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Teacher Union Union Bosses (NEA & AFT) speak at DNC Convention demanding more pay for less work.

Posted on 08/26/2008 11:04:39 AM PDT by 1Old Pro

When I listen to the AFT and NEA union thug bosses at the DNC two things POP out at me.

1) The teacher's Unions are firmly in the pocket of the Democrats, or vice versa. We will never have education reform until people understand the unions are political big government liberals, not interested in education, only interested in more pay for less work (smaller classes and thus the need for more dues paying teachers).

2) Their message alwasy goes unchallenged by the media. Thre is no connection with higher per pupil spending and educational outcomes - it's time to freeze public school spending and allow for competition.


TOPICS: Education
KEYWORDS: 2008dncconvention; aft; democrats; dnc; education; elections; nea; publiceducation; publicschools; teachersunions; unions

1 posted on 08/26/2008 11:04:39 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: 1Old Pro

I have no problem with good salaries for teachers, but I remember getting in an argument with one who said she only makes $50,000 a year, and there were managers in corporations making $75,000 a year. I asked her how many days she worked a year as opposed to the manager. When she realized where I was going with this, she snotted that she had the more important job. Really? Because if I performed at my job the way many California public school teachers performed at theirs, I’d be fired.

And yet there are really good teachers, who have a real dedication to what they’re doing and want their students to succeed - unfortunately, they get lumped in with the rest of the non-achievers.


2 posted on 08/26/2008 11:12:39 AM PDT by Right Cal Gal (Abraham Lincoln would have let Berkeley leave the Union without a fight)
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To: Right Cal Gal
I have no problem with good salaries for teachers

Me neither, I favor MERIT PAY, the unions are totally against it.

3 posted on 08/26/2008 11:15:37 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: 1Old Pro
...demanding more pay for less work.

Hell, I don't disagree with that. I think that a better question to ask is "Who wouldn't want to work less, and get more dough?" /sarc

Personally, I'd love to work a 180-190 day year and draw a full salary for what I do. Unfortunately, my profession, like most others, requires full-time, year-round employment....something these union hacks would know nothing about.

4 posted on 08/26/2008 11:22:21 AM PDT by wbill
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To: Right Cal Gal
she snotted that she had the more important job.

I don't need to tell people that my job is important. It's just assumed. :-)

5 posted on 08/26/2008 11:24:10 AM PDT by wbill
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To: Right Cal Gal

Yea I love the ‘more important job’ meme that gets tossed around...

For the last time its not the importance of the Job that determines the pay were that the case Janitors would be the highest paid people on the planet. You are paid based on how many people can do your job!


6 posted on 08/26/2008 11:26:01 AM PDT by N3WBI3 (Ah, arrogance and stupidity all in the same package. How efficient of you. -- Londo Mollari)
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To: 1Old Pro
I read an article that made an interesting point. Take a classroom of 20 students for 13 years (K-12). At $10,000/student (some districts are more, some are less...this is just a nice, round easy average to work with)...that works out to over 2-1/2 MILLION dollars per classroom of students, over their public school career.

Strawman argument, I know. But I still thought it was fascinating. Wonder what private education, or tutoring for that same 20 kids would cost? And would the ROI (higher employment, professional advancement) be better as well?

7 posted on 08/26/2008 11:30:29 AM PDT by wbill
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To: 1Old Pro

My wife is a public school teacher in The Peoples Democratic Workers Republic of Massachusetts. Oh, the tales she tells!


8 posted on 08/26/2008 11:31:04 AM PDT by pabianice
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To: wbill

To put it in perspective most catholic/parochial schools cost anywhere between 2-3K per year. The really good private schools *think elite* in Minnesota start at 8-12K which is less than the cost of one kid in the Minneapolis school system!

The big difference is involvement by parents, many of these gret schools would not keep trouble makers and unless mom or dad is willing to go after the kid and not the school their kids wont shape up..


9 posted on 08/26/2008 11:39:42 AM PDT by N3WBI3 (Ah, arrogance and stupidity all in the same package. How efficient of you. -- Londo Mollari)
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To: wbill
Take a classroom of 20 students for 13 years (K-12). At $10,000/student

First, it's 14k/student in NY and let's forget the 20 years; That's $280,000 allocated for 9 months. Let's say we pay the teacher $65,000 plus benefits or about $80,000 for those 9 months. That leaves $200,000 for leasing a room, getting transportation, and outfitting the room with desks and equipment. Figure you can rent a room for less than $1000/ month, so that's 9,000 and say 20 desk/equipment is prorated at 20,000. That leaves about $170,000 left over which can be used to get each kid a health club membership, a computer, school uniforms and free lunch with $100,000 to spare.

10 posted on 08/26/2008 11:40:41 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: N3WBI3
The big difference is involvement by parents

Well, you hit it right there.

Every now and again I get an itch to jump in politics, specifically the school board. Seems the best place to help.

Then I realize that 80% of the parents, don't give a rip. And the 20% who do....their kids will be just fine regardless of where they go.

So, I stay out. Easier to sleep at night.

11 posted on 08/26/2008 11:43:51 AM PDT by wbill
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To: 1Old Pro

I’ve been a Freeper longer than I’ve been a teacher. But I’ve got to tell you, being in charge of 35 twelve-year olds for two hours straight (and that’s only one of my classes) is exhausting. Especially since at least six of them are gangsters and a few are diagnosed as special ed. Yes, I think I need a smaller class size. It’s not an evil plot. I go home every day utterly drained.


12 posted on 08/26/2008 11:47:04 AM PDT by A_perfect_lady
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To: 1Old Pro
I just picked $10,000 as an easy number to work with. Rural schools in my area are not anywhere near that, while the city schools sit closer to $14-16K.

Regardless, you're right on the money. Even chopping my numbers in half results in a workable system....if privatized. :-)

I have a number of friends that are teachers. IMHO, the problem doesn't lie solely with them, it's more with the (bloated, corrupt, inept, lazy) administrations. Add any number of "specialists" - speech, hearing, behavioral, grief counseling, whatever - to that....and that's where the expenses come in.

While I'm on my soapbox....I also disagree with the current "No child left behind" plan. Frankly, some kids need to be left behind. Either they're not capable, or not willing to learn at the rate of their peers. As my father is fond of saying..."The world needs people to dig ditches, too."

13 posted on 08/26/2008 11:51:07 AM PDT by wbill
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To: A_perfect_lady

So do I and I am not a teacher...


14 posted on 08/26/2008 11:53:55 AM PDT by N3WBI3 (Ah, arrogance and stupidity all in the same package. How efficient of you. -- Londo Mollari)
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To: N3WBI3

Since I don’t know what you do, I can’t offer you any advice.


15 posted on 08/26/2008 11:59:00 AM PDT by A_perfect_lady
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To: wbill

We have SO MANY people who are certified as teachers but getting paid a lot to do other things. Four assistant principals, math coach, literacy coach, counselors, deans....


16 posted on 08/26/2008 12:01:09 PM PDT by A_perfect_lady
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To: 1Old Pro

Slight correct to your math.

I think in NY the figure is $14,600 - AND as a bonus, you only need to graduate about 60% of the kids to meet the State Average!


17 posted on 08/26/2008 12:11:43 PM PDT by PGR88
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To: 1Old Pro

Teachers demanding more pay for less work?? Has this ever happened before?? (Sarcasm)


18 posted on 08/26/2008 12:12:07 PM PDT by ozzymandus
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To: A_perfect_lady
Well, here's a good question. How many of them are critical to the point of education? I mean, how does the Associate Dean of (fill in the blank) actually move the ball forward in getting the kids to read+write?

I've not put my point across well - it's hard to do on an issue this complex, in a forum like this. I guess to sum up, I think that there are far too few people (teachers)at the sharp end of the spear, and far too many hangers on behind them that serve little purpose.

19 posted on 08/26/2008 12:14:38 PM PDT by wbill
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To: PGR88
you only need to graduate about 60% of the kids to meet the State Average

Wonder how long I'd work in the private sector if I was successful only 60% of the time? As in "Jeez, I showed up on time Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday this week, isn't that enough?". Or, "Jeez, you've got 20 PCs in your department and 12 of them are working, isn't that enough?"

Amazing how mediocrity is accepted, when nothing is on the line.

20 posted on 08/26/2008 12:22:35 PM PDT by wbill
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To: wbill
I'd kick every last one of them out of their comfy offices and put them back in the classroom. Well, I'd keep the deans. We have serious discipline issues here in Los Angeles, as you can imagine. But all these coaches and coordinators...? Waste of money. I bet if we got them all teaching, we could knock class size down a bit. I have to say, any more than 27 adolescents in a room, and you're heading for misery city. Unless they're honors. I've got my first honors class this year, and oh my Lord, they are so civilized. I'm so relieved to see them every day. I want to take pictures. With them, it doesn't seem so bad that there are 32. They have manners.

But the little gangsters, let me tell you, 35 of them and you're hurting.

21 posted on 08/26/2008 1:47:55 PM PDT by A_perfect_lady
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To: 1Old Pro
one of the great hoaxes contrived by the leftist and Rat minions is that somehow teaching is the holiest and most sacred of all occupations, with brilliant people giving up their lives to work in slave conditions in schools.....

the AVERAGE teacher works three months less than other people ....they earn an average of $47,000 a yr....they get magnificent benefits.....both while "working" and can retire pretty dang early with magnificent benefits as well.....

yet we have constant "teacher of the month" media hype, Bill Gates handing our personal laptops, constant portrayal in the media of how underpaid and under appreciated teachers are .....

22 posted on 08/27/2008 12:30:27 AM PDT by cherry
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