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Economic Woes May Bring Back Victory Gardens
Centre Daily Times ^ | Saturday, Jan. 10, 2009 | Bill Lamont

Posted on 01/10/2009 6:05:11 PM PST by nickcarraway

I can remember my mother talking about the victory garden she had in the backyard of their home during World War II. My dad was in the Navy in the Pacific theater during the war and my mother felt that she was supporting the war effort with her little garden.

If you look up victory gardens you will find that during World War I and World War II, the government asked the residents of the United States to plant gardens in order to support the war effort. It was one way to bring the people together in support of a common goal and to make them feel that they were contributing to the war effort. It is estimated that millions of people planted gardens. In one article that I read it is recorded that “in 1943, Americans planted over 20 million victory gardens, and the harvest accounted for nearly a third of all the vegetables consumed in the country that year.” The article also stated “emphasis was placed on making gardening a family or community effort, not a drudgery, but a pastime, and a national duty.”

Jump forward to 2009. Given the not so rosy economic picture that the country and individuals are facing maybe we need to revisit the victory garden concept. If you go to www.revivevictorygarden.org/ you will find info on victory gardens. Victory gardens are not much different from vegetable gardens of today and the gardening principles and practices followed in the victory gardens are still the ones we use today in our gardens.

I would say that during World War I and World War II, everyone was encouraged to plant a garden, even if it was a small container on the patio or balcony.

Think if everyone planted some kind of a garden today. The amount of produce produced would be considerable and would dramatically increase the consumption of fresh and locally produced nutritious vegetables that would add to the well-being and health of our society, not to mention the positive impact to the family budget.

I am sure that many of the vegetables produced in the victory gardens were also canned and put up for use during the winter months, which in our society today is a dying art, but one that could be revived.

I see many positive aspects of encouraging victory gardens today. It seems to me that they hit the nail on the head when they said, “emphasis was placed on making gardening a family or community effort, not a drudgery, but a pastime, and a national duty.”

It seems to me that we need more of that kind of activity, commitment and spirit in society today. Make plans to have an economic victory garden in 2009.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Hobbies; Society
KEYWORDS: economy; food; landscape; vgarden; vgardens; victorygarden; victorygardens
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1 posted on 01/10/2009 6:05:11 PM PST by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

“I see many positive aspects of encouraging victory gardens today. “

Everything tastes better for starters.


2 posted on 01/10/2009 6:07:30 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: nickcarraway

I’ve been wanting to plant a garden since we moved to this house. I have one area that I usually put flowers in, but this year, I think I’ll make it a fully functioning garden.

I think my kids will also have fun working in the garden.


3 posted on 01/10/2009 6:09:53 PM PST by luckystarmom
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To: anonsquared; Gabz; Diana in Wisconsin

http://www.revivevictorygarden.org/

Too cool...


4 posted on 01/10/2009 6:10:47 PM PST by Bradís Gramma ( PRAY! Pray for Israel. Pray for the US.)
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To: anonsquared

And you get to decide how to control the weeds and bugs.Avoiding the pesticides and herbicides used in commercial vegtable farming would be a big plus.


5 posted on 01/10/2009 6:11:26 PM PST by Farmer Dean (168 grains of instant conflict resolution)
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To: Brad's Gramma

Yep, I like that site Brads Gramma.

For those who live in a small space or a space that does not have a yard:

KITCHEN GARDENS
http://www.google.com/search?&rls=en&q=kitchen+gardens&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8


6 posted on 01/10/2009 6:13:31 PM PST by Cindy
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To: nickcarraway

I’m thinking about a second garden. I have a spot over the drainfield where the grass needs to be mowed about twice as often as the rest of the yard.


7 posted on 01/10/2009 6:14:00 PM PST by cripplecreek (The poor bastards have us surrounded.)
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To: nickcarraway

I enjoy gardening though the weeds usually win. I really wish the President or Homeland Security would push this concept. Americans need to be more independent in the event of a crisis.


8 posted on 01/10/2009 6:16:01 PM PST by TSgt (Extreme vitriol and rancorous replies served daily. - Mike W USAF)
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To: Cindy

Are you implying that my dogs have totally trashed the back yard, and other than the pool....

:)
:)
:)

THANKS for the links!


