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Duty. Honor. Confederacy.
The Charlotte Post ^ | July 24, 2008 | Kimberly Harrington

Posted on 07/27/2008 7:52:45 AM PDT by cowboyway

MONROE – At first glance, it’s an unlikely combination. A black family seated under a tent facing a line of Civil War re-enactors, proudly holding Confederate flags and gripping their weapons.

But what lies between these two groups is what brought them together: An unmarked grave about to get its due, belonging to a slave who fought for the Confederacy.

Weary Clyburn was best friends with his master’s son, Frank. When Frank left the plantation to fight in the Civil War, Clyburn followed him.

He fought alongside Frank and even saved his life on two occasions.

On July 18, the city of Monroe proclaimed Weary Clyburn Day; an event that coincided with the Sons of Confederate Veterans convention in Concord.

The N.C. Division of Sons of Confederate Veterans (James Miller Camp 2116) honored Clyburn, who died March 30, 1930, with a memorial program at Hillcrest Cemetery in Monroe and unveiled a new headstone for his unmarked grave.

“It’s an honor to find out we have a gentleman who served ... with loyalty and devotion to his friend,” said Commander Michael Chapman of the local SCV chapter.

“I’m happy to be here. It’s a glorious day,” said Mary Elizabeth Clyburn Hooks of New Jersey. “I just think it’s beautiful these people chose to celebrate my grandfather’s bravery and courage. It’s just overwhelming.”

Missing from the event was the woman who helped bring the pieces together, Mattie Clyburn Rice of High Point, who remembered the stories her father shared with her as a child.

Rice was hospitalized the morning of the ceremony.

Rice remembered being at her father’s funeral, said Earl Ijames, a curator at the N.C. Office of Archives and History. “He told her stories, and being able to verify those stories brought this event together,” he said.

Ijames met Rice when she was at the state Archives Office looking for her birth certificate in August 2005. She was in the wrong department and he struck up a conversation with her. Ijames asked Rice her name and upon hearing Clyburn, asked if she had ever heard of Weary Clyburn.

“She looked straight at me and said, ‘That’s my daddy,’“ he said.

Ijames has been researching “colored Confederates” for the past 14 years. According to Rice, he said, Clyburn’s father sharecropped and painted after the war. He moved from Lancaster County, S.C., and eventually settled in Union County. Rice moved away but relocated to North Carolina three years ago to take care of her nephew.

An impressive crowd gathered at the gravesite to pay tribute to Weary Clyburn. Civil War re-enactors, dressed in full regalia, came from overseas and states as far away as California and Pennsylvania to the program.

“We’re here to honor Weary Clyburn, but really, the honor is ours,” said N.C. SCV Commander Tom Smith. “The Sons of Confederate Veterans honors our own and he’s one of our own. We need to do more of what we’re doing now."

Weary Clyburn was one of thousands of slaves who served in the Confederate Army, Ijames said. There’s no way to quantify the number of slaves who served. “But it’s in the thousands, easy.”

People today often wonder why slaves fought for the Confederacy. Ijames said the only course they had to freedom was through the Confederate Army. “Why not go and defend what they know versus running away and going to the unknown,” Ijames said. “A lot of us automatically assume the war started to free slaves. That’s not true. It was a war to preserve the Union as the way it was.”

Slaves were not allowed to fight in the federal army, Ijames said. Those that made their way behind Union lines were still considered slaves.

Clyburn escaped the plantation and made his way to Columbia, S.C., where he met up with Frank in boot camp. “They were best friends,” Ijames said.

Felicia Bryant, Clyburn’s great-granddaughter, agreed. “They were really good friends and that trumped everything else.”


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Education; History
KEYWORDS: apologists; black; civilwar; confederacy; cva; dhimmitude; dixie; ntsa; scv; southron; waryclyburn; wearyclyburn
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Dixie ping!
1 posted on 07/27/2008 7:52:45 AM PDT by cowboyway
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To: cowboyway; stainlessbanner; Bat_Chemist

Dixie ping, NC ping.

This event was practically in my back yard, but I didn’t see the information in the newspaper until the day after. I should have read Friday’s newspaper on Friday!


2 posted on 07/27/2008 7:55:42 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Tax-chick's House of Herpets. Support your local reptile vet!)
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To: Tax-chick
I'm amazed that it got any coverage at all considering how totally politically incorrect this event is.

I mean, black slaves volunteering to fight for The Cause? That can't be true, can it?

