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Buddy Holly, rock music genius
CNN ^ | 2/3/09 | Don McLean

Posted on 02/03/2009 6:44:28 AM PST by DBCJR

...

Buddy's music is so musical. The number of great recordings he made in his very short life places him at or beyond the level of any musical artist in almost any category.

...

They are rock mountains that nobody has climbed. The diversity of Buddy's music is also profound. "Moondreams" and "True Love Ways" are musically as advanced as anything by the great popular composers. Gershwin or Berlin would have marveled at these compositions.

His electric guitars were raw, but controlled like bullwhips. They jingle and jangle freely in "That'll Be the Day" and "Oh Boy," and they snake around in "Words of Love."

The Beatles and the Stones became the behemoths they are on the back of Buddy Holly and the records he made before anyone made records or wrote songs like his. Aside from his geek image and his sudden and cruel death, his music is a wonder that still contains the potency of its original magic. Buddy was a genuine original. He was a genius.

Buddy's death, for me, an impressionable 13-year-old, delivering papers, was an enormous tragedy. The cover photo of the posthumously released "Buddy Holly Story" and "The Buddy Holly Story, Vol. 2," coupled with liner notes written by his widow, Maria, created a sense of grief that lived inside of me, until I was able to exorcize it with the opening verse of "American Pie."

...

Through my relationship with Buddy, I was able to discover my peculiar writing talent and, much to my amazement, help bring Buddy and his music back from the dead. In a sense, "American Pie" contains the spiritual connection to Buddy Holly that was always in me. It's as if we both gave each other new life.

(Excerpt) Read more at cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: buddy; holly
Wow, Holly did all that? I like his music but I can't say it was that profoundly impactful upon me.
1 posted on 02/03/2009 6:44:28 AM PST by DBCJR
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To: DBCJR

i believe Holly was, if not he inventor, at least the innovator of multi-track (layering) recording.

He was one of the first rockers to use string arrangements on his recordings.

So, he was the first to do many of the things we take for granted today.

I think a pretty decent songwriter for the time, but possibly remembered for being a charismatic performer and entertainer.


2 posted on 02/03/2009 6:50:51 AM PST by incredulous joe (When the winds of change blow hard enough, the most trivial of things can become deadly projectiles)
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To: DBCJR

McClean might be gushing a bit, but Holly was exceptional. He was just 22 when he died.


3 posted on 02/03/2009 6:50:54 AM PST by gracesdad
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To: DBCJR

“I like his music but I can’t say it was that profoundly impactful upon me.”

His music profoundly affected many of the artists you have heard since, I promise you.

Buddy Holly lives.


4 posted on 02/03/2009 6:51:38 AM PST by walford (http://the-big-pic.org)
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To: DBCJR
It was 50 years ago today that he met his untimely death. I can remember where I was when I learned that he (along with Richie Valens and the Big Bopper) had died.

His band 1st was called "Buddy Holly and the Crickets" and it seems I heard somewhere that is where the Beetles, big fans of Buddy, came up with their name.

5 posted on 02/03/2009 6:53:23 AM PST by TruthWillWin
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To: incredulous joe

Next to Buddy Holly the rest were definitly pikers.


6 posted on 02/03/2009 6:55:30 AM PST by .44 Special (Táimid Buarch)
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To: DBCJR
I have a box set of Buddy Holly songs and it really is amazing how good they still sound today. Of course they say dying tragically is always a good career move for a performing artist but had Buddy Holly lived, there is no doubt he would have kept on writing quality songs for decades to come because he did have a truckload of talent.

As for Don McLean, I always change the station when his "American Pie" comes on the radio. That sappy song really grates on my nerves for some reason.

7 posted on 02/03/2009 6:56:08 AM PST by SamAdams76 (I am 26 days away from outliving John F. Kennedy)
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To: .44 Special

“Rock’s been goin’downhill ever since Buddy Holly died”.
John Milner
American Graffiti


8 posted on 02/03/2009 6:59:55 AM PST by Dixiekraut (Rommel......you magnificent bastard....I READ YOUR BOOK !!!!)
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To: TruthWillWin

Buddy Holly died at Clear Lake, Iowa; thirteen miles from where I lived and I was thirteen at the time. It broke my heart. Clear Lake was named after a big swimming hole and was a teenage hangout for kids from Muscatine and Davenport. John M. & Jon C if you read this: Cathy’s Clown says hello.

Kathy if you read this, well I don’t know - once burned, once learned in my book. “Harold Roark”, aye Ayn?


9 posted on 02/03/2009 7:05:25 AM PST by .44 Special (Táimid Buarch)
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To: DBCJR

I like his music but is he really a mountain to climb?


10 posted on 02/03/2009 7:05:51 AM PST by autumnraine
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To: incredulous joe

Here in Lubbock, Tx, we salute Buddy Holly! It was actually HOLLEY!


11 posted on 02/03/2009 7:06:09 AM PST by JFC
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To: incredulous joe
Les Paul invented the multi-track overdubbing technique in the early 1950s. He didn't invest the electric guitar but paved the way for its use in rock and roll...
12 posted on 02/03/2009 7:08:56 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: incredulous joe
i believe Holly was, if not he inventor, at least the innovator of multi-track (layering) recording.

Actually, that would be Les Paul.

Not to take anything away from Buddy; his music touches me way down deep. We miss you, Buddy!
13 posted on 02/03/2009 7:09:23 AM PST by GodBlessRonaldReagan (Refugee from the World of Doomed Olsens)
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To: DBCJR
I also heard that Holly's widow just signed a new contract for the use of Holly's name and royalties in Lubbock Tx.

