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Cameron Macauley The Boy Who Lived Before
Extraordinatry Children ^ | july 15th, 2007 | DancesWithCats

Posted on 07/16/2007 3:43:04 PM PDT by DancesWithCats

Ever since he was two years old and first started talking, Cameron Macauley has told of his life on the island of Barra. Cameron lives with his mum, Norma, in Glasgow. They have never been to Barra.

He tells of a white house, overlooking the sea and the beach, where he would play with his brothers and sisters. He tells of the airplanes that used to land on the beach. He talks about his dog, a black and white dog.

Barra lies off the western coast of Scotland, 220 miles from Glasgow. It can only be reached by a lengthy sea journey or an hour long flight. It is a, distant, outpost of the British Isles and is home to just over a thousand people.

Cameron is now five, and his story has never wavered. He talks incessantly about his Barra family, his Barra mum and Barra dad. His Barra dad he explains was called Shane Robertson and he died when he was knocked down by a car.

He has become so preoccupied with Barra and is missing his Barra mum so badly that he is now suffering from genuine distress.

Norma considers herself to be open-minded, and would like to find out if there is any rational explanation for Cameron's memories and beliefs that he was previously a member of another family on Barra. Her first port of call is Dr. Chris French, a psychologist who edits The Skeptic magazine which debunks paranormal phenomena. Not surprisingly, he discounts any talk of reincarnation mooting that a child's over-active imagination can be fed by the multitude of television programmes available and the easy access to the Web. Norma is not convinced, she does not believe that Cameron has ever watched programmes that could have provided this information.

(Excerpt) Read more at mymultiplesclerosis.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Miscellaneous; Society; Weird Stuff
KEYWORDS: afterlife; barra; boy; cameronmacauley; reincarnation; scotland; shanerobertson; skepticultists; spirit
Now, I do not believe in reincarnation. I don't believe in ghosts and spirits, nor do I believe in elves or gnomes either. And if this were an adult telling us this tale of what had happened to them, I'd be saying, 'yeah. right. sure' but when a child comes up with this story? For years? Then I wonder about it. Unless mom is just a big fat lier and told the boy to tell these tales. But with a child? The truth usually spills all out ... 'and then mom said to say this or that ...' so it does make me wonder. What do y'all think about this ?
1 posted on 07/16/2007 3:43:05 PM PDT by DancesWithCats
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To: DancesWithCats

... liar ... sorry about the misspell!


2 posted on 07/16/2007 3:45:31 PM PDT by DancesWithCats
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To: DancesWithCats

How interesting. I have to wonder, who are the witnesses to his telling this story at age 2? I’ve been throught the Twos seven times; their communication skills are underwhelming.

Now a five-year-old could easily make this whole thing up, especially if he saw something in a movie, TV show, or book that captured his imagination. My five-year-old plans to move to Jupiter and make everyone there speak Greek.

My suggestions are either that his mother has told him stories which he has come to believe are true (very easily done with young children), or that he has made up a story, perhaps based on fiction, that he believes is true.

It’s interesting that he had a dad in his “past life” story, while he doesn’t seem to have one in reality.


3 posted on 07/16/2007 3:49:52 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Tax-chick
How interesting. I have to wonder, who are the witnesses to his telling this story at age 2? I’ve been throught the Twos seven times; their communication skills are underwhelming. Now a five-year-old could easily make this whole thing up, especially if he saw something in a movie, TV show, or book that captured his imagination. My five-year-old plans to move to Jupiter and make everyone there speak Greek. My suggestions are either that his mother has told him stories which he has come to believe are true (very easily done with young children), or that he has made up a story, perhaps based on fiction, that he believes is true. It’s interesting that he had a dad in his “past life” story, while he doesn’t seem to have one in reality.

Yes, that would be my thought, too. That mom began very early to teach him this 'story' and she knew bits and pieces herself were true ... but it seems awful far-fetched. Over a 3 year period? Still ... people will do some odd things to keep themselves amused. Anything is possible.

4 posted on 07/16/2007 3:55:09 PM PDT by DancesWithCats
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To: DancesWithCats
There is this little American boy who remembers being a pilot shot down during WWII in the Pacific. He started babbling about this very early and would come up with names of people and names of parts of his plane that there was just no way he’d know. Some of the airplane parts were unique to that era. He kept this up for a few years but as he got older he mentioned it less and less. When the story was put out a lot of people on FR thought he must have memorized tv shows. But the parents had said the kid was so young during this he was not watching historical shows or anything else that would be so accurate. The person he claimed to be really did die there as did another pilot or two he also named. Creepyville indeed.
5 posted on 07/16/2007 3:57:56 PM PDT by A knight without armor
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To: DancesWithCats

Maybe he has had a babysitter, grandmother, aunt, or something, who has told him stories that he has assimilated as true. Young children have virtually NO ability to sort truth from fiction.