3 posted on 07/27/2008 8:16:45 AM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: cowboyway

Will be back later to ping the cavalry


4 posted on 07/27/2008 8:43:14 AM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: cowboyway
... black slaves volunteering to fight for The Cause? That can't be true, can it?

Not in the fantasy world of those who have rewritten our history, no. There were no free blacks, either, and no blacks who were slaveowners. Everything's about the "white guilt" of people who probably aren't even descendants of slaveowners, at least not for a thousand years.

Our local independent weekly news, "The County Edge," put this event on the front page, but the kids took it and I didn't see it until too late. It was in the Monroe daily, too. History hasn't been changed much around here :-).

5 posted on 07/27/2008 12:19:46 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Tax-chick's House of Herpets. Support your local reptile vet!)
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To: cowboyway
People today often wonder why slaves fought for the Confederacy.

Since by definition slaves don't have a choice, perhaps they fought because they were told to?

A great many societies have used slave soldiers, with some major empires, such as the Mameluke and Ottoman, having been based on the institution for centuries.

6 posted on 07/27/2008 12:47:02 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. - A. Lincoln)
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To: cowboyway
Slaves were not allowed to fight in the federal army, Ijames said. Those that made their way behind Union lines were still considered slaves.

Curious statement.

The historical truth is that about 210,000 black men fought in the Union Army. About half were escaped or ex-slaves. Apparently these 100,000+ men weren't aware they were still considered slaves or that they weren't allowed to fight.

7 posted on 07/27/2008 12:50:27 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. - A. Lincoln)
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To: cowboyway
The worst whup’n that Custer received during “The War of Northern Aggression” happened when he made his first attempt to destroy a Confederate wagon train being escorted by an all black unit during the retreat from Richmond. The repulse so shocked Custer that he got together an over whelming force to destroy the train and succeeded only after a series of attacks.
8 posted on 07/27/2008 1:10:36 PM PDT by fella (.He that followeth after vain persons shall have poverty enough." Pv.28:19')
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To: Tax-chick
History hasn't been changed much around here :-).

I know what you mean. I lived in Lucia for about 5 years. Got a friend of mine that's been in Mt. Holly most of his life.

9 posted on 07/27/2008 1:53:58 PM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: Sherman Logan
Since by definition slaves don't have a choice, perhaps they fought because they were told to?

"Weary Clyburn was best friends with his master’s son, Frank. When Frank left the plantation to fight in the Civil War, Clyburn followed him."

"He fought alongside Frank and even saved his life on two occasions."

Typical yankee response. You guys have one version of antebellum South and that is of beatings, rape, inhumane labor, lynchings, etc.

It just doesn't fit your narrow minded views that blacks and whites were actually getting along just fine.

Answer this; once Weary was on the front lines, why didn't he run over to the yankees to be 'saved' from the terrible bondage and beatings that he must have been getting on a daily basis?

10 posted on 07/27/2008 2:00:56 PM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: Sherman Logan
The historical truth is that about 210,000 black men fought in the Union Army. About half were escaped or ex-slaves. Apparently these 100,000+ men weren't aware they were still considered slaves or that they weren't allowed to fight.

The historical truth is that the union didn't allow for the enlistment of blacks until the war was well under way and Lincoln was in a panic because things weren't going very well for the union.

The historical truth is that it took union congressional legislation to allow blacks to enlist.

11 posted on 07/27/2008 2:06:49 PM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: fella
The worst whup’n that Custer received during “The War of Northern Aggression” happened when he made his first attempt to destroy a Confederate wagon train being escorted by an all black unit during the retreat from Richmond.

Custer must have had an 'ethnic group' jinx. :~)

12 posted on 07/27/2008 2:08:35 PM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: cowboyway
You are projecting. You are taking all the things anti-southern people may have said and projecting it onto me. Try dealing with what I actually said.

Did I say he was beaten? I said he had no free choice. That's what slavery is, by definition. The removal of free choice from a human.

Perhaps the "good master" is kind and asks the slave what he would prefer to do. If so, the asking of opinion and the granting or not of the slave's wish is still the master's choice. It can be revoked at his whim with no recourse to the slave.

Even when the slave loves his master, which many down through history indisputably have, there can be no argument that their free will, the indispensable characteristic of a fully human person, has been stolen from them.

"Weary Clyburn was best friends with his master’s son, Frank.

Quite possibly a true statement, although it would have been a rare southerner who would have publicly claimed a slave or any black man as his best friend. The southern obsession with keeping them in their place was with regard to intimations of social equality, not physical contact.

When Frank left the plantation to fight in the Civil War, Clyburn followed him.