What a genius at such an early age. I do believe he would have been bigger than Elvis.

14 posted on 02/03/2009 7:16:32 AM PST by nbhunt
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To: TruthWillWin

Hell. the HOLLIES named themselves after Buddy [and did a really great “Peggy Sue Got Married” singing and playing backup to Buddy’s vocal on a tribute album].

The BEATLES did “Words of Love” on one of their LPs. The SEARCHERS used a lot of his stuff in their early days. The Stones first U.S release was “Not Fade Away”.


15 posted on 02/03/2009 7:19:19 AM PST by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: autumnraine

Yep. One of the first [and most prolific] singer-songwriters. Invented his own sound. Produced [after spliiting with his original label] his own records. Used strings [including some pizzacotto] on his records. Played everything from rockabillyto ballads to straight rock to blues. Did all of it well. Did all of it in less than four years.


16 posted on 02/03/2009 7:22:49 AM PST by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: DBCJR

R.I.P. to the true “King of Rock n’ Roll.


17 posted on 02/03/2009 7:23:45 AM PST by PzLdr ("The Emperor is not as forgiving as I am" - Darth Vader)
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To: PzLdr

There is no doubt he was brilliant! I didn’t mean that. I just meant the gushing seemed a little overboard.


18 posted on 02/03/2009 7:23:50 AM PST by autumnraine
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To: nbhunt

Nah. Alot of what made Elvis famous was his good looks and sex appeal. While Buddy Holly wasn’t ugly, he wasn’t Elvis circa 1957 either.


19 posted on 02/03/2009 7:24:36 AM PST by autumnraine
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To: incredulous joe
He was one of the first rockers to use string arrangements on his recordings.

Big mistake on his part. He was starting to go the way Elvis did, moving from pure rock'n'roll to manufactured pap. I suspect his career had peaked and would have soon been on the downslope. Today, he would be doing the oldies circuit like so many of his contemporaries.

20 posted on 02/03/2009 7:31:19 AM PST by Fresh Wind (Hey, Obama! Where's my check?)
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To: Fresh Wind

bttt


21 posted on 02/03/2009 7:32:10 AM PST by ConservativeMan55
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To: DBCJR
I can safely say that Buddy Holly has had no influence on me :)

But seriously...50 years on he is still part of rock's iconography with the glasses and the Stratocaster to say nothing of his music which matured and changed an astonishing amount.

Holly's chords-only guitar solo in 'Peggy Sue' is 1,000 times more interesting and appealing to me than any maimed-cat wailing produced by Jimi Hendrix.

22 years old. That in itself is staggering for what he achieved especially when you consider the stovepipe bureaucracy that was the record business at that time....real rock n roll was being viewed as a threat and the Fabians and Paul Ankas were being trotted out as the safe alternative. As a white man Holly didn't face the same hurdles as Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley or Little Richard but Holly had his mischievous and 'real' side also...he was 22!!!

Norman Petty certainly took advantage of Holly at times by changing songwriting credits in order to receive royalties but Petty was willing and able to provide the studio time and energy that might not have been otherwise available to a young buck (similar to Sam Phillips' efforts with Elvis).

A realist will admit that his move to NYC and proximity to that record business already had him changing direction from rockabilly & guitar-based pop to the strings-n-ballads side of the fence but who knows if he would have remained there.

22 posted on 02/03/2009 7:32:58 AM PST by relictele
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To: nbhunt

23 posted on 02/03/2009 7:52:26 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true.)
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To: DBCJR

True Love Ways is still AMAZING!! Had he lived, I think he would have gone on to be a true innovator & awesome producer.


24 posted on 02/03/2009 10:21:04 AM PST by stylecouncilor (I'm a loner Dottie; a rebel.)
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To: stylecouncilor

Yep, that is a good one. How about romantic denial in “That’ll Be The Day”?


25 posted on 02/03/2009 1:09:43 PM PST by DBCJR (What would you expect?)
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To: relictele

He did bring rythm guitar to the forefront.


26 posted on 02/03/2009 1:12:31 PM PST by DBCJR (What would you expect?)
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To: stylecouncilor
True Love Wayss is a masterpiece!

Try to find the Re-Mastered version title of his 20 Hits "From the Original Tapes" that was remastered by Steve Hoffman on MCA. TLW is last track and has some studio chatter at the beginning so you get a sense of the studio dynamics. REALLLY AWESOME SOUND on this CD, too!!!

This BH "Hits" complilation was Steve's first commercial remastering in the 80's on MCA and created the entire "Remastering from original tapes" industry.

27 posted on 02/03/2009 1:40:08 PM PST by newfreep ("Liberalism is just Communism sold by the drink." - P.J. O'Rourke)
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To: newfreep

That sounds great! I’ll check it out. Thanks!


28 posted on 02/03/2009 1:52:32 PM PST by stylecouncilor (I'm a loner Dottie; a rebel.)
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To: stylecouncilor
Steve's mastering version is out of print so it's hard to find. Easily THE best sounding version of any BH album. If you have problems finding, contact me and I may be able to help you.

Here is Amazon's link of the album but there are different versions. Be sure to find Steve's for the best sounding CD.

29 posted on 02/03/2009 1:59:32 PM PST by newfreep ("Liberalism is just Communism sold by the drink." - P.J. O'Rourke)
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To: newfreep

http://www.amazon.com/Original-Master-Tapes-Buddy-Holly/dp/B000002O1U/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1233698208&sr=8-3


30 posted on 02/03/2009 2:00:19 PM PST by newfreep ("Liberalism is just Communism sold by the drink." - P.J. O'Rourke)
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