A child’s longing for a father is very intense, and could result into his latching on to this narrative as a fixation. I don’t know what has really happened here, but there are a variety of possibilities for this boy to have acquired his belief in the story without anyone’s intending to upset him.


6 posted on 07/16/2007 4:03:46 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: DancesWithCats

I tend to believe some of these stories. Perhaps some of the details get scrambled, like a dream.

I don’t know but when I was young I experienced some really weird deja-vu episodes when visiting places that I had never been to before. Kinda creepy.


7 posted on 07/16/2007 4:06:57 PM PDT by FReepapalooza
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To: A knight without armor
But the parents had said the kid was so young during this he was not watching historical shows or anything else that would be so accurate.

Again, the kicker is "the parents said ...".

When my oldest daughter was a toddler, she watched CNN and the History Channel. She remembered enough information from different shows that she recognized Audie Murphy's picture when we visited a museum exhibit about him, and she was able (at around three, early talker!) to discuss why he was famous.

8 posted on 07/16/2007 4:07:05 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Tax-chick

Maybe this is one of those by proxy syndromes where the parent is sick and seeking attention by setting the kid up. With everything else in life I can’t imagine throwing this much energy and time into a stupid scam that takes years to pull off.


9 posted on 07/16/2007 4:13:48 PM PDT by A knight without armor
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To: DancesWithCats
Yes, that would be my thought, too.

"At the University of Virginia, a department has been set up to investigate these stories."

A Department !!! You must think the folks at UVa are either stupid or naive.

ML/NJ

10 posted on 07/16/2007 4:17:12 PM PDT by ml/nj
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To: A knight without armor
Maybe this is one of those by proxy syndromes where the parent is sick and seeking attention by setting the kid up.

That's a possibility. Without more information, we have no way of knowing how this particular story, names and place and detail, was transmitted to the boy.

With everything else in life I can’t imagine throwing this much energy and time into a stupid scam that takes years to pull off.

Single moms on welfare have a lot of spare time. We don't know for sure that this is the situation here, but it seems to be an absolute majority of "families" in the UK these days.

I would still be inclined to believe that it's an innocent misunderstanding of some information that he's acquired, simply because it's so mean to deliberately upset a child in this way.

11 posted on 07/16/2007 4:23:32 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: DancesWithCats

He’s channeling Bridey Murphy.

http://skepdic.com/bridey.html


12 posted on 07/16/2007 4:23:55 PM PDT by dynachrome (Henry Bowman is right.)
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To: ml/nj

They probably mean a grant-funded study group of some sort, under the psychology department.


13 posted on 07/16/2007 4:24:35 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: A knight without armor
When the story was put out a lot of people on FR thought he must have memorized tv shows. But the parents had said the kid was so young during this he was not watching historical shows or anything else that would be so accurate. The person he claimed to be really did die there as did another pilot or two he also named. Creepyville indeed.

But maybe when he was in preschool they watched some historical shows? Or discussed some stories out of books? Or when he was being watched by others? Odd ... but I'm certain that there is a logical explanation for it. I just don't believe in anyone having lived a 'former life'. Had a boyfriend once who on the second (and last) date told me that he believed himself to be reincarnated from an ancient Roman captain ... hit the Date Auto Eject!!! LOL I immediately said 'you're talking to a total nonbeliever'. We parted friends but that was the last of the heart to heart discussions!

14 posted on 07/16/2007 4:25:45 PM PDT by DancesWithCats
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To: dynachrome
t is indicative of the typical lowering of the standards of critical thinking when it comes to belief in the supernatural that defenders of preposterous stories such as this one find easily accessible information to be incontrovertible proof of their veracity.

For example, Tighe talks about kissing the Blarney stone and knew that the act requires the assistance of someone who holds you as you lean backwards and face up to kiss the stone. This is common knowledge and photos of this are available in hundreds of sources, yet this fact has been cited as strong evidence that Tighe really kissed the stone in a previous incarnation

Yes! See? Blarney-Babble.

15 posted on 07/16/2007 4:30:46 PM PDT by DancesWithCats
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To: DancesWithCats

Maybe “Blarney Rubble”, Fred Flintsone’s friend. ;)


16 posted on 07/16/2007 4:39:17 PM PDT by dynachrome (Henry Bowman is right.)
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To: DancesWithCats
Had a boyfriend once who on the second (and last) date told me that he believed himself to be reincarnated from an ancient Roman captain ...

You notice they're always reincarnated from someone notable, never a stable slave or washerwoman.