Was Weary a true volunteer? Was it possible for Weary to be a true volunteer? If Frank told him to go to war, could he decide to stay on the plantation? If Frank told him to stay home, could he decide to follow Frank anyway? Was it possible for Weary to make a free choice about anything in his life?

13 posted on 07/27/2008 2:29:07 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. - A. Lincoln)
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To: cowboyway
The historical truth is that the union didn't allow for the enlistment of blacks until the war was well under way...

And the confederacy didn't allow for the enlistment of blacks as combat troops until March 1865. Talk about too littl, too late.

The historical truth is that it took union congressional legislation to allow blacks to enlist.

No sh*t, Sherlock. All legislation is congressional legislation.

14 posted on 07/27/2008 2:34:32 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: fella
The worst whup’n that Custer received during “The War of Northern Aggression” happened when he made his first attempt to destroy a Confederate wagon train being escorted by an all black unit during the retreat from Richmond.

I'm gonna call 'Southron fairy tale' on that one. Got any details?

15 posted on 07/27/2008 2:35:42 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: cowboyway
The historical truth is that it took union congressional legislation to allow blacks to enlist.

As it did in the Confederacy.

Union legislation to this effect - July 1862.

Confederate legislation - February 1865.

At which point things weren't going very well for the confederacy. There is very thorough documentation that Confederate enlistment of black soldiers was proposed and finally accepted only as the utter last gasp of desperation.

You seem to be suffering from the common delusion that anyone who thinks the Union cause was on balance the better must also believe that cause to be one of utter and complete goodness, with no racism or other unpleasant factors mixed in. Au contraire, I am fully aware that most whites of the time, north and south, were highly racist by today's standards.

I do not demonize the South. As Lincoln himself said, if I had been in their shoes, I would have not known how to get rid of slavery either. But I wouldn't have started proclaiming a great evil to be a positive good.

The Union was simply less racist than the Confederacy because it fought a great war, one of the causes of which was slavery and one of the consequences of which was the freeing of those slaves. One of, not THE cause.

16 posted on 07/27/2008 2:44:54 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. - A. Lincoln)
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To: Non-Sequitur

Read the book “Nine April Days”.


17 posted on 07/27/2008 2:45:24 PM PDT by fella (.He that followeth after vain persons shall have poverty enough." Pv.28:19')
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To: fella
Read the book “Nine April Days”.

I've read several books on the period. The fact of the matter is that the confederacy didn't enlist more than a handful of blacks for combat duty, a few hundred at most. There weren't enough of them to give Custer, or any other Union cavalry division, their "worst whup'n" of the war.

18 posted on 07/27/2008 2:57:58 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Sherman Logan
Confederate legislation - February 1865.

It actually passed a few weeks later, on March 13, 1865.

19 posted on 07/27/2008 3:00:27 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: cowboyway

Mt. Holly is a really nice area. I’d like to move out to Gaston County, but it would be a long, long commute for my husband.


20 posted on 07/27/2008 3:02:31 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Tax-chick's House of Herpets. Support your local reptile vet!)
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To: Non-Sequitur
None so deaf as those who refuse to hear, like I said read the book. It came out during the centennial.
21 posted on 07/27/2008 3:05:27 PM PDT by fella (.He that followeth after vain persons shall have poverty enough." Pv.28:19')
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To: fella
None so deaf as those who refuse to hear...

So it would seem.

22 posted on 07/27/2008 3:06:51 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Non-Sequitur

I gave you a source it’s up to you to follow it.


23 posted on 07/27/2008 3:11:39 PM PDT by fella (.He that followeth after vain persons shall have poverty enough." Pv.28:19')
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To: Sherman Logan
although it would have been a rare southerner who would have publicly claimed a slave or any black man as his best friend.

You're projecting as if you lived 160+ years ago. All you know is the yankee revisionist history that you've swallowed.

Was Weary a true volunteer? Was it possible for Weary to be a true volunteer? If Frank told him to go to war, could he decide to stay on the plantation? If Frank told him to stay home, could he decide to follow Frank anyway? Was it possible for Weary to make a free choice about anything in his life?

Like I said earlier, you yankees have a fixed opinion of the South that will never change. That's why, even today, us local Southerners despise you damnyankee transplants.

24 posted on 07/27/2008 3:41:39 PM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: Non-Sequitur
No sh*t, Sherlock. All legislation is congressional legislation.

The point is, Watson, is that blacks weren't allowed to participate in your precious union until your precious union was on the brink of collapse. disHonest Abe and the damnyankee congress, in a panic, changed the rules to protect their financial interests and sent blacks, whom they used as tools to initiate an illegal war, to their deaths.

