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'Genius existed on the prairies 5,000 years ago'[Canada]
The Canadian Press ^ | 31 Jan 2009 | Bob Weber

Posted on 02/03/2009 12:19:57 PM PST by BGHater

An academic maverick is challenging conventional wisdom on Canada’s prehistory by claiming an archeological site in southern Alberta is really a vast, open-air sun temple with a precise 5,000-year-old calendar predating England’s Stonehenge and Egypt’s pyramids.

Mainstream archeologists consider the rock-encircled cairn to be just another medicine wheel left behind by early aboriginals. But a new book by retired University of Alberta professor Gordon Freeman says it is in fact the centre of a 26-square-kilometre stone “lacework” that marks the changing seasons and the phases of the moon with greater accuracy than our current calendar.

“Genius existed on the prairies 5,000 years ago,” says Freeman,the widely published former head of the university’s physical and theoretical chemistry department.

Freeman’s fascination with prairie prehistory dates back to his Saskatchewan boyhood.He and his father would comb the short grasses of the plains in search of artifacts exposed by the scouring wind.That curiosity never left him and he returned to it as he prepared to retire from active teaching.

Looking for a hobby, he asked a friend with an interest in history to suggest a few intriguing sites to visit. On a warm late-August day in 1980, that list drew him to what he has come to call Canada’s Stonehenge,which is also the title of his book.

A central cairn atop one of a series of low hills overlooking the Bow River, about 70 kilometres east of Calgary, had been partially excavated in 1971 and dated at about 5,000 years old. But as he approached it, Freeman strongly felt there was much more there than previously thought.

“As we walked toward the hilltop,I saw all kinds of patterns in the rocks on the way up. As I walked around the hilltop, I could see patterns that I doubted very much were accidental.”

(Excerpt) Read more at cnews.canoe.ca ...


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: archaeoastronomy; calendar; canada; godsgravesglyphs; megalith; megaliths; stones

An aerial view of a 5,000-year-old stone cairn and other structures in southern Alberta that a maverick Edmonton scientist believes are the central features of an ancient sun temple and calendar that accurately marks the solstices and the equinoxes.
1 posted on 02/03/2009 12:19:57 PM PST by BGHater
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To: SunkenCiv

Ping, aye.


2 posted on 02/03/2009 12:20:21 PM PST by BGHater (Tyranny is always better organised than freedom)
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To: BGHater

See what was done before the couch potato!


3 posted on 02/03/2009 12:24:41 PM PST by bgill
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To: BGHater

Yeah,,,those indian genuises again. Sitting in the middle of a circle, but never invented the wheel.

Sitting in that circle,,, cant you hear the talk? “dude,,,theres got to be a better way to transport things than dragging it on 2 poles.”


4 posted on 02/03/2009 12:25:05 PM PST by DesertRhino (Dogs earn the title of "man's best friend", Muslims hate dogs,,add that up.)
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To: BGHater

Seems I’ve seen that sort of configuration before... but where? Hmmmmm......

Dear, come take a look....

Oh yeah! Now I’ve got it.


5 posted on 02/03/2009 12:25:53 PM PST by Uncle Miltie (Congress declares a National Dividend in the amount of $9,000 per taxpayer instead of Porkulus.)
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To: BGHater
“Genius existed on the prairies 5,000 years ago,” says Freeman

Yeh, but back then "genius" was a bow and arrow instead of a hand thrown, or stabbing, spear.

Did mankind know about seasons, phases of the moon, etc?
Sure they did, it was all around them. They marked the spring summer, fall, and winter equinoxes. It is pretty much a given that when the sun stops drifting in one direction and starts going in reverse that someone is going to notice.
Eventually someone will make the discovery that so many days after one of these events the plants start budding and growing, or so many days after another of these events it gets colder.

That's not genius, that's attention to detail.

6 posted on 02/03/2009 12:27:19 PM PST by Just another Joe (Warning: FReeping can be addictive and helpful to your mental health)
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To: BGHater

stones marking the time, particularly the time for planting are apparently very common. No genius, just someone who figured out that it would be easier to find out beforehand when the next planting season begun.


7 posted on 02/03/2009 12:28:53 PM PST by texmexis best (uency)
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To: BGHater; GMMAC; Clive; exg; kanawa; backhoe; -YYZ-; Former Proud Canadian; Squawk 8888; ...

8 posted on 02/03/2009 12:32:12 PM PST by fanfan
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To: BGHater

I thought Dr. Gordon Freeman was an astrophysicist... HL Rules!


9 posted on 02/03/2009 12:34:38 PM PST by Camel Joe ("All animals are created equal, but some animals are more equal than others"- The Pigs)
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To: DesertRhino
They never used the wheel for transport -- yet, the ancient Mayans had wheeled toys (the one on the right, below).


