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Vanity - Book/Author Suggestions for a 12/13 y/o Girl
highimpact | 11/31/09 | highimpact

Posted on 12/01/2009 6:14:54 PM PST by highimpact

I'm seeking help finding a new author and/or book suggestions for my daughter for Christmas. She is 12 going on 13, and very smart (gifted student, genius IQ, home-schooled.) She is moving beyond her pre-teen books.

I'm looking for books/authors that are early adult, without graphic sexual/horror situations. She enjoys mystery, history (fiction or non-fiction), adventure, and romantic comedy. She is a big fan of Brian Jacques and Gail Carson Levine.


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Chit/Chat; Education
KEYWORDS: authors; books; girl; vanity
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Any help is greatly appreciated!
1 posted on 12/01/2009 6:14:55 PM PST by highimpact
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To: highimpact

My early reading tended more to Fantasy and Sci-fi, so that is what I am going to recommend.

Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings is great for a bright kid at that age or maybe Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card. Stephen Lawhead’s Pendragon Cycle is a retelling of the Authurian legends with a strong historical feel threaded through it and might be something she would enjoy.


2 posted on 12/01/2009 6:24:08 PM PST by Anitius Severinus Boethius
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To: highimpact

I think a great book (probably not for the holidays though, given the subject matter) would be the Diary of Anne Frank. I read it when I was that age. It was deeply moving.

The Hobbitt Series was a fun read.


3 posted on 12/01/2009 6:24:11 PM PST by Gapplega (j)
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To: highimpact

My nine year old is reading “The Hound of the Baskervilles” and loving it. She hated “Little Women” and dragged through it.

For fun, she was reading the Beacon Street Girls. They are written for Tweens. They are very much candyfloss, but they were cute and not objectionable.

I would suggest what my 12-year-old is reading, but I’m not sure how much your daughter likes Glenn Beck or Ann Coulter.
“Arguing with Idiots” is hilarious.


4 posted on 12/01/2009 6:28:24 PM PST by netmilsmom (I am Ilk)
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To: highimpact

Fiction: Watership Down by Richard Adams

Non-fiction: Into Thin Air by Jon Krakauer
The Corpse Had a Familar Face by Edna Buchanan

I especially recommend Edna Buchanan’s books. She used to be the crime reporter for the Miami Herald before she quit to write novels. She writes some of the best prose I’ve ever read, and says more in a few paragraphs than most writers say in a dozen pages.


5 posted on 12/01/2009 6:28:50 PM PST by Huntress (Who the hell are you to tell me what's in my best interests?)
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To: Gapplega

The Hobbitt/LOR series is a great suggestion. It never crossed my mind. I read it as well around that age. I don’t know about the Diary of Anne Frank. I’ve never read it. Would you recommend that book for a child who occasionally has nightmares (2-3 times a year)?


6 posted on 12/01/2009 6:29:47 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: highimpact

Also: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.


7 posted on 12/01/2009 6:30:19 PM PST by Huntress (Who the hell are you to tell me what's in my best interests?)
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To: highimpact

“The Velvet Room” by Zilpha Keatley Snyder. It’s a wonderful story and extremely well-written.


8 posted on 12/01/2009 6:31:24 PM PST by 6323cd (I Am Jim Thompson)
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To: Huntress

“I especially recommend Edna Buchanan’s books. She used to be the crime reporter for the Miami Herald before she quit to write novels. She writes some of the best prose I’ve ever read, and says more in a few paragraphs than most writers say in a dozen pages.”

Sounds like I might like her myself. I love true crime stories, and I hate flowery prose. What book would you suggest to start with?


9 posted on 12/01/2009 6:32:58 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: 6323cd

I will check it out. Thanks.