25 posted on 07/27/2008 3:46:27 PM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: fella
I gave you a source it’s up to you to follow it.

Forget about it. The all knowing, all seeing (and all bullshit) NS is notorious for making challenges and backing away with Obama type rhetoric when faced with facts.

26 posted on 07/27/2008 3:51:13 PM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: cowboyway
Like I said earlier, you yankees have a fixed opinion of the South that will never change.

Is that why you make no attempt to answer any of my questions?

Is it possible for any slave to be truly a volunteer? Would a southern (or, less unanimously, northern) white man of 1861 have publicly claimed a black man as his "best friend," thus implicitly assigning him status as an equal?

If you can come up with some valid answers to my questions, as opposed to non-responsive victimized rants, I'm perfectly willing to change my mind.

27 posted on 07/27/2008 4:18:55 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. - A. Lincoln)
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To: Non-Sequitur

Thank you. My source wasn’t the most scholarly. Probably listed when the bill was introduced. I do know they bitched and moaned about it in Congress for an extended period.

I recently read a book about the Confederate government during the war. Very sad reading about the last debates in early 1865. The morons would stand up and make elaborate arguments about property rights and the protection of the white race while their ship was sinking around them.

Almost as dumb as the Union slaveowners refusing to accept compensated emancipation in 1864 or 65. Surely by that time any idiot could see that slavery was going bye-bye. Might as well get some compensation. But the slaveowners were dumb to even see that.


28 posted on 07/27/2008 4:24:06 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. - A. Lincoln)
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To: Tax-chick; 100%FEDUP; 2ndMostConservativeBrdMember; ~Vor~; A2J; a4drvr; Adder; Aegedius; ...

NC *Ping*

Please FRmail Bat_Chemist if you want to be added to or removed from this North Carolina ping list.
29 posted on 07/27/2008 4:43:37 PM PDT by Bat_Chemist (Love without truth deceives. Truth without love destroys.)
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To: fella; Non-Sequitur
Here is a link to the book online. To Appomattox: Nine April Days, 1865

-btw fella I did a cursory check and did not find an account like the one you described. Perhaps you would be good enough to point out on which pages the negro confederates Custer whuppin is described.

30 posted on 07/27/2008 10:18:12 PM PDT by mac_truck ( Aide toi et dieu t aidera)
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To: mac_truck

Using your supplied link plus having dug out my dead tree copy I couldn’t find the account either. So The day and the field are yours.


31 posted on 07/28/2008 12:09:32 AM PDT by fella (.He that followeth after vain persons shall have poverty enough." Pv.28:19')
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To: cowboyway
The point is, Watson, is that blacks weren't allowed to participate in your precious union until your precious union was on the brink of collapse.

I would point out that the Union being 'on the brink of collapse' at any time during the rebellion is a figment of your imagination. Like most of you posts.

The first black regiment was raised in Kansas starting in July 1862, less than 18 months after the rebellion began. The first black unit in the rebel army was raised in March 1865, 47 months after the rebellion began. A bit of a difference, wouldn't you agree?

disHonest Abe and the damnyankee congress, in a panic, changed the rules to protect their financial interests and sent blacks, whom they used as tools to initiate an illegal war, to their deaths.

Calm down and wipe the foam off your mouth, you're becoming incoherent. "Initiate illegal war"? "In a panic"?

32 posted on 07/28/2008 4:20:00 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: fella; mac_truck
I gave you a source it’s up to you to follow it.

And thanks to mac_truck's dilligence I'll have a chance to do so. Let me get back to you once I've found the passage you've been referring to.

33 posted on 07/28/2008 4:39:06 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: cowboyway; Sherman Logan
...us local Southerners despise you damnyankee transplants.

So much for all that 'heritage not hate' crap y'all spout.

34 posted on 07/28/2008 4:40:52 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Sherman Logan
If you can come up with some valid answers to my questions, as opposed to non-responsive victimized rants, I'm perfectly willing to change my mind.

Such is not the cowboy way.

35 posted on 07/28/2008 4:41:36 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Sherman Logan
Is that why you make no attempt to answer any of my questions?

Your mindset is that of a big city yankee. You need the mindset of a rural lifestyle where the plantation or farm and the people on it are the only thing you see for long periods. Where your entire work and social world is wrapped up in that rural area.

With that in mind, lets get back to the story or Weary. The yankee mindset pictures all the antebellum South as one huge cotton plantation run by a hands off gentleman planter and worked by thousands of mistreated slaves.

