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Researchers identify new leprosy bacterium
EUREKA ALERT/M. D. Anderson ^ | Nov. 24, 2008 | Scott Merville

Posted on 12/01/2008 2:49:11 PM PST by AuntB

M. D. Anderson scientists use genetic fingerprint to nail 'killing organism'

This release is available in Spanish.

IMAGE: Xiang-Yang Han, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor in Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

HOUSTON - A new species of bacterium that causes leprosy has been identified through intensive genetic analysis of a pair of lethal infections, a research team reports in the December issue of the American Journal of Clinical Pathology.

All cases of leprosy, an ancient disease that still maims and kills in the developing world, previously had been thought to be caused by a single species of bacterium, said lead author Xiang-Yang Han, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

“We have identified a second species of leprosy mycobacterium, and in identifying this killing organism we’ve better defined the disease that it causes, diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL).” Han said. DLL occurs mainly in Mexico and the Caribbean.

There are hundreds of thousands of new cases of leprosy worldwide each year, but the disease is rare in the United States, with 100-200 new cases annually, mostly among immigrants. Leprosy initially attacks skin and nerve cells.

R. Geetha Nair, M.D., a physician with Maricopa Integrated Health System in Phoenix, contacted Han in 2007 for help confirming a possible leprosy diagnosis in a patient who died that February.

The patient, a 53-year-old man originally from Mexico, was admitted that month for treatment of extensive leg wounds. While undergoing antibiotic treatment and additional diagnostic testing the next day, he was stricken with high fever and shock. He died after 10 days in intensive care.

Analysis of autopsied tissue at the Phoenix hospital suggested a diagnosis of diffuse lepromatous leprosy, a form first described in Mexico in 1852. Han said DLL uniquely attacks a patient’s skin vasculature, blocking or impeding blood flow. This leads to extensive skin death at late stage and may cause secondary infection and fatal shock. The DLL bacterium had never been studied.[snips]


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: aliens; biologicterror; diversity; illegalaliens; immigrantlist; immigration; leprosy; mexico; pestilence
This is an article you likely won’t see on the news tonight. It was sent today by our border agent friends.
1 posted on 12/01/2008 2:49:11 PM PST by AuntB
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To: neverdem; gubamyster; HiJinx; SwinneySwitch; pissant; Calpernia

neverdem, do you still have that ‘health’ ping list?


2 posted on 12/01/2008 2:50:39 PM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925)
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To: AuntB

Can this form of leprosy be carried by armadillos?


3 posted on 12/01/2008 2:53:54 PM PST by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified DeCartes))
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To: SumProVita

“Can this form of leprosy be carried by armadillos?”

I was reading about the strain carried by armadillos earlier. Evidently this one is a whole other monster.


4 posted on 12/01/2008 2:55:59 PM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925)
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To: SumProVita; All

“Can this form of leprosy be carried by armadillos?”

The armadillo is not a carrier of leprosy. It just so happens that Mycobacterium leprae will only grow in living tissue of a certain temperature and not on laboratory medium like agar plates. The footpads of mice were once used, but someone found out that the bacterium grew well in armadillos in a lab setting. They do not act as “carriers” in the wild.


5 posted on 12/01/2008 2:59:30 PM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: AuntB; Mother Abigail; EBH; vetvetdoug; Smokin' Joe; Global2010; Battle Axe
neverdem, do you still have that ‘health’ ping list?

Yes. I'll link it later on one of my threads. I'll micro ping these folks now. Thank you.

6 posted on 12/01/2008 3:00:48 PM PST by neverdem (Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem; B4Ranch; Travis McGee; Liz; calcowgirl; DoughtyOne; Issaquahking; SierraWasp

Thank you, neverdem, even though this got delegated to ‘chat’, it should be seen.


7 posted on 12/01/2008 3:02:57 PM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925)
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To: Sola Veritas

“The armadillo is not a carrier of leprosy.”