9 posted on 01/10/2009 6:17:10 PM PST by Bradís Gramma ( PRAY! Pray for Israel. Pray for the US.)
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To: Brad's Gramma

Great site, THANKS!


10 posted on 01/10/2009 6:17:19 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: anonsquared

See Cindy’s link in #6, too..


11 posted on 01/10/2009 6:17:57 PM PST by Bradís Gramma ( PRAY! Pray for Israel. Pray for the US.)
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To: Farmer Dean

I don’t spray and actually end up with more peaches, apples, pears, and cherries than people in town who do spray.

Something tells me the bees prefer my garden.


12 posted on 01/10/2009 6:19:42 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: nickcarraway

There’s wild fruit, free for the picking: raspberries, blackberries, blueberries. In urban areas, such as Boston, the large cemeteries are a great place to find wild berries.


13 posted on 01/10/2009 6:22:40 PM PST by LibFreeOrDie (Obama promised a gold mine, but he will give us the shaft.)
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To: MikeWUSAF

Try raised beds. I built mine using 1x12 inch cedar planks. I stacked them two high and not only does it keep the weed seeds from blowing in, I can harvest without bending.


14 posted on 01/10/2009 6:23:03 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: nickcarraway

I remember our victory garden. Neighbors planted it and shared the food...it would have been 1943.


15 posted on 01/10/2009 6:23:31 PM PST by lonestar
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To: anonsquared

Something tells me you’re right.

Good pruning and keeping weeds and debris away from the trees might be your secret.


16 posted on 01/10/2009 6:26:08 PM PST by Cindy
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To: anonsquared
Yup. I plant a garden every year. Roma tomatoes, bell peppers, yellow squash, and whatever else I feel like. I also put in a bed for the wife to grow strawberries, and we have two blueberry and one gold harvest raspberry plant. About eight years ago, I put in a Granny Smith apple sapling, and now it's about 13 or 14 feet tall. We harvested more apples right in front of our door than we knew what to do with last year. The wife was canning homemade applesauce, apple butter, apple pie in a jar, and all manner of things for weeks. I started inviting the neighbors over to pick their own.


17 posted on 01/10/2009 6:27:00 PM PST by Viking2002 (Let's be proactive and start the impeachment NOW.)
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To: MikeWUSAF

You might try some of that black plastic covering in the rows. The space between the rows can be controled with a good rototiller.


18 posted on 01/10/2009 6:28:17 PM PST by Farmer Dean (168 grains of instant conflict resolution)
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To: LibFreeOrDie

“There’s wild fruit, free for the picking...”

Amen to that! There’s also an awful lot to eat from the average un-treated lawn.

My BIL found a ton of wild grapes along a busy local highway on year. He picked them, then gave everyone in the family a jar of ‘Traffic Jam.’ LOL! Clever. :)


19 posted on 01/10/2009 6:28:22 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin ('Taking the moderate path of appeasement leads to abysmal defeat.' - Rush on 11/05/08)
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To: anonsquared
Thanks!

I always hated that guy from the Victory Garden. His beds were always perfect! ;)


20 posted on 01/10/2009 6:28:42 PM PST by TSgt (Extreme vitriol and rancorous replies served daily. - Mike W USAF)
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To: Brad's Gramma

Thanks! Great link. :)

Here’s another family that really ‘walks the walk’ while making a buck off of the rest of us, of course. ;)

http://www.pathtofreedom.com


21 posted on 01/10/2009 6:31:47 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin ('Taking the moderate path of appeasement leads to abysmal defeat.' - Rush on 11/05/08)
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To: Viking2002

Did you know that the ‘Granny Smith’ apple originated in Australia? It was accidentally bred by “Granny Smith’ who was an orchid breeder. I don’t know all of the mechanics of it, but you somehow need apple seeds or blossoms to breed new orchids.

Anyhow, my brain-pan holds useless data like that. And Freepers are always welcome to it, LOL!


22 posted on 01/10/2009 6:34:42 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin ('Taking the moderate path of appeasement leads to abysmal defeat.' - Rush on 11/05/08)
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To: nickcarraway

Mmmm. Would sell a lot of tillers.


23 posted on 01/10/2009 6:34:54 PM PST by dr_who
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To: MikeWUSAF

Use six 1x12s that are eight feet long. Stack two for each long side and cut the other two in half and stack and voila, you have a 8’ by 4’ raised bed. (I used 1x1s in the corners.)

