Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Two more awesome pictures from the Enceladus flyby
Planetary.org ^ | Nov. 22, 2009

Posted on 11/23/2009 3:52:25 PM PST by Daffynition

I'm getting to be a broken record here, but I can't stop looking at these photos from the Enceladus flyby. This first one I put together from two of the south polar plume images – you can see all four of the tiger stripes, and the plumes issuing from them, in this wide shot. I mosaicked two images, matching their levels, rotated them 180 degrees to put "ground" at the bottom and "sky" at the top, and filled in a little of the background in the corner at lower right to fill out the whole image.

Enceladan south polar vents and plumes This mosaic consists of two frames on Enceladus' south pole, captured by Cassini during its close flyby on November 21, 2009. Plumes issue from all four of the large "tiger stripes" at Enceladus' south pole -- from left to right, they trace out Alexandria, Cairo, Baghdad, and, at the extreme right edge, Damascus sulci. Only a tiny sliver of Enceladus is sunlit; the plumes are visible on the nightside of Enceladus where they have reached high enough elevations to rise out of nightside shadow and receive sunlight. A concentric circular feature lies between Alexandria and Cairo sulci. It may be a chance alignment of fractures, or it may represent some geologic feature, either exogenic (an impact scar) or endogenic (a plume or sink of some sort). Further research is necessary! Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / mosaic by Emily Lakdawalla This other one was put together by Gordan Ugarkovic – Cassini flies into the plumes! Cooooool. Wish I could have been riding along. That would be one spectacular view.

This four-frame animation is composed of images captured by Cassini as it approached for its close flyby of Enceladus on November 21, 2009. The brightest plumes in this animation are along Damascus sulcus. Plumes along Baghdad sulcus are also visible at the beginning of the animation. Credit: NASA / JPL / SSI / animation by Gordan Ugarkovic


TOPICS: Astronomy; Science
KEYWORDS: astronomy; cassini; enceladus; science; xplanets

1 posted on 11/23/2009 3:52:25 PM PST by Daffynition
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Daffynition
Hey, thanks! We don't just do politics, I'm an astronomy buff, too.
2 posted on 11/23/2009 3:55:25 PM PST by JPG (Obama's plan for America...today, Labor Unions...tomorrow, Labor Camps.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition
Awesome !
3 posted on 11/23/2009 3:56:31 PM PST by steelyourfaith (Time to prosecute Al Gore now that fellow scam artist Bernie Madoff is in stir.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition

Nice! You can see which towns have a Firday Night Football game! /s


4 posted on 11/23/2009 4:00:27 PM PST by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition

Cool photos. Figured it must be a moon of some sort - found this on a search to fill in the blanks for me (and probably others):

Enceladus is the sixth-largest moon of Saturn.[14] It was discovered in 1789 by William Herschel.[15] Until the two Voyager spacecraft passed near it in the early 1980s, very little was known about this small moon besides the identification of water ice on its surface.

The Voyagers showed that the diameter of Enceladus is only 500 km, about a tenth of that of Saturn’s largest moon, Titan, and reflects almost 100% of the sunlight that strikes it. Voyager 1 found that Enceladus orbited in the densest part of Saturn’s diffuse E ring, indicating a possible association between the two, while Voyager 2 revealed that despite the moon’s small size, it had a wide range of terrains ranging from old, heavily cratered surfaces to young, tectonically deformed terrain, with some regions with surface ages as young as 100 million years old.

In 2005, the Cassini spacecraft began to acquire additional data on Enceladus, answering a number of the mysteries opened by the Voyager spacecraft and starting a few new ones. Cassini performed several close flybys of Enceladus, revealing the moon’s surface and environment in greater detail. In particular, the probe discovered a water-rich plume venting from the moon’s south polar region. This discovery, along with the presence of escaping internal heat and very few (if any) impact craters in the south polar region, shows that Enceladus is geologically active today.

Moons in the extensive satellite systems of gas giants often become trapped in orbital resonances that lead to forced libration or orbital eccentricity; proximity to the planet can then lead to tidal heating of the satellite’s interior, offering a possible explanation for the activity.

Enceladus is one of only three outer solar system bodies (along with Jupiter’s moon Io and Neptune’s moon Triton) where active eruptions have been observed. Analysis of the outgassing suggests that it originates from a body of sub-surface liquid water, which along with the unique chemistry found in the plume, has fueled speculations that Enceladus may be important in the study of astrobiology.[16] The discovery of the plume has added further weight to the argument that material released from Enceladus is the source of the E ring.