What do you make of this then?

“It was long thought only humans could get leprosy. Then in the late 1960s researchers speculated that armadillos might be a good test bed for leprosy research because (a) M. leprae thrives in cooler parts of the body (feet, nose, ears, etc.); (b) armadillos have a relatively low body temperature as mammals go, 30 to 35 degrees Celsius compared to 37 degrees in humans (98.6 Fahrenheit for you retro types); (c) armadillos live long enough, 12 to 15 years, for this slow-acting disease to emerge; and (d) armadillo litters almost invariably consist of identical quadruplets, which was useful for genetic experiments.

Aspects of this conjecture might seem far-fetched (I’m thinking of the low body temp part), but it panned out. Several nine-banded armadillos, the type found in the U.S., were inoculated with leprosy germs and came down with full-blown cases of the disease.

Later the researchers discovered something odd: some armadillos already had leprosy. At first they thought the animals had escaped from the leprosy-inoculation experiment or become infected through contact with the lab’s waste. But eventually these possibilities were ruled out. Nine-banded armadillos, of which there are 30 to 50 million in the southeastern U.S., are believed to be the only significant natural reservoir of leprosy apart from humans. (A few cases have been found in chimps and mangabey monkeys in Africa.) How the armadillos got leprosy in the first place nobody knows. But there you are.” (From the Straight Dope)


8 posted on 12/01/2008 3:11:50 PM PST by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified DeCartes))
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To: AuntB

A couple of years ago, caught some Michael Savage talking about all the diseases returning to to America, via illegals. Till America decides to be a free nation again, I only see things getting worse, long before they get better.


9 posted on 12/01/2008 3:12:54 PM PST by Issaquahking (Obama won the election, and America lost!)
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To: AuntB; Dr. Eckleburg; flutters; genefromjersey; Ptarmigan; nw_arizona_granny

Bio Ping


10 posted on 12/01/2008 3:14:50 PM PST by Calpernia (Hunters Rangers - Raising the Bar of Integrity http://www.barofintegrity.us)
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To: AuntB

Leprosy, TB, a lot of intractable diseases being introduced by immigrants.

I think there was a story back last spring about South Sea Islanders in one of the southern states who had leprosy, too.

Yes, I just looked it up, and it’s Marshallese in Springdale, Arkansas. Working for Tyson Chicken, of course.

http://24ahead.com/blog/archives/007464.html


11 posted on 12/01/2008 3:25:09 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: SumProVita

While studying pathogenic bacteria at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, I was taught that armadillos could carry leprosy naturally. Bets are the entire subject is up for discussion.


12 posted on 12/01/2008 3:28:20 PM PST by vetvetdoug
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To: vetvetdoug

When we lived in western Tennessee, our wildlife officers told us to be careful of handling armadillos because of this.
The more I researched this, the more it became obvious that they carry it....but my initial question was with regard to this *new* strain of leprosy.


13 posted on 12/01/2008 3:31:22 PM PST by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified DeCartes))
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To: AuntB

Just one teeny little problem with this announcement. They’re never be able to actually make the bacteria cause leprosy. And they never will. Ever.

It’s like all the other diseases they *believe* are caused by one bacteria or another. None of it has ever been proven. They can’t make these alledged disease-causing bacteria cause the disease in experimentation conducted in proper scientific method. They never have. They never will.

Dont’ bother asking for or demanding an explanation of what I’m saying. I don’t owe you or anyone else an explanation.

Medicine is not science. It’s religion. It operates on belief, faith.


14 posted on 12/01/2008 3:39:31 PM PST by gpk9
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To: Coleus; AdmSmith; Berosus; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Fred Nerks; ...
All cases of leprosy, an ancient disease that still maims and kills in the developing world, previously had been thought to be caused by a single species of bacterium, said lead author Xiang-Yang Han, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor in Laboratory Medicine at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. "We have identified a second species of leprosy mycobacterium, and in identifying this killing organism we've better defined the disease that it causes, diffuse lepromatous leprosy (DLL)." ...There are hundreds of thousands of new cases of leprosy worldwide each year, but the disease is rare in the United States, with 100-200 new cases annually, mostly among immigrants. Leprosy initially attacks skin and nerve cells.

15 posted on 12/01/2008 3:49:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/_______Profile finally updated Saturday, October 11, 2008 !!!)
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To: gpk9

>I don’t owe you or anyone else an explanation.<

Why do you bother with the post if you don’t wish to explain the reasons behind it?

No, I am NOT asking for an explanation, so calm down.


16 posted on 12/01/2008 4:10:26 PM PST by B4Ranch ( Veterans: "There is no expiration date on our oath, to protect America from all enemies, ...")
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To: gpk9
I recommend against innoculating yourself with Y. pestis as a way of proving your point.
17 posted on 12/01/2008 4:20:23 PM PST by Sherman Logan (Everyone has a right to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.)
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To: SumProVita

“What do you make of this then?”

That one learns something new everyday. Today I learned it from you. Thanks!


18 posted on 12/01/2008 4:32:20 PM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: Sola Veritas

You’re very welcome....and, by the way, I’m a moral conservative too. ;-)


19 posted on 12/01/2008 4:42:40 PM PST by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified DeCartes))
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To: gpk9; All

“It’s like all the other diseases they *believe* are caused by one bacteria or another. None of it has ever been proven. They can’t make these alledged disease-causing bacteria cause the disease in experimentation conducted in proper scientific method. They never have. They never will.”

Heavenly days are you ever out in left field. Look up and read about “Koch’s Postulates.” The “germ” theory of disease has been, using scientific methodology, been proven time and time again in real time.

If you don’t think bacteria have been definitively linked to disease, then you wouldn’t mind if I injected you with a small amount of Yersia pestis. Then when you develop bubonic or septicemic plague in a week or so, it won’t be my fault.....it just happened.


20 posted on 12/01/2008 4:43:01 PM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: SumProVita

“I’m a moral conservative too. ;-)”

Does it get you in as much trouble as it gets me? :-)


21 posted on 12/01/2008 4:44:58 PM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: Sola Veritas

Let’s just say it gives me a real challenge with various people...and I love a good challenge.

;-)


22 posted on 12/01/2008 4:50:23 PM PST by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified DeCartes))
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To: B4Ranch
"Why do you bother with the post if you don’t wish to explain the reasons behind it?"

Because we can post an opinion on FreeRepublic without having to explain it. Explaining an opinion is an option, not a requirement.

If you're not asking for an explanation then the comment doesn't apply to you, so calm down yourself.
23 posted on 12/01/2008 9:45:56 PM PST by gpk9
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To: Sola Veritas; Sherman Logan

Like I said, they’ll never be able to make said bacteria cause leprosy in properly controlled scientific experimentation. Ever.

It being the cause of leprosy and a “killer bacteria” is pure speculation. Pure conjecture. Absolutely no proof whatever, and there never will be.


24 posted on 12/01/2008 9:50:15 PM PST by gpk9
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Ping.


25 posted on 12/01/2008 10:01:21 PM PST by LucyT
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To: Sola Veritas
"Look up and read about “Koch’s Postulates.”"

I know all about Kock's Postulates. One of them states explicitly that a suspected organism must reproduce the illness consistently, over and over again, in properly controlled scientific experimentation.

Said bacteria will NEVER reproduce leprosy in properly controlled scientific experimentation, so it fails Koch's Postulates.

"The “germ” theory of disease has been, using scientific methodology, been proven time and time again in real time."

No, it absolutely has not. The germ theory has NEVER been proven in properly controlled scientific experimentation.

That's WHY it's still a theory. It NEVER has been proven. EVER.
26 posted on 12/01/2008 10:05:51 PM PST by gpk9
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To: gpk9

“No, it absolutely has not. The germ theory has NEVER been proven in properly controlled scientific experimentation.”

You sound like a member of Mary Baker Eddy’s cult. If you are, just admit it and stop wasting good people’s time with ridiculous assertions.


27 posted on 12/02/2008 7:43:47 AM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: Sola Veritas
"You sound like a member of Mary Baker Eddy’s cult. If you are, just admit it and stop wasting good people’s time with ridiculous assertions."

Typical response from medical-brainwashed types. You types have no proof for your beliefs. There is no proof for your beliefs. You've been operating for over 150 years on unproven and unprovable foolish ridiculous theories. You can't give a credible response because you have nothing to give a credible response with, so you resort to attacking the person. I've seen it more times than I can count.
28 posted on 12/02/2008 8:02:14 AM PST by gpk9
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To: gpk9; All

“Typical response from medical-brainwashed types.”

Yep, you are a Christ-Scientist cultist. I don’t give you a response because it isn’t worth the time. Like I said, leave good people alone.

Oh, and for the record. I don’t have a very high opinion of most in the medical field - but not for your silly reasons.


29 posted on 12/02/2008 8:52:53 AM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: 1_Inch_Group; 2sheep; 2Trievers; 3AngelaD; 3pools; 3rdcanyon; 4Freedom; 4ourprogeny; 7.62 x 51mm; ..

ping


30 posted on 12/02/2008 9:54:47 AM PST by gubamyster
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To: AuntB

Thanks. . .I think.. .


31 posted on 12/02/2008 11:37:33 AM PST by cricket (America's Freedom Rings! Thank You ~ U..S.A. Military~/)
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To: gpk9

Dude, they can type bacteria. They can do detailed structural and genetic studies of it. They can identify the actions or toxins that result in the disease symptoms.

If you don’t believe me, go find some Clostridium Tetanii and have at it.

Normally, I fully support freedom of speech no matter how much of a whack job. But your opinions threaten to throw medical technology back 300 years. And YOU - yes YOU YOURSELF - bear the responsibility for the social chaos that might result.

So you should probably put a lid on it. Odds are very high that someone you know or love has been saved in the past by the same technologies you are criticizing hear. In other words, STFU.


32 posted on 12/02/2008 11:42:21 AM PST by djf (...heard about a couple livin in the USA, he said they traded in their baby for a Chevrolet...)
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To: Sola Veritas

“If you don’t think bacteria have been definitively linked to disease, then you wouldn’t mind if I injected you with a small amount of Yersia pestis. Then when you develop bubonic or septicemic plague in a week or so, it won’t be my fault.....it just happened.”

Was going to suggest the same thing, except with anthrax or weaponized small pox...


33 posted on 12/02/2008 11:53:02 AM PST by piytar
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To: piytar

“Was going to suggest the same thing, except with anthrax or weaponized small pox...”

It wouldn’t even need to be weaponized if the person was not already immune. Actually, one of the hemorragic viruses (like ebola) would also do the trick. Chances of someone being immune to them is remote.


34 posted on 12/02/2008 3:06:16 PM PST by Sola Veritas (Trying to speak truth - not always with the best grammar or spelling)
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To: gubamyster; AuntB

Another pale horse rider from across the southern border bump.


35 posted on 12/02/2008 9:56:18 PM PST by exhaustedmomma (Way to go BARNEY!! Barney for White House Press Secretary.)
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To: AuntB
Very interesting. They're calling it Mycobacterium lepromatosis. It's almost M. leprae but not quite. That may explain some of the variability noticed in treatment across infected populations.

I did a little work with the Mycobacteria long ago in my path lab days. It was all fun until some knucklehead - not me - dropped a petri dish of the stuff on the floor. Ever see what an autoclave does to a pair of tennis shoes?

36 posted on 12/02/2008 10:07:30 PM PST by Billthedrill
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