08 PM PDT by USMCWife6869 (Godspeed Sand Sharks.)
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To: Dinsdale

Growing up in the citrus belt in Florida I was walking several blocks to visit a friend in my rural neighborhood in 1965. A car pulls beside me, pushes the car door open an offers me a ‘ride’. Had a car not come over the hill (very rare) in the opposite direction, causing the pedophile to speed off, who knows what may have happened.

There have always been perverts. We are just more aware of them now. (and probably know one or two)


27 posted on 06/23/2007 4:26:39 AM PDT by poobear (Pure democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what's for dinner. God save the Republic!)
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To: AdmSmith; Berosus; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Fred Nerks; KlueLass; ...
The contrast between Edward and George's childhoods is highlighted in a report which warns that the mental health of 21st-century children is at risk because they are missing out on the exposure to the natural world enjoyed by past generations.
Gosh, this wouldn't be an attack on private property er anythin', would it? Kids plant their little asses in front of the idiot box (used to refer to TV, now includes computer gaming machines) and never read a book for the same reason they don't go outside -- no action.
28 posted on 06/23/2007 6:57:31 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated June 20, 2007.)
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Report: Corvallis teen accused of sexually abusing horse
Oregonlive | June 15, 2007 05:34AM | Associated Press
Posted on 06/15/2007 3:19:58 PM EDT by MovementConservative
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1850922/posts


29 posted on 06/23/2007 7:43:47 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (Time heals all wounds, particularly when they're not yours. Profile updated June 20, 2007.)
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