Of course, there were large plantations with hundreds of slaves but in the area of NC where Weary was from the farms were usually much smaller. There's a good chance that Weary's family were the only slaves on this farm and that Frank and his family worked side by side with them in the fields. Without the pressures of the city social scene it is easy to understand that Frank and Weary could have spent many a day fishing, hunting, etc., and not even think about the class system at play.

Given that environment, it's also easy to believe that once Frank joined the Confederate Army, that Weary could have asked permission of Frank's father to join, also.

That's the best way I can explain it.

36 posted on 07/28/2008 5:57:34 AM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: Non-Sequitur
So much for all that 'heritage not hate' crap y'all spout.

It's a new day. Current feelings have nothing to do with the historical animosity.

I doubt that very many people from Mass, NY, NJ, etc. are moving to the flats of Kansas as they are to my area in SC, therefore you don't have a clue (as usual) of what you're talking about.

I'd wager that if they were moving into your area that you would rethink your syrupy love for all things yankee.

37 posted on 07/28/2008 6:07:11 AM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: cowboyway
This is a good thread for these:


38 posted on 07/28/2008 6:18:51 AM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: Sherman Logan
Why I Wave the Confederate Flag
39 posted on 07/28/2008 6:20:04 AM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: cowboyway
I doubt that very many people from Mass, NY, NJ, etc. are moving to the flats of Kansas as they are to my area in SC...

We're sending you the dumb, obnoxious ones. They fit in better.

I'd wager that if they were moving into your area that you would rethink your syrupy love for all things yankee.

We get a few. On the whole they seem like nice people. You and people like you must bring out the worst in them.

40 posted on 07/28/2008 6:23:07 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Non-Sequitur
We get a few. On the whole they seem like nice people.

You'd say that here even if you actually despised them.

Your reputation as a liar and rabble rouser precedes you.

41 posted on 07/28/2008 6:29:27 AM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: manc; GOP_Raider; TenthAmendmentChampion; snuffy smiff; slow5poh; EdReform; TheZMan; ...

Dixie Ping


42 posted on 07/28/2008 6:59:07 AM PDT by stainlessbanner
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To: cowboyway
Your reputation as a liar and rabble rouser precedes you.

Pot? This is kettle. Kettle? Pot.

43 posted on 07/28/2008 7:36:26 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: stainlessbanner

Thanks for the Ping! This is a great post.


44 posted on 07/28/2008 7:39:00 AM PDT by BnBlFlag (Deo Vindice/Semper Fidelis "Ya gotta saddle up your boys; Ya gotta draw a hard line")
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To: Non-Sequitur

Just out of curiosity NS, did you sign up on FR for the express purpose of agitating southrons? Seriously, I’m not sure if I’ve seen any of your posts in any other kind of thread in a while.


45 posted on 07/28/2008 8:18:24 AM PDT by JamesP81 (George Orwell's 1984 was a warning, not a suggestion)
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To: JamesP81
Just out of curiosity NS, did you sign up on FR for the express purpose of agitating southrons? Seriously, I’m not sure if I’ve seen any of your posts in any other kind of thread in a while.

Since when is disagreeing with cowboyway's asinine remarks 'agitating southrons'? I'm sure you all would prefer a nice quite forum where you can say any outrageous thing you want without fear of contradiction, and I can point you to one or two sites like that. But if post here then be prepared to have your fairy tales challenged.

46 posted on 07/28/2008 8:51:30 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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To: Non-Sequitur; JamesP81
But if post here then be prepared to have your fairy tales challenged.

The 'fairy tale' is in the ever decreasing folds of your cranial cavity, NS.

47 posted on 07/28/2008 9:19:14 AM PDT by cowboyway ("The beauty of the Second Amendment is you won't need it until they try to take it away"--Jefferson)
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To: Non-Sequitur

You must really enjoy these sorts of threads. I’ve always wondered about people who get enjoyment out of being obnoxious.


48 posted on 07/28/2008 9:19:45 AM PDT by JamesP81 (George Orwell's 1984 was a warning, not a suggestion)
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To: JamesP81

I believe it’s been mentioned before...It’s the cowboyway...


49 posted on 07/28/2008 10:02:27 AM PDT by rockrr (Global warming is to science what Islam is to religion)
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To: Sherman Logan

“Those who deny freedom to others deserve it not for themselves. - A. Lincoln”

And yet, Abe said he was willing to do just that if it meant preserving the Union. Go figure.


50 posted on 07/28/2008 10:30:10 AM PDT by Lee'sGhost (Johnny Rico picked the wrong girl!)
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