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To: Smokin' Joe
I agree with everything you posted - especially the oil change. It's cheap. The one thing I found different is that my 1983 F-250 with a 460 is the most cold blooded vehicle I have ever seen. Takes it 20 minutes to warm up even a little. Put a 190 degree thermostat in it didn't help.
28 posted on 10/25/2009 3:14:27 PM PDT by mad_as_he$$ (Beneath this mask there is an idea, Mr. Creedy, and ideas are bulletproof. V for victory)
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To: mad_as_he$$
I'm surprised the thermostat did not do it. Most are only 160 or 180 degrees for the 460, so it should have helped.

My wife has a '78 Lincoln which only takes about 5 minutes idling at the curb to warm up.

I'm not sure what temperature ranges you are dealing with, but if you commonly have temps below freezing and occasionally below zero, you might consider getting a block heater (frost plug heater) or a tank heater for the pickup. If there is no available electrical outlet, the easiest and cheapest fix is to get a grille cover to partially block airflow to the radiator (yes, it can be done with a piece of cardboard), but don't overdo it if you live in an area where winter temperatures are commonly above freezing (or if you operate the vehicle for long periods of time under load) or you might overheat the engine, which is far worse than being chilly for a few extra minutes.

I have used both methods in concert, and the coldest weather I ever drove in was -54 out of Riverton, Wyoming (static air temp, not wind chill). It took over 100 miles before I could not see my breath in the van, at about 200 miles (driving north into warmer weather (only -30) I could unzip my coat some and think about taking my gloves off inside the vehicle. Covering the entire grille helped a little, and I never would have started the engine without a crankcase full of synthetic oil (easier cranking and better oil flow at startup) and the frost plug heater to warm the engine up before I started it.

If you are running a manual transmission in temperatures below zero, you might consider replacing the gear lube and differential lube with synthetic as well, it makes a huge difference getting going and saves clutch in the long run.

32 posted on 10/25/2009 8:10:01 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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