Be sure to tack galvanized screening to the bottom to keep out the gophers.


24 posted on 01/10/2009 6:37:59 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: nickcarraway

I started mine two years ago. Will continue to do so for the rest of my life, health permitting.


25 posted on 01/10/2009 6:39:01 PM PST by mysterio
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To: Viking2002

Sounds yummy! You may want to check out http://www.groworganic.com

Peaceful Valley Farm and Garden Supply offers multi-fruit trees so you can get three kinds of apples, peaches, or pears on one grafted tree.

http://groworganic.com/search.html?pCommand=DoSearch&pMode=Search&sText=multi%20fruit&sCategory=catalog


26 posted on 01/10/2009 6:44:10 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: anonsquared
“I see many positive aspects of encouraging victory gardens today. “

Although I don't refer to mine as a victory garden I do enjoy gardening. The biggest problem is crabgrass. Fight it all spring and summer. Have never found the answer as to how to get rid of it.

27 posted on 01/10/2009 6:44:22 PM PST by jerry639 (Obama=false hope for delusional followers.)
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To: Brad's Gramma; Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; ...

(Victory) Garden Ping!!!!!!!!


28 posted on 01/10/2009 6:46:32 PM PST by Gabz
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To: anonsquared

What kind of soil do you use? Do you have a compost?


29 posted on 01/10/2009 6:47:01 PM PST by lonestar
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To: Diana in Wisconsin

Wow! GREAT GREAT inspiration!!! Pasadena, CA???

Thanks!!!!


30 posted on 01/10/2009 6:48:28 PM PST by Bradís Gramma ( PRAY! Pray for Israel. Pray for the US.)
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To: jerry639

Before I built my raised beds and eliminated my weed problem, I had some success using layers of newspapers (black and white only/no colored print) to block weeds between rows and around plants. About seven sheets works best and it decomposes through the season and softens up clay soil. Lay it down, wet it, and throw a bit of soil over to cover.


31 posted on 01/10/2009 6:50:23 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
That's an interesting factoid. All I know is, my mother has sworn by Granny Smith apples as the best all-around cooking and baking apple for over 60 years. Truth be told, I'd thought that I'd planted a Stayman Winesap - that's what the nursery tag said - but didn't find out otherwise, until the fruit started coming in about three or four years ago. The first year, I let the damn things hang on the branches until they rotted, because I kept expecting them to turn red. LOL Last year was the first year the tree really produced - it was just a bowl full for the first couple of seasons. Last year, it finally went nuts. But, I grew up in apple country, so it's a point of pride to own my own, personal apple tree, right in front of my door. I think this year I'll keeps some seeds, and see about germinating some seedlings, 'cuz this tree is a keeper, genetically-speaking.


32 posted on 01/10/2009 6:56:52 PM PST by Viking2002 (Let's be proactive and start the impeachment NOW.)
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To: luckystarmom

Make a bean pole tee pee for them. They’ll have a blast.


33 posted on 01/10/2009 6:57:33 PM PST by hedgetrimmer
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To: lonestar

I have two acres that used to be part of a cattle ranch. I do compost just by throwing all the garden scraps in a huge pile under an oak tree every fall. By spring I pull off the top layer and enjoy everything that is cooked underneath.

Every few years I take a plastic garbage can up to the garden store and get soil amendment that comes from crushed shells. It really adds to the soil, but it does produce mushrooms that may or may not be edible.


34 posted on 01/10/2009 6:57:58 PM PST by anonsquared
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To: Gabz; hiredhand

As stated before we learned from grandparents and parents long ago.....no need to bring back a victory garden. We still have ours !.......:o)


35 posted on 01/10/2009 6:58:14 PM PST by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
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To: nickcarraway

“think global, act local.”

/s


36 posted on 01/10/2009 7:01:11 PM PST by ken21 (people die and you never hear from them again.)
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To: anonsquared
You know, I live in central Alabama, and pecan trees literally grow like weeds around here. The squirrels get the nuts from my neighbor's tree, and bury them for the winter. The next spring, I find them growing EVERYWHERE in the yard. My Dachshunds learned to shell thin-walled nuts like peanuts, pecans, and walnuts when they were pups (dogs that love mixed nuts - go figure), and every fall, the back porch is usually coved in pecan shells, not to mention the odd shell I find in the house. They fall out of the tree on our side of the fence, and they cart them off for a snack. LOL


37 posted on 01/10/2009 7:08:25 PM PST by Viking2002 (Let's be proactive and start the impeachment NOW.)
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To: Viking2002
The next spring, I find them growing EVERYWHERE in the yard.