10 posted on 12/01/2009 6:33:47 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: Gapplega

The Once and Future King
T.S. White

Captains Courageous, Kim, The Light that Died
Rudyard Kipling (In fact, anything by Kipling)

The Honor Harrington series (Horatio Hornblower IN SPAAACE!!!!) Honor, duty, courage in a Royal Navy in the far future with good hard science mixed in. The Hero (heroine?) is female, and a great positive role model.
David Weber

The Hyperion series (Lots of philosophical insights but may be too advanced.)
Dan Simmons


11 posted on 12/01/2009 6:34:36 PM PST by Ronin
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To: Huntress

“Also: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.”

Good one. I read it 20 years ago. Thanks.


12 posted on 12/01/2009 6:35:59 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: All

What do you all think of the Isaac Asimov “Foundation” Trilogy? Too early for a 12 year old? She has never explored Sci-Fi before. I remember really enjoying those books when I was a teen.


13 posted on 12/01/2009 6:38:35 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: Ronin

I appreciate the suggestions. Thanks.


14 posted on 12/01/2009 6:39:23 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: highimpact

True Grit by Charles Portis
Seabiscuit by Laura Hillenbrand
The Golden Ocean by Patrick O’Brien
Beowulf trans. by Seamus Heaney
Podkayne of Mars by Robert Heinlein
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
some stories by Tolstoy


15 posted on 12/01/2009 6:40:36 PM PST by heartwood
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To: highimpact

“Prude” by Carol Platt Liebau.
‘How the Sex-Obsessed Culture Damages Girls’

You read it first!
Then decide how long you can afford to wait to have her read it.


16 posted on 12/01/2009 6:41:35 PM PST by G Larry (DNC is comprised of REGRESSIVES!)
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To: highimpact
Here's a good synopsis/review.
17 posted on 12/01/2009 6:42:15 PM PST by 6323cd (I Am Jim Thompson)
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To: highimpact

Start with The Corpse Had a Familar Face. It’s a collection of essays from her career as a reporter. There’s also a second collection of essays, but I don’t recall the title. Her novels are pretty good too. Most of them center on the Britt Montero character, who is, naturally a crime reporter in Miami.


18 posted on 12/01/2009 6:42:39 PM PST by Huntress (Who the hell are you to tell me what's in my best interests?)
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To: netmilsmom

“I would suggest what my 12-year-old is reading, but I’m not sure how much your daughter likes Glenn Beck or Ann Coulter.
“Arguing with Idiots” is hilarious.”

I have all the Ann Coulter books except that one. I enjoy them, but my daughter’s a bit young to start with the deeply political material. We watch Glenn Beck, and the kids disappear. They’re a couple years away from understanding the bigger picture he’s talking about. I appreciate your suggestions, though. Especially “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” I had completely forgotten about that book.


19 posted on 12/01/2009 6:45:09 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: highimpact
Here is a book I released not many weeks ago. However, she would really need to be up on current events to follow the story. I have a daughter that age also, but probably her, and most others at that age would need a few more years and an interest in religion and politics to keep up with it.


20 posted on 12/01/2009 6:45:34 PM PST by inpajamas (http://outskirtspress.com/ONE)
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To: highimpact

Enemy Women. A gripping story about women imprisoned during the Civil War. No sex, little violence. But strong.


21 posted on 12/01/2009 6:48:05 PM PST by squarebarb
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To: heartwood

I appreciate all of your suggestions, but:

“Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls”

Really? For Christmas? I’m still crying 23 years later! LOL


22 posted on 12/01/2009 6:48:05 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: squarebarb

“Enemy Women”

Sounds interesting. Author?


23 posted on 12/01/2009 6:48:59 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: highimpact

Well, it’s a bit of a read, but Brothers Karamazoff by Dostoyevski. If she’s reading Tolstoy, she’s ready for Dostoyevski.

Anything by Solzhenitsyn.

Anything by Kipling. Especially Jungle Book.

What about Mark Twain? Has she read Tom Sawyer?

I second the once and future king. She will very much love that book!


24 posted on 12/01/2009 6:49:19 PM PST by BenKenobi
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To: BenKenobi

“What about Mark Twain? Has she read Tom Sawyer?”

She read Huckleberry Finn a couple years ago and didn’t like it. Now that she’s older, I’m sure she’ll enjoy Tom Sawyer. Thanks for the suggestion.


25 posted on 12/01/2009 6:51:32 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: BenKenobi

If she likes Arthurian fiction, try Idylls of the King by Tennyson.


26 posted on 12/01/2009 6:52:25 PM PST by BenKenobi
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To: highimpact

Robert Heinlein’s young novels should work for Sci-Fi.
Also Agatha Christie for mystery.
“The Westing Game” by Ellen Raskin
“Understood Betsy” by Dorothy Canfield Fisher
“All Creatures Great and Small” by James Harriot


27 posted on 12/01/2009 6:53:55 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (I miss the competent fiscal policy and flag waving patriotism of the Carter Administration)
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To: highimpact
I would recommend "Lord of the Rings," "The Count of Monte Christo," "Pride and Prejudice," "Last of the Mohicans," "Something of Value."

Yes, "Diary of Ann Frank" and "To Kill a Mockingbird" are good books. But not for Christmas.

28 posted on 12/01/2009 6:55:11 PM PST by Jane Austen (Boycott the Philadelphia Eagles!)
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To: BenKenobi

Hmm, if she hasn’t read much science fiction, she’d probably enjoy Jules Verne’s books.


29 posted on 12/01/2009 6:55:13 PM PST by BenKenobi
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To: BenKenobi

“The Count of Monte Cristo”

This. Seconded. Dumas she would love.


30 posted on 12/01/2009 6:56:28 PM PST by BenKenobi
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To: highimpact

Birthday Snow, by Monique Niemaszyk
Spring’s Gift of Hope, also by Monique Niemaszyk
and two by Carmen Marcoux:
Arms of Love
Surrender


31 posted on 12/01/2009 6:57:09 PM PST by firerosemom ("Don't make Me come down there..." --- God)
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To: highimpact

Ender’s Game. Awesome. Maybe not if she’s really girlie though.


32 posted on 12/01/2009 7:00:40 PM PST by thefactor (yes, as a matter of fact, i DID only read the excerpt)
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To: highimpact

Two SciFi multiple volume epics come to mind both with very strong female leads; Anne McCaffery’s “Dragonriders of Pern” series and Jean Auel’s Earth’s Children / “Clan of the Cave Bear” series. The latter may be a bit to sexually explicit for that age (I don’t have any 12-13 females to ask about it) but its depiction of the Ice Age and primitive Eurasia still resonates with me.


33 posted on 12/01/2009 7:01:01 PM PST by SES1066 (Cycling to conserve, Conservative to save, Saving to Retire, will Retire to Cycle.)
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To: highimpact
Well, for adventure, try Clive Cussler. Just pick one.
34 posted on 12/01/2009 7:01:10 PM PST by 50cal Smokepole (Effective gun control involves effective recoil management)
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To: heartwood

You mentioned Huck Finn but neglected to mention Tom Sawyer. Why?


35 posted on 12/01/2009 7:03:31 PM PST by calex59
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To: JesusBmyGod

Ping to book ideas for our girl.

Many thanks to all FReepers for offering suggestions!


36 posted on 12/01/2009 7:03:39 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: highimpact

I remember still reading Dickens when I was a kid. Oliver Twist — I still remember Chapter 1: I Am Born. Tried to read all the classics & set my own reading lists. But still remember clutching my Oliver Twist on the (city) bus to school at about that age.


37 posted on 12/01/2009 7:04:04 PM PST by Bhoy
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To: highimpact

Anything by Jane Austen. Also, the Anne of Green Gables series. I remember being fascinated by Henry VIII and Elizabeth I at that age. Gone With The Wind and The Secret Garden.


38 posted on 12/01/2009 7:06:06 PM PST by Mangia E Statti Zitto
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To: highimpact

Couple of suggestions:

History (real people):

Real Men: Ten Courageous Americans to Know and Admire - You can get it at Amazon

High Fantasy (probably my all time favorite book (both my grown daughters also from the time they were early teens):

The Deed of Paksenarrion: A Novel - also at Amazon

Hope she likes these.