17 posted on 07/16/2007 4:39:17 PM PDT by Scothia ( When something important is going on, silence is a lie.)
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To: Scothia; DancesWithCats

Or one of the 50% of children (historically) who died before age 10.


18 posted on 07/16/2007 4:41:10 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: DancesWithCats
"Had a boyfriend once who on the second (and last) date told me that he believed himself to be reincarnated from an ancient Roman captain ... hit the Date Auto Eject!!! LOL I immediately said 'you're talking to a total nonbeliever'. We parted friends but that was the last of the heart to heart discussions."

I had a girlfriend in college who was a big believer in this stuff. She now teaches yoga out in Berkeley, CA. She ended up marrying a man she claimed to have been married to in past lives.

They got divorced in this one.

I thought it was telling in this story that when the historical records were checked, the kid's story didn't hold up.

19 posted on 07/16/2007 4:43:13 PM PDT by Volunteer (Just so you know, I am ashamed the Dixie Chicks make records in Nashville.)
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To: Tax-chick
They probably mean a grant-funded study group of some sort, under the psychology department.

Why don't you find out and report back. My experience with the folks in Charlottesville is that they don't bother with anything frivolous.

ML/NJ

20 posted on 07/16/2007 5:18:33 PM PDT by ml/nj
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To: ml/nj
Dr. Jim Tucker: Assistant Professor: Division of Personality Studies, Department of Psychiatric Medicine, University of Virginia Health System. 1999 - Present.

"Division of Personality Studies" does the "past-life" evaluations, and one can certainly see how that is relevant to Psychiatry.

Although a British source couldn't be expected to sort out the details, "University of Virginia Health System" is a separate entity from "University of Virginia" as a educational institution. Nonetheless, iirc, UVa is not immune from the "Goofball Studies" trend that afflicts most large public universities, however good their programs are in the aggregate.

21 posted on 07/16/2007 5:58:03 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Tax-chick
UVa is not immune from the "Goofball Studies" trend that afflicts most large public universities

Do you know this, or do you assume this? Maybe you could cite at least one "goofball study," that was done at UVa. My experience down there includes interaction with dozens of professors. Sure, I've disagreed with a number about some things, but I never had the impression that any that I have interacted with were Space Cadets or charlatans.

ML/NJ

22 posted on 07/16/2007 6:05:38 PM PDT by ml/nj
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To: ml/nj

Here’s an example of what I mean by “Goofball Studies”:

http://www.virginia.edu/womenstudies/home.htm

Women’s Studies, Black Studies, Queer Studies, blah blah blah.

I agree that UVa is an excellent university. However, if you went through their records, I’m sure you’d find they have professors getting grants to study nutso stuff in various departments. That’s how the government grant system works!


23 posted on 07/16/2007 6:11:31 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Tax-chick
However, if you went through their records

I was asking you if you had done this, and to provide an example. Is that unreasonable?

When I have visited UVa, I have mined their catalog for classes I might like to sit in on. I have also done the same thing at one of the Ivys, because these are the places my kids went. (I'm sure I've sat in on, and participated in, 60+ classes by now.) I can assure you that UVa, while it does offer a number of ridiculous classes, the overall proportion of ridiculous classes at the school is so low as to be virtually unnoticeable.

BTW this Tucker guy has a regular UVa email address and apparently a six figure salary.

ML/NJ

24 posted on 07/16/2007 6:29:11 PM PDT by ml/nj
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To: ml/nj

I just pulled up the site for “Women and Gender Studies.”

Quod Erat Demonstrandum, they’ve got some Goofballery.

I’m not saying Dr. Tucker isn’t doing legitimate research. However, his “Division of Personality Studies” is not a “Department” at the University of Virginia devoted to “reincarnation” cases.


25 posted on 07/16/2007 6:35:44 PM PDT by Tax-chick ("A dependence on mass immigration is always a structural weakness and should be understood as such.")
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To: Scothia

I believe I was reincarnated from a stud horse.


26 posted on 07/16/2007 6:54:19 PM PDT by Stallone (War with Iran - While Bush is President and Troops are Present.)
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Twenty Cases Suggestive of Reincarnation: Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged Other Lives, Other Selves: A Jungian Psychotherapist Discovers Past Lives
Twenty Cases Suggestive of Reincarnation:
Second Edition, Revised and Enlarged

by Ian Stevenson
Other Lives, Other Selves:
A Jungian Psychotherapist
Discovers Past Lives

by Roger J. Woolger, PhD.


27 posted on 07/16/2007 11:11:45 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Profile updated Friday the 13th, July 2007. Trisdecaphobia! https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: Tax-chick
More about Tucker's work

ML/NJ

28 posted on 07/17/2007 2:57:46 AM PDT by ml/nj
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