Dig them up and mail them to me!!!!!!!!

The folks that I knew with pecan trees that kept me unlimitedly supplied have all passed away and now I don't know anyone with a pecan tree :(

38 posted on 01/10/2009 7:16:47 PM PST by Gabz
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To: nickcarraway
Been there and Done that since tending my Dads large gardens of the 30s and 40s then a break in the 50s and continually since then. We started cutting back last year when I hauled about 50 dozen Ball and Kerr canning jars to the Discovery Shop. We kept 50 dozen wide mouth pint and 1/2 pint jars for our own needs. We put Albacore Tuna up in the 1/2 pints.

There is not much of a savings when you start buying tillers and shredders. Once your soil is improved you can spade it in very little time

39 posted on 01/10/2009 7:29:27 PM PST by tubebender (Search continues for missing Tag line... More news at 11)
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To: anonsquared

Thanks, I try your suggestion.


40 posted on 01/10/2009 7:33:05 PM PST by jerry639 (Obama=false hope for delusional followers.)
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To: anonsquared
Thanks, I will try your suggestion.

Geeez! Think I need some rest.

41 posted on 01/10/2009 7:34:14 PM PST by jerry639 (Obama=false hope for delusional followers.)
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To: nickcarraway

A very interesting thread! In Miami, we have something called Sea Grapes. They get big and purple and are pretty sour but you can eat them. They grow all over the place. Also sugar cane is fun to munch on. Whats the quickest and sturdiest plant to grow for food? I do not have a green thumb at all...


42 posted on 01/10/2009 7:36:11 PM PST by FreeManWhoCan (An American in Miami)
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To: nickcarraway

43 posted on 01/10/2009 7:36:30 PM PST by JoeProBono (Apparitions are in the eye of the beholder)
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To: nickcarraway
Somehow, I can’’t envision the teenie boppers who elected Obama planting and tending gardens. Way too much work.
44 posted on 01/10/2009 7:37:25 PM PST by April Lexington (Study the constitution so you know what they are taking away!)
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To: MikeWUSAF

The REAL Mr. Victory Garden
James Underwood Crockett
http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb82/number500/JamesUnderwoodCrockett.jpg


45 posted on 01/10/2009 7:38:58 PM PST by KateUTWS ("Cogito, ergo freepum")
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To: nickcarraway

2 Problems here:

(1) HOA. Many “gated communities” frown on them.

(2) Deer. In residential neighborhoods, you just can’t kill ‘em. Sigh.


46 posted on 01/10/2009 7:44:15 PM PST by agrarianlady
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To: KateUTWS
Yep...I still have his books for old times sake. I stopped watching pBS after the garden shows went. I still try to catch Lawrence Welk and his one ana two ana can't believe I wrote that...
47 posted on 01/10/2009 7:54:52 PM PST by tubebender (Search continues for missing Tag line... More news at 11)
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To: nickcarraway

Self ping for later read.


48 posted on 01/10/2009 7:57:26 PM PST by conservative cat ("So this is how liberty dies... with thunderous applause.")
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To: LibFreeOrDie

“There’s wild fruit, free for the picking: raspberries, blackberries, blueberries..”

And usually it’s on some farmers’ fence rows.
On Government owned land it is illegal to just go picking fruit.

And then it’s not free, it’s theft.


49 posted on 01/10/2009 8:14:29 PM PST by RedMonqey
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To: agrarianlady; nickcarraway

We started working on our garden area yesterday! We have about a 3 acre section of our propety that was covered with dead standing trees. A bulldozer came and knocked the trees down, and we plan on burning them this week. Part of the area will be for a field for some work we do, another section will be for a garden.

The wildlife people told us how to deal with the deer. He said put up an electric fence and every few feet attach a piece of foil with peanut butter on it. The deer will take a taste and get a whole new appreciation for my neighbor’s garden!


50 posted on 01/10/2009 8:15:58 PM PST by Grammy
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