5 posted on 11/23/2009 4:01:24 PM PST by 21twelve (Drive Reality out with a pitchfork if you want , it always comes back.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition

6 posted on 11/23/2009 4:28:15 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition
Thanks for the post. My husband and I saw Cassini sitting in the clean room at JPL before launch way back when. Your post is not only informative, it brings back memories.
7 posted on 11/23/2009 4:39:17 PM PST by spaced
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 21twelve
Thanks. Great info.

More astrobiology and Mandelbulbs: The Unravelling of the Real 3D Mandelbulb

8 posted on 11/23/2009 4:54:08 PM PST by Daffynition (What's all this about hellfire and Dalmatians?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition; sig226; KevinDavis; annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; ...
Thanks Daffynition! Not strictly on-topic, but I'm sure this will be of interest.
 
X-Planets
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
Google news searches: exoplanet · exosolar · extrasolar ·

9 posted on 11/23/2009 7:18:28 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SunkenCiv

Outstanding.


10 posted on 11/23/2009 7:31:32 PM PST by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition

Thanks for posting. We need threads like this for a much needed break.


11 posted on 11/23/2009 7:45:28 PM PST by barker (Sarah Palin: Living In Obama's Head Rent Free - Palin 2012? You betcha!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: 21twelve

You may have Enceladus and Triton but Io is mine.


12 posted on 11/23/2009 7:47:34 PM PST by barker (Sarah Palin: Living In Obama's Head Rent Free - Palin 2012? You betcha!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition

Now that’s cool...


13 posted on 11/23/2009 7:49:43 PM PST by Knitting A Conundrum (Without the Constitution, there is no America!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Army Air Corps

Definitely.


14 posted on 11/23/2009 8:06:16 PM PST by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/__Since Jan 3, 2004__Profile updated Monday, January 12, 2009)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: null and void; fnord; Number57; KevinDavis; rdb3; MNJohnnie; RightWhale; proudofthesouth; ...

The top image of Enceladus is also today’s Astronomy Picture of the Day.


15 posted on 11/24/2009 5:39:47 AM PST by sig226 (Bring back Jimmy Carter!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sig226

In the animation, is the edge of the dark(er) area that progresses downward the terminator?


16 posted on 11/24/2009 5:53:56 AM PST by Roccus (My anger IS manufactured.......................................in the WHITE HOUSE and CONGRESS!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: 21twelve; Daffynition
Figured it must be a moon of some sort - found this on a search to fill in the blanks for me (and probably others):

Absolutely right! What especially threw me off were the names left to right, they trace out Alexandria, Cairo, Baghdad, and, at the extreme right edge, Damascus . With all the tension in the ME, I was prepared for the worst ;-)

Thank you for posting the details.

17 posted on 11/24/2009 6:38:44 AM PST by NYer ("One Who Prays Is Not Afraid; One Who Prays Is Never Alone" - Benedict XVI)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition

WOW! Spectacular! What an awesome solar system we live in!


18 posted on 11/24/2009 7:00:33 AM PST by ConfidentConservative (I think, therefore I am conservative.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition
Mmmm, Enceladus!

 
19 posted on 11/24/2009 7:05:02 AM PST by FreedomOfExpression
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Roccus; sig226

I’m not sure, but I think that’s twilight from the sunlight diffusing off the gas being spewed. The terminator is at the horizon. Someone correct me if I’m wrong.


20 posted on 11/24/2009 7:09:05 AM PST by TheOldLady
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: TheOldLady
I think you're right. I was thinking, no atmosphere should mean no twilight. I didn't take into account the diffusing gases.
21 posted on 11/24/2009 7:27:00 AM PST by Roccus (My anger IS manufactured.......................................in the WHITE HOUSE and CONGRESS!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Roccus

;-) and a bump.


22 posted on 11/24/2009 9:04:43 AM PST by TheOldLady
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: FreedomOfExpression

HAHAHA! Perfect~

Perfectly delicious, that is! ;-D


23 posted on 11/24/2009 12:18:52 PM PST by Daffynition (What's all this about hellfire and Dalmatians?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Daffynition; sig226
Thanks, I was afraid I had broken an unwritten rule by posting humorous (to me) pictures on an astronomy thread.
My mind went straight to “How do you pronounce that?” when I saw the name of the moon. I still don't know.

I do love the picture and animation of Enceladus. The plumes are an amazing sight! I hope they can add more frames to that animation later, if the camera kept taking pictures.

Thanks for the post, and thanks to sig for the ping!

24 posted on 11/24/2009 12:35:55 PM PST by FreedomOfExpression
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson