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Whisky distilled in England for first time in 100 years (and even the Scots are buying it)
Daily Mail ^ | December 10, 2009 | Niall Firth

Posted on 12/10/2009 10:27:52 AM PST by C19fan

Its pale, amber hue evokes a classic Scotch whisky, distilled in the wind-swept Highlands of Northern Scotland. But there's something rather unusual about this single malt: it was produced in England. For the first time in 100 years, a whisky made south of the border is going on sale. Produced at St. George's Distillery by the River Thet, nestled among the farms of Norfolk, the English Whisky Co's single malt has been rated as 'brilliant' by experts.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS: alcohol; england; scotland; whiskey
"If It Ain't Scottish, It's Crap!"
1 posted on 12/10/2009 10:27:54 AM PST by C19fan
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To: C19fan

Well, I’d give it a go...


2 posted on 12/10/2009 10:34:29 AM PST by fhayek
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To: C19fan

I may try it, but they better not call it “Scotch”.


3 posted on 12/10/2009 10:38:47 AM PST by SJSAMPLE
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To: C19fan
'We are shipping about 500 bottles a month to Scotland and we expect that to grow.'
Next thing you know they'll be shipping coal to Newcastle.
4 posted on 12/10/2009 10:38:54 AM PST by dblshot
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To: C19fan

I wonder if the Scots can do as the french did and declare that things like Champagne are produced only in their borders (in the chapagne region) and anything produced elsewhere must be called something else, typically sparkling wine in this case. If so, “scotch whiskey” could only be produced in Scotland.


5 posted on 12/10/2009 10:40:38 AM PST by pepsi_junkie (Who is John Galt?)
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To: C19fan

Suntory’s 18yo Yamazaki Single Malt ain’t scotch, but it definitely ain’t crap.


6 posted on 12/10/2009 10:44:06 AM PST by stuartcr (If we are truly made in the image of God, why do we have faults?)
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To: pepsi_junkie

This has been so for generations. Just like bourbon can only be produced in the U.S., though not necessarily Kentucky (but it helps).


7 posted on 12/10/2009 10:47:31 AM PST by fhayek
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To: pepsi_junkie

Any good Scot will tell ya - there’s no ‘e’ in whisky!


8 posted on 12/10/2009 10:51:12 AM PST by PaForBush
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To: PaForBush

Canada and Scotland, no ‘e’. Ireland and America, ‘e’. So which way does England go?


9 posted on 12/10/2009 10:53:24 AM PST by fhayek
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To: pepsi_junkie
December 20, 2006 The Scotch Whisky Association is battling a Cape Breton distiller of whisky over its use of the word Glen in its trademark. The Association, which represents the owners of well known brands such as Glenfiddich, Glenlivet and Glenmorangie, is concerned that consumers will assume that Glen Breton Rare single malt whisky, produced by Glenora Distillery, is a scotch whisky.

The Association argues that the word “Glen” is too closely linked to scotch whisky for anyone other than Scottish producers to use. “Scotch Whisky” itself is a designation that is protected under the federal Trade-marks Act for use only with whisky produced in Scotland.

The Canadian distillery, which has applied to register the mark GLEN BRETON, argues that Cape Breton, where it is based, has very strong Scottish roots because it was settled by the Scottish over 200 years ago. The region is riddled with towns and villages that contain the word “Glen”, which means a place at the base of highlands or mountains. The Association has opposed the GLEN BRETON trademark application.

Posted 15 Jun 2009

Glenora Distillers International Ltd., won a major victory when the Supreme Court of Canada refused to hear an appeal by the SWA that could have blocked the company’s trademark Glen Breton Rare. For nine years and through four levels of court challenges, the Scotch Whisky Association has fought to protect the Scottishness of he word “Glen”.

“We have no objection to the production of single malt whisky in Canada,” said the SWA’s David Williamson. “What is of concern, though, is any product that tries to take unfair advantage of Scotch whisky’s international reputation by adopting a Scottish-sounding name.”

Unsurprisingly the word “Glen” figures in an area colonised by Scots. Glenora, whose main product Glen Breton Rare single malt takes its name from its hometown of, er, Glenville, a small hamlet just south of um, Inverness – in, er, Nova Scotia.


10 posted on 12/10/2009 11:06:08 AM PST by Snowyman
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To: pepsi_junkie

Never heard of Jack Daniels?


11 posted on 12/10/2009 11:08:34 AM PST by norton (No tagline here, Just move along.)
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To: norton

I don’t think anyone calls Jack Daniels, “scotch”.


12 posted on 12/10/2009 11:12:05 AM PST by fhayek
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To: norton
Jack Daniels is not a Scotch Whiskey, nor is it a Bourbon Whiskey.

Jack Daniels is a Sour Mash Whiskey.

13 posted on 12/10/2009 11:14:25 AM PST by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: norton
Never heard of Jack Daniels?

Jack Daniels is not a bourbon, if that's what you mean. It has a differnt filtering process, though a good sour mash whiskey, it can't be called bourbon. Just like I'd assume this stuff will be classified as a whiskey and not Scotch. I still want to try it though!

14 posted on 12/10/2009 11:14:25 AM PST by lovecraft (Specialization is for insects.)
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To: lovecraft

Jack Daniels, and bourbon are distinctly American whiskies based primarily on corn. Scotch and Irish whiskey is based upon barely. Canadian whisky is based largely on rye (for the most part).


15 posted on 12/10/2009 11:18:04 AM PST by fhayek
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To: Constitution Day

ping


16 posted on 12/10/2009 11:22:06 AM PST by Tijeras_Slim (Live jubtabulously!)
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To: lovecraft
I wasn't aware of the filtering differences being critical (or even 'being') but it's always been my understanding that it is 'Tennessee Sipping Whiskey' out of deference to Kentucky.

And, just like you, I'm trying to find out how to lay hands on a bottle of the English malt.
(Also, as another poster noted, I never had an issue with Suntory's 'not scotch'.)

17 posted on 12/10/2009 11:26:29 AM PST by norton
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To: pepsi_junkie

bourbon, champagne, scotch.. gotta be made in the right place to be called it.


18 posted on 12/10/2009 11:38:35 AM PST by absolootezer0 (2x divorced, tattooed, pierced, harley hatin, meghan mccain luvin', smoker and pit bull owner..what?)
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To: absolootezer0
bourbon, champagne, scotch.. gotta be made in the right place to be called it.

If only I could talk my town into renaming itself "Beer"! Then we could charge a royalty from all the breweries in the world! Bwah hah hah!

19 posted on 12/10/2009 11:47:45 AM PST by pepsi_junkie (Who is John Galt?)
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