Have a great Christmas!


39 posted on 12/01/2009 7:06:10 PM PST by Patrsup (To stubborn to change now)
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To: SES1066

“Clan of the Cave Bear”

I’ve read it. Way too explicit for a 12 y/o, but a good role-model book for a teenager nonetheless. I’ll check out “Earth’s Children.” I appreciate the mention.


40 posted on 12/01/2009 7:07:10 PM PST by highimpact (Abortion - [n]: human sacrifice at the altar of convenience.)
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To: highimpact
Especially “The Hound of the Baskervilles.” I had completely forgotten about that book.

Any of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes books would work and for a bit of fun contrasting today's science fiction have her read his "The Lost World".

41 posted on 12/01/2009 7:09:38 PM PST by calex59
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To: highimpact

The Little Britches series (8 books) by Ralph Moody. Autobiography/recollections of growing up in Colorado (& elsewhere) in the early 1900’s. Great, wholesome, honorable tales of survival and family values during rough times. Lots of horse & outdoor stuff. I loved them when I was 10 and read and enjoyed them again in my 50’s.


42 posted on 12/01/2009 7:10:09 PM PST by ironmaidenPR2717 (Death before decaf.)
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To: highimpact

Digging into the memory banks here for what I was reading at that age. I think my favorites way back then were Christy by Catherine Marshall and Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier. Jamaica Inn by Du Maurier was also a favorite.


43 posted on 12/01/2009 7:11:32 PM PST by mollynme (cogito, ergo freepum)
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To: calex59
Because I read Tom Sawyer when I was 8 or 9, and Huck Finn when I was 12 or so.
44 posted on 12/01/2009 7:13:15 PM PST by heartwood
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To: highimpact

One other suggestion if you don’t mind. The Nancey Drew series of books(if you can find them)are a good way for a modern teenager to see what teenagers were like in the late 1930s and early 40s. Not to mention Nancy is a good role model:)


45 posted on 12/01/2009 7:13:20 PM PST by calex59
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To: highimpact

Diary of Anne Frank has nearly nothing to do with concentration camps other than the fear of them. This is a diary written during the time that the family (along with another jewish family) was being hidden in the attic of an office building and the crush she had on the teenage boy of the other family.

My 12 year old loves it and I certainly recommend it. I mostly do so because it makes it real to the kids what it COULD be like. I mean this was a real girl, these were her real words and her real experience.


46 posted on 12/01/2009 7:13:47 PM PST by autumnraine (You can't fix stupid, but you can vote it out!)
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To: heartwood

I see, well I started reading when I was 41/2(really) so don’t have reference as to what age a person should start reading Tom Sawyer, since I read before age 6, but I read it now and then even today, just to refresh my memory of Sam Clemens and his style of writing.


47 posted on 12/01/2009 7:15:22 PM PST by calex59
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To: inpajamas; highimpact

This book looks great! Hope I get it for Christmas.


48 posted on 12/01/2009 7:16:10 PM PST by JesusBmyGod (Baruch ha'ba B'Shem Yahweh)
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To: highimpact

I’ll tell you a good series that I enjoyed and that is the Xanth series by Piers Anthony. They are not deep, they are not nobel worthy literature, but they are very very cute without being childish. It’s a fantasy world with a lot of cute word play the objects as well as the characters.


49 posted on 12/01/2009 7:16:18 PM PST by autumnraine (You can't fix stupid, but you can vote it out!)
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To: highimpact

has she read the little house series? or the harry potter series? both are very good for that age i think.
i discovered mary stewart at about that same age. her arthurian trilogy is wonderful.
the crystal cave
the hollow hills
the last enchantment.


50 posted on 12/01/2009 7:17:01 PM PST by madamemayhem (defeat isn't getting knocked down, it's not getting back up)
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