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Kangaroos 'are closely related to humans'
Daily Mail ^ | Tuesday, November 18th, 2008 | unattributed

Posted on 11/18/2008 6:42:33 PM PST by SunkenCiv

Kangaroos are closely related to humans Humans and kangaroos are close cousins on the evolutionary tree sharing a common ancestor 150 million years ago, according to Australian researchers.

Scientists have mapped the genetic code of the Australian marsupials for the first time and found large chunks of DNA are the same.

'There are a few differences, we have a few more of this, a few less of that, but they are the same genes and a lot of them are in the same order,'  said Jenny Graves, director of the Centre of Excellence for Kangaroo Genomics.

'We thought they'd be completely scrambled, but they're not. There is great chunks of the human genome which is sitting right there in the kangaroo genome,' she added.

Humans and kangaroos last shared an ancestor 150million years ago, the researchers found, while mice and humans diverged from one another 70 million years ago.

They believe kangaroos first evolved in China, but migrated across the Americas to Australia and Antarctica.

'Kangaroos are hugely informative about what we were like 150 million years ago,' Graves said.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: australia; dna; godsgravesglyphs; helixmakemineadouble; kangaroo; kangaroos

1 posted on 11/18/2008 6:42:33 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; ...

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To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

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2 posted on 11/18/2008 6:43:20 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: SunkenCiv

I read that. Its BS.
Correct title is Humans have more in common with Mice than Kangaroos.


3 posted on 11/18/2008 6:44:38 PM PST by omega4179 (1-20-2013)
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To: SunkenCiv
Humans and kangaroos last shared an ancestor 150 million years ago, the researchers found, while mice and humans diverged from one another 70 million years ago.

So they're one of the farthest mammals, but that is "closely related".

4 posted on 11/18/2008 6:46:55 PM PST by KarlInOhio (11/4: The revolutionary socialists beat the Fabian ones. Where can we find a capitalist party?)
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To: KarlInOhio

Isn’t this the sort of thing that makes one hopping mad?


5 posted on 11/18/2008 6:50:31 PM PST by AmericanVictory
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To: KarlInOhio

Isn’t this the sort of thing that makes one hopping mad?


6 posted on 11/18/2008 6:50:41 PM PST by AmericanVictory
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To: SunkenCiv
We'll keep Australia,
wouldn't want to hurt no kangaroo.
We'll build an all-American amusement park there.
They got surfin' too.

7 posted on 11/18/2008 6:59:23 PM PST by Hugin (GSA! (Goodbye sweet America))
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To: SunkenCiv

I see a new Cap One commercial: “What’s in your pouch?”


8 posted on 11/18/2008 7:05:00 PM PST by milemark (You're all just jealous because the voices speak only to me.)
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To: SunkenCiv

9 posted on 11/18/2008 7:06:11 PM PST by JoeProBono ( Loose Associations - Postcards from My Mind)
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To: KarlInOhio
So they're one of the farthest mammals, but that is "closely related".

Well they are closer than platypuses, and much closer than alligators.

10 posted on 11/18/2008 7:07:27 PM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla (So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.)
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To: AmericanVictory

Calling Captain Kangaroo...


11 posted on 11/18/2008 7:07:58 PM PST by Northern Yankee (Freedom Needs A Soldier)
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To: DieHard the Hunter
Hey mate... sounds a bit strange to me.

Maype Rolf Harris could do a ditty about this one!

12 posted on 11/18/2008 7:09:54 PM PST by Northern Yankee (Freedom Needs A Soldier)
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To: JoeProBono; Fred Nerks; martin_fierro

Okay, JPB, that pretty much settles it. You’ve got a picture for *everything*. ;’)


13 posted on 11/18/2008 7:10:22 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: AmericanVictory

I just wallaby offline for the rest of the night when I read stories like this.


14 posted on 11/18/2008 7:11:31 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: Northern Yankee

> Hey mate... sounds a bit strange to me.

Mate, makes perfect sense to me. Lonely Australians left to their own devices...


15 posted on 11/18/2008 7:11:45 PM PST by DieHard the Hunter (Is mise an ceann-cinnidh. Cha ghéill mi do dhuine. Fàg am bealach.)
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To: SunkenCiv
We thought they'd be completely scrambled, but they're not. There is great chunks of the human genome which is sitting right there in the kangaroo genome,' she added.

Sounds like modular design, to me.

16 posted on 11/18/2008 7:13:50 PM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: SunkenCiv
All Together Now
17 posted on 11/18/2008 7:16:57 PM PST by JoeProBono ( Loose Associations - Postcards from My Mind)
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To: SunkenCiv
Evolutionary Biologists Closely Related to Creative Writers

18 posted on 11/18/2008 7:21:30 PM PST by aWolverine
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To: RegulatorCountry

How Science Is Rewriting the Book on Genes
The Washington Post | November 12, 2007 | David Brown
Posted on 11/12/2007 1:32:15 AM PST by neverdem
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1924453/posts

Now: The Rest of the Genome
The New York Times | November 10, 2008 | Carl Zimmer
Posted on 11/10/2008 7:54:59 PM PST by Soliton
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2129810/posts


19 posted on 11/18/2008 7:22:22 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: JoeProBono

What in Jehosaphat is Thattt!!!


20 posted on 11/18/2008 7:23:01 PM PST by FastCoyote (I am intolerant of the intolerable.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Jenny Graves, director of the Centre of Excellence for Kangaroo Genomics.

What in heaven's name does that mean?

21 posted on 11/18/2008 7:25:03 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: SunkenCiv

The Centre aims to map and provide essential data for the completion of the sequence and assembly of the entire wallaby genome as a representative kangaroo and to explore functional biology of marsupial as models for understanding genomics, reproduction and development in mammals. The Centre will use this information to make fundamental discoveries about the organization, function and evolution of mammal genomes, including human.

The animal model for our studies is a small member of the kangaroo family, the tammar (Macropus eugenii). The tammar wallaby has been selected as it is amenable to handling and breeds well in captivity. It is also well understood, having been the subject of research in marsupial genetics and genomics, as well as physiological, developmental and ecological studies over many years.

Over the next three years (2008-2010) the Centre will expand its focus from two, to all eight chromosomes, of the female tammar wallaby genome.

The ARC Centre of Excellence for Kangaroo Genomics, fondly called KanGO.

22 posted on 11/18/2008 7:31:32 PM PST by Fred Nerks (FAIR DINKUM)
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To: Fred Nerks

They’re working on a kangaroo version of Ritalin. ;’)


23 posted on 11/18/2008 7:32:14 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: SunkenCiv

I say that bloke is cruising for a serious thumping...


24 posted on 11/18/2008 7:34:08 PM PST by rahbert
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To: omega4179
150 Million years ago? That's closer to the Age of Dinosaurs than it is to the present (about 90% of the way, in fact). Since modern mammals are thought to have evolved from the more primative marsupial line, what about this article is actually shocking?
25 posted on 11/18/2008 7:35:03 PM PST by Tallguy ("The sh- t's chess, it ain't checkers!" -- Alonzo (Denzel Washington) in "Training Day")
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To: JoeProBono
cousin caterpillar
26 posted on 11/18/2008 7:35:12 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: SunkenCiv
Proof.
27 posted on 11/18/2008 7:36:29 PM PST by Daffynition ("Government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem.")
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To: Tallguy
The Age(s) of Dinosaurs ended only 65 million years ago. :')
Early Marsupial Fossils Found
by Kenneth Chang
(1998)
Scurrying around some 80 million years ago, during the age of dinosaurs, an early relative of the present-day opossum was unremarkable in appearance. It looked like, well, a small opossum. More surprising is where it was scurrying: Mongolia.
Earliest known marsupial unearthed in China
by Emma Young
19:00 11 December 03
The oldest known fossil skeleton of an ancestor of modern marsupials has been unearthed in north-eastern China. The spectacular find is 50 million years older than the previous record holder, and helps to fill a key gap in the understanding of early mammal evolution. China's Yixian rock formation, which is 125 million years old, has produced a spectacular haul of early mammal fossils, including, in 2002, the earliest known placental mammal... The discovery of both the oldest known marsupial and placental mammal at the same site gives a powerful boost to the theory that the two important lineages evolved in Eurasia, and then spread to the rest of the world... Some other researchers are unconvinced by this, but nonetheless agree that the find is very important. This is partly because the skeleton suggests the early marsupial could climb trees, just like early placental animals... The earliest known mammal fossil remains were unearthed in Texas, US, and date back 225 million years... Teeth of marsupial-like fossils dating back about 110 million years ago have been found in the US.