10 posted on 02/03/2009 12:56:06 PM PST by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA
I guarantee that most people don't realize that the most successful ship design of all time came 1000 years before the Europeans came close and it still exists in widespread use today.

Most people will say it's junk and I'll have to agree.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Genius is subjective.
11 posted on 02/03/2009 1:04:26 PM PST by cripplecreek (The poor bastards have us surrounded.)
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To: Just another Joe
That's not genius, that's attention to detail.

Mostly genius is good pattern detection.

12 posted on 02/03/2009 1:04:28 PM PST by Reeses (Leftism is powered by the evil force of envy.)
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To: Camel Joe
Got crowbar?


13 posted on 02/03/2009 1:06:54 PM PST by Andonius_99 (There are two sides to every issue. One is right, the other is wrong; but the middle is always evil.)
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To: cripplecreek

It’s a beautiful ship & one like it might have carried the technology for wheeled toys from the orient to the “New World”.


14 posted on 02/03/2009 1:07:54 PM PST by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

The History Channel ran a show about chinese shipbuilding technology of the past. They understood how to make large (300 foot) oceangoing vessels that were strong enough to take the stresses of open ocean waves. They simply built double hulls and filled them with a form of concrete to stiffen them.

It’s easy for us to say someone else was stupid for not coming up with something we’ve lived our entire lives with (like wheels) But if we had never encountered that technology we might be a thousand years away from it now.


15 posted on 02/03/2009 1:16:54 PM PST by cripplecreek (The poor bastards have us surrounded.)
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

ROFLMAO... the answer was all around them. guess thats how it is when youre a genius.


16 posted on 02/03/2009 1:18:14 PM PST by DesertRhino (Dogs earn the title of "man's best friend", Muslims hate dogs,,add that up.)
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To: BGHater

Man’s been smart since God made him.

Ok well lately we’ve gone ‘round the bend and elected Obama.


17 posted on 02/03/2009 1:19:48 PM PST by festus (Politics makes for strange bedfellows)
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18 posted on 02/03/2009 1:27:47 PM PST by StAnDeliver
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To: BGHater

I hate to say it, but I am not overly impressed.


19 posted on 02/03/2009 1:30:36 PM PST by MeanWestTexan (Beware Obama's Reichstag fire.)
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To: cripplecreek
I'm lookin' at your junk.
20 posted on 02/03/2009 1:38:07 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Alps !"~~)
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To: cripplecreek
“It’s easy for us to say someone else was stupid for not coming up with something we’ve lived our entire lives with (like wheels) ....”

I would never suggest it was stupidity. It's more likely that no one saw the need for a them. Just a few decades ago, almost nobody thought people needed a home computer — let alone one that fits in a shirt pocket.

21 posted on 02/03/2009 2:09:51 PM PST by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

Priorities drive invention. Most native Americans were at least semi nomadic which means they didn’t really make roads over time. I suspect the travois was just as effective over rough ground as wheels.

After all, I use a wheel barrel here in the yard just fine but I really don’t want to try pushing it through the woods.


22 posted on 02/03/2009 2:16:58 PM PST by cripplecreek (The poor bastards have us surrounded.)
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To: Andonius_99

Ever played DOD?


23 posted on 02/03/2009 2:26:31 PM PST by Camel Joe ("All animals are created equal, but some animals are more equal than others"- The Pigs)
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

Strange the wheels of the toy on the left even seem to have a spoke detail the you might see on a full size wooden wagon wheels like they knew all the concepts... Hmm maybe the Mayans had some unknown odd taboo about wheels and their uses


24 posted on 02/03/2009 2:47:01 PM PST by tophat9000 ( We are "O" so f---ed)
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

No horses or decent draft animals was why no great carts. (Llamas are OK, but not exactly oxen.)

Plus, their territory was awfully mountainous, further limiting usefulness.


25 posted on 02/03/2009 3:35:08 PM PST by MeanWestTexan (Beware Obama's Reichstag fire.)
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To: BGHater; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic ·

 
Gods
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Glyphs
Thanks BGHater.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

· Google · Archaeologica · ArchaeoBlog · Archaeology · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Discover · Nat Geographic · Texas AM Anthro News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo ·
· The Archaeology Channel · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


26 posted on 02/03/2009 5:02:36 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/____________________ Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
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To: cripplecreek

Zheng He’s fleet, and the ships in it, were on a scale that wasn’t matched until the 20th century. There are populations of Chinese ancestry on African islands from one of his ships that wrecked. His voyages put Marco Polo to shame, and some folks believe he even reached the New World.

