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Grady Towers has given permission to redistribute his work "just tell them to spell my name correctly" here: http://www.eskimo.com/~miyaguch/grady/emptypromise.html
1 posted on 05/02/2009 5:59:31 PM PDT by coloradan
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To: coloradan
We now know that there are two: one called fluid g, measured by culture fair tests such as the Raven Progressive Matrices or the LAIT, and another called crystallized g, measured by culture loaded tests like the Concept Mastery Test or the Miller Analogies Test.

Sigh.

I get so tired of this. Reality consists of what we have developed the ability to measure. (Or more accurately, what we believe we can measure.)

If we cannot measure it, it does not exist. This is remarkably like looking for your car keys under the streetlight even though you dropped them in the shadow.

2 posted on 05/02/2009 6:06:55 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Everyone has a right to his own opinion, but not to his own facts.)
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To: coloradan
Too many notes


3 posted on 05/02/2009 6:08:57 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: coloradan; Carry_Okie; hiredhand

Brain drain read........;o)

I like it !


4 posted on 05/02/2009 6:09:31 PM PDT by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
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To: coloradan
Nevertheless, there has been a recent resurgence of interest in these theories among some younger psychometricians who either do not understand factor analysis, or simply refuse to accept its results. One such theorist is Howard Gardner.

THANK YOU!

14 posted on 05/02/2009 6:46:55 PM PDT by Excellence (What Madoff is to finance Gore is to global warming.)
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To: coloradan

The correct answer is 42.


16 posted on 05/02/2009 7:02:14 PM PDT by eclecticEel ("Envy is always referred to by its political alias, 'social justice.' " - T. Sowell)
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To: coloradan
"or in more everyday terms, the abilities for inductive ("relations") and deductive ("correlates") reasoning."

I find it hard to value the opinion of an writer upon this subject who confuses fundamental terms. As anyone with any sort of classical education would know, these terms are reversed. Induction evaluates correlations and deduction evaluates relationships.

The use of strongly correlating positives to indicate a likely truth is the very meat of the inductive process. If a brief review of recorded rainfall fairly matches my personal recollection of coming home to find a wet front lawn, then tomorrow's discovery of a wet lawn would, inductively, suggest that there had been rain (though there is a remote possibility that the wife watered the lawn). Pure induction does not consider relationship. The best demonstrative example to which I can point is Al Gore's famous CO2 chart. He graphically plots a parallel between CO2 levels and global temperatures without considering the relationship (causative, with CO2 chasing temperature). He uses an inductive argument to suggest a relationship which his induction does not actually indicate. Such is the nature of the inductive method.

Deduction, on the other hand, consists of describing and evaluating the relationship of the various objects of study through a series of propositions. The discharge of a deductive argument, in fact, is a process of evaluating the relationships existing among the propositions themselves. If I know, priori, that there is a causative relationship between water and grass such that water makes grass grow (oversimplified of the purpose of argument), then the evaluation of that causative relationship by way of modus tollens (hey, it didn't rain and you didn't water the lawn - now the grass is brown) and modus ponens (I don't know if you watered the lawn or if it just rained, but the grass looks great) indicates that I should probably tell the wife to water the lawn on dry days IF I desire grass growth.

This article altogether reads as though it were written by someone with Aspergers, which it likely was.

19 posted on 05/02/2009 7:54:33 PM PDT by Brass Lamp
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To: coloradan

The allegation that Mensa uses ONLY “culture-loaded” tests is simply false!

As a Mensa test Proctor, I administered a “CULTURE FAIR” test battery (3 tests) to two candidates on the morning of April 25, and a colleague tested 3 more candidates with the standard test battery in the afternoon. This was the second time I administered a CF battery this year.

We do not allow any candidates to re-take any test, but they can be admitted based on a qualifying score on any ONE of over 200 different tests of general intelligence - including the 5 that we administer.

Any candidate can elect to take the culture fair test, or (for a new $40 test fee) can take the alternate test battery for a second attempt to qualify. However, the CFB takes longer and is more expensive for us to give, so we prefer to offer the standard battery.


20 posted on 05/02/2009 7:58:41 PM PDT by MainFrame65 (The US Senate: World's greatest PREVARICATIVE body!.)
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To: coloradan

Yeah right. The use of extended vocabularies is often to exclude those who are not in the ‘inner circle of knowledge’. This is the kind of crap that passes of ‘real science’. Linguistic specialties, game theorists, educators, politicians ....they all love to sound much brighter than any of them really are. None of them could find their rear end with both hands in their back pockets.


22 posted on 05/02/2009 8:07:23 PM PDT by the long march
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To: coloradan
When I was doing Revolutionary Planning, I found that those with high Componential intelligence were quite common, those with high Contextual intelligence (street smart) were very common, but those with high Experiential intelligence were exceedingly rare. Far more rare than one would imagine with all the hype around thinking outside the box. And those who could provide Revolutionary Ideas were painfully small in number. And quite scary to me, was the fact that virtually none of the mega brains could tell the difference between a good idea and a revolutionary idea. This is a problem I face on a regular basis.
26 posted on 05/02/2009 8:37:22 PM PDT by Revolutionary ("Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition!")
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To: coloradan

The bear was white.

The only place you can walk 5 miles east, 5 miles north, and return to camp is at the North Pole. (Spherical geometry versus planar geometry). At the North Pole, the bear would have to be a polar bear, and I believe they are white.

I think this is a trick question.


29 posted on 05/02/2009 10:05:49 PM PDT by Pearls Before Swine (Is /sarc really necessary?)
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To: coloradan

Aren’t intelligence tests limited by the intelligence of the people who create them?


33 posted on 05/03/2009 5:27:50 AM PDT by MantillaMilitant
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