28 posted on 11/18/2008 7:44:35 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: SunkenCiv

Well, thank you for the links. The observation that finding “chunks,” or modules, of the human genome contained — apparently intact if this article is accurate — within the kangaroo genome sounds like modular design, still stands. As a point of reference, consider modular source code libraries for programming, in C++ or Java. Write it once, use it many times.


29 posted on 11/18/2008 7:45:28 PM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: SunkenCiv

'Sup.

30 posted on 11/18/2008 7:45:30 PM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: RegulatorCountry

The current thinking (and this has been for a while) is that genes are three base-pair sequences, and there are reasons this is thought. But the sheer quantity of duplicative sequences, particularly those which apparently don’t do anything, are generally taken to mean that the viral infections have left non-functioning chunks of spliced-in base pairs.

For instance, the base-pair sequence for type O blood is identical to the base-pair sequence for type A blood, except that it lacks the first base pair. That could mean that type A arose later, but to my mind (and for several reasons) it means that type O is a descendant of type A.


31 posted on 11/18/2008 7:50:15 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: martin_fierro

Looks like he’s half in the, uh, bag...


32 posted on 11/18/2008 7:51:31 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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The Scars of Evolution:
What Our Bodies Tell Us
About Human Origins

by Elaine Morgan
"The most remarkable aspect of Todaro's discovery emerged when he examined Homo Sapiens for the 'baboon marker'. It was not there... Todaro drew one firm conclusion. 'The ancestors of man did not develop in a geographical area where they would have been in contact with the baboon. I would argue that the data we are presenting imply a non-African origin of man millions of years ago.'"

33 posted on 11/18/2008 7:52:01 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: SunkenCiv

“Kangaroos are hugely informative about what we were like 150 million years ago,’ Graves said. “

Finally something useful ;-)


34 posted on 11/18/2008 7:53:24 PM PST by School of Rational Thought (Sarah Palin - High ideals on high heels)
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To: School of Rational Thought

Hey, you must not have seen *this* one yet:

Scientists: Bison in Illinois earlier (aren’t you relieved?)
South Carolina homepage (thestate.com) | Tue, Aug. 30, 2005 | Associated Press
Posted on 09/03/2005 7:17:31 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/1476377/posts


35 posted on 11/18/2008 7:58:59 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: SunkenCiv

36 posted on 11/18/2008 8:03:06 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Everytime they open their mouth they shoot themselves in the foot.)
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To: DieHard the Hunter
Lonely Australians left to their own devices...

Honest, officer. I was just helping that 'roo across the fence.

37 posted on 11/18/2008 8:07:09 PM PST by seowulf (Discipline knows no emotion and frequently runs counter to the whims of panic or elation.)
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To: seowulf
I wanna roo you,
Wanna get close to you...

(Van Morrison)

38 posted on 11/18/2008 8:09:02 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Everytime they open their mouth they shoot themselves in the foot.)
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To: SunkenCiv
The earliest known mammal fossil remains were unearthed in Texas, US, and date back 225 million years

That would have had to be egg-laying mammals (monotremes), and in the middle Triassic Period, just as the dinosaurs were coming into dominance.

39 posted on 11/18/2008 8:41:04 PM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla (So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.)
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To: SunkenCiv

< smacks forehead > yep, you’re right of course! It’s getting late & the caffeine deficit is making the numbers fuzzy in my brain!


40 posted on 11/18/2008 8:58:51 PM PST by Tallguy ("The sh- t's chess, it ain't checkers!" -- Alonzo (Denzel Washington) in "Training Day")
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To: SunkenCiv

That lends a whole new erotic dimension to the meaning of the lyrics in “Tie Me Kangaroo Down, Sport.”


41 posted on 11/18/2008 9:06:19 PM PST by Bernard Marx
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To: Northern Yankee

Now we know the problem.

He’s in Mr. Green Jeans.


42 posted on 11/19/2008 5:12:20 AM PST by wolfcreek (I see miles and miles of Texas....let's keep it that way.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Hah!


43 posted on 11/19/2008 8:21:37 AM PST by LiteKeeper (Beware the secularization of America; the Islamization of Eurabia)
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To: DieHard the Hunter

Me thinks those lonely Australians need their own mates. ; )


44 posted on 11/19/2008 9:44:32 AM PST by Northern Yankee (Freedom Needs A Soldier)
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