The Ming government ordered his ships burned and his records destroyed in the belief that China had all the wisdom the world had to offer and all this running around was a waste of time. Which leads to an important point: The critical prerequisite for discovery is curiosity.


27 posted on 02/03/2009 5:30:06 PM PST by ReignOfError
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To: ReignOfError

The world would be a very different place if China hadn’t managed to end up with some really ignorant egocentric rulers along the way.

The great First Emperor did major damage to China’s future when his paranoia drove him to destroy records of things rulers before himself had done.


28 posted on 02/03/2009 6:00:27 PM PST by cripplecreek (The poor bastards have us surrounded.)
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To: Andonius_99

My thoughts exactly!


29 posted on 02/03/2009 6:24:53 PM PST by AntiKev ("Within the strangest people, truth can find the strangest home." - Great Big Sea - Company of Fools)
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To: cripplecreek

China and Europe were on about an equal footing in 1000 A.D., with other civilizations not far behind. Europe had a few factors in it’s favor early in the second millenium — competition among peoples locally, a religion that encouraged finding new places to proselytize. Some scholars even posit that the Black Death, in giving Europe a drop in population and hence excess productive capacity, led to the free time needed to cook up the Renaissance.


30 posted on 02/03/2009 6:50:09 PM PST by ReignOfError
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

Odd.


31 posted on 02/04/2009 2:13:15 AM PST by Impy (RED=COMMUNIST, NOT REPUBLICAN)
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To: Impy; MeanWestTexan
That's what I thought, when I first saw pre-Columbian wheeled toys in the national museum in Mexico City.

MeanWestTexan offers a plausible explanation in post 25, above.

I think nearly everyone just takes their culture (including all the technology) for granted, and rolls (ahem) with it. In traditional societies everywhere, there wasn't a notion of "progress". People didn't ask “is there a better way". Even today, there are huge differences in inventiveness between cultures. Compare the U.S. to nearly anywhere. Or, more dramatically, Israel to everyone else in their neighbourhood.

32 posted on 02/04/2009 8:37:07 AM PST by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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To: USFRIENDINVICTORIA

More interesting to me besides the wheel (which, again, I view as a product of terrain and lack of draft animals) is the lack of pulley, block-and-pulley and the like.

This would have been of great use in mountainous terrain and for building their elaborate stone structures.

As in, “how do you get the rock to the top?”

It appears, they built earthworks around the structures and pushed and pulled (probably on logs, which are akin to wheels, and better since a double-axle cart would break), which is primarily what the Egyptians did.

But still -— a pulley is a force mutiplier extraordinaire.

I suppose that is a factor of lack of ships and sails, which is where our pulley thinking came about.


33 posted on 02/04/2009 8:54:56 AM PST by MeanWestTexan (Beware Obama's Reichstag fire.)
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To: ReignOfError
"Which leads to an important point: The critical prerequisite for discovery is curiosity."

...but the moral to the story is that government intervention always eventually results in decay.

34 posted on 02/04/2009 8:07:46 PM PST by gnarledmaw (Hive-mind liberals worship "leaders". Sovereign conservatives elect servants.)
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To: gnarledmaw
...but the moral to the story is that government intervention always eventually results in decay.

Bit overbroad, don't you think? A partial list of government-sponsored expeditions:
Columbus
Magellan
Drake
Cook
Lewis & Clark
Apollo
Voyager
Viking

35 posted on 02/04/2009 10:36:31 PM PST by ReignOfError
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To: DesertRhino
Sitting in the middle of a circle, but never invented the wheel

While prairie looks flat, a lot of it is not, and is in fact punctuated by deep draws and badlands terrain. Wheels would not fare as well in such an environment as the travois did, and the travois had the added benefit of utilizing the lodgepoles for the 'house' en route, making something which would have been freight useful as part of the transport device.

YMMV, but crossing the countryside out here with wheels would have been far tougher (wheels need roads).

36 posted on 02/04/2009 11:30:23 PM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Just another Joe

......that’s attention to detail.....

It is science..... the study of the heavens


37 posted on 02/05/2009 5:01:42 AM PST by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 . The original point of America was not to be Europe)
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To: MeanWestTexan; USFRIENDINVICTORIA

Interesting stuff.

Can’t blame them for not figuring stuff out.

I’d be eating mushrooms and raw meat in a cave for 100 years before I’d discover cooking.


38 posted on 02/05/2009 5:38:12 AM PST by Impy (RED=COMMUNIST, NOT REPUBLICAN)
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To: ReignOfError

Government was then a private organization (a royal family) seeking profit. Capitalistic gubmint.


39 posted on 02/05/2009 7:14:37 AM PST by MeanWestTexan (Beware Obama's Reichstag fire.)
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