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'Fried Egg' may be impact crater
BBC News ^ | Friday, December 18, 2009 | Jonathan Amos

Posted on 12/20/2009 9:37:16 AM PST by SunkenCiv

Portuguese scientists have found a depression on the Atlantic Ocean floor they think may be an impact crater.

The roughly circular, 6km-wide hollow has a broad central dome and has been dubbed the "Fried Egg" because of its distinctive shape.

It was detected to the south of the Azores Islands during a survey to map the continental shelf.

If the Fried Egg was made by a space impactor, the collision probably took place within the past 17 million years...

It lies under 2km of water about 150km from the Azores archipelago.

The depressed ring sits roughly 110m below the surrounding ocean bottom, with the circular dome-shaped central uplift 3km in diameter and with a base-to-top height of some 300m...

A volcanic origin for the Fried Egg seems unlikely because the Portuguese team has not been able to find any lava flows within the structure or on its surroundings.

Interestingly, there is another - but much smaller - feature just 3-4km to the west of the egg.

'Fried Egg' may be impact crater

(Excerpt) Read more at news.bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Astronomy; Science
KEYWORDS: atlantis; azores; catastrophism; crater; friedegg; godsgravesglyphs; impactcrater; meteor; plato; portugal

1 posted on 12/20/2009 9:37:17 AM PST by SunkenCiv
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2 posted on 12/20/2009 9:37:50 AM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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3 posted on 12/20/2009 9:38:23 AM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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To: SunkenCiv

More interesting to me is the fact that scientists say that if the Earth were struck by an object that large, it would wipe out all higher life forms. So how did the higher life forms we have survive that?


4 posted on 12/20/2009 9:43:45 AM PST by Brilliant
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To: SunkenCiv

Looks like the fried egg was a straight in impact, if that ‘s what it is.

The smaller egg appears to have been impacted from the right in that picture.


5 posted on 12/20/2009 9:44:00 AM PST by Ole Okie
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To: Brilliant

Atlantis. No Doubt.


6 posted on 12/20/2009 9:45:29 AM PST by screaminsunshine (!!)
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To: Ole Okie

A lot of big impacts are “doublet”, caused by multiple pieces of a former whole, like the SL-9 comet impacts on Jupiter.


7 posted on 12/20/2009 9:48:20 AM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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To: Brilliant

The sea.

The Eltanin impact about 2 million years ago hit in the Southern Pacific (I think it was the Pacific) near Antarctica. The submerged crater was found during the multi-year International Geophysical Year in the 1950s, and named after the boat that carried the researchers. Subsequently the iridium signature of the impact has been identified.


8 posted on 12/20/2009 9:50:23 AM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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To: Brilliant

Mass populations can’t. But you can find various places on the earth where a society could survive through a bad period, and just continue on.

If you had to pick a realistic threat to society...the impact threat is 99 times more realistic than climate change...yet for every dollar spent on climate change...one cent gets spent on impact and meteor studies.


9 posted on 12/20/2009 9:51:36 AM PST by pepsionice
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To: screaminsunshine

It’s in the right place... :’) Shades of Otto Muck!


10 posted on 12/20/2009 9:52:03 AM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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To: Brilliant
Overstated, but supported. From http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=what-ever-happened-to-the "The fossils show a statistical variation in extinction rates having a period of approximately 26 million years. The two periodic peaks of extinction after the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, 65 million years ago, are at the end of the Eocene (roughly 37 million years ago) and in the Middle Miocene (about 17 million years ago).
11 posted on 12/20/2009 9:53:41 AM PST by stormer
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To: SunkenCiv
Or more. Here are examples from the moon and Mars...


12 posted on 12/20/2009 9:57:43 AM PST by stormer
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To: pepsionice
"If you had to pick a realistic threat to society...the impact threat is 99 times more realistic than climate change...yet for every dollar spent on climate change...one cent gets spent on impact and meteor studies."

That's right. It is a mathematical certainty that Earth will again be hit by an asteroid/comet of such size that it will cause near-global level extinction. It's anything but a mathematical certainty that the earth is warming in any significant way do to man.

13 posted on 12/20/2009 10:02:43 AM PST by OldDeckHand
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To: stormer

Interesting... Most of those impacts seem to be missing the central uplift of the “fried egg” (or else it is obscured by dust and debris) - perhaps due to differing substrate materials at the point of impact...


14 posted on 12/20/2009 10:06:26 AM PST by Zeppo ("Happy Pony is on - and I'm NOT missing Happy Pony")
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To: Brilliant
So how did the higher life forms we have survive that?

Who says they did? Think of it as a celestial reset button.

15 posted on 12/20/2009 10:06:53 AM PST by El Gato ("The Second Amendment is the RESET button of the United States Constitution." -- Doug McKay)
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To: pepsionice

“one cent gets spent on impact and meteor studies.”

That much? I would have thought it was much smaller - like .001 cent, concidering the multi-billions spent worldwide on the Great Hoax.


16 posted on 12/20/2009 10:20:58 AM PST by PIF
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To: El Gato

“So how did the higher life forms we have survive that?

Who says they did? Think of it as a celestial reset button.”

They left before the impact and haven’t been back since -— Earth is still waiting for a higher life form to evolve/be created.


17 posted on 12/20/2009 10:22:55 AM PST by PIF
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To: SunkenCiv

And the cities are round! Just like the theory says - here are still elephants etc under the domes.


18 posted on 12/20/2009 10:24:09 AM PST by PIF
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To: Zeppo
Interesting observation. Here's an example from Ganymede - the central mounts seem to be evident. I could only speculate as to any of a number of variables. Substrate, energy at impact, and gravity would seem to be the main culprits.


19 posted on 12/20/2009 10:29:28 AM PST by stormer
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To: SunkenCiv

I like mine over easy. Very cool..

the amount of energy involved. wow.

and it could happen again. 8-}


20 posted on 12/20/2009 10:31:40 AM PST by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi ... Godspeed .. Monthly Donor Onboard .. May yur bandwidth exceed your girth)
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To: Zeppo

I also wonder if there is any vertical exaggeration in the original image that would make the central mounts appear more profound (not uncommon to demonstrate morphology).


21 posted on 12/20/2009 10:32:56 AM PST by stormer
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To: SunkenCiv

A ‘’fried egg’’ crater? Sounds more like a’’ scrambled’’one:-)


22 posted on 12/20/2009 11:31:42 AM PST by John-Irish ("Shame of him who thinks of it''.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Interestingly, there is another - but much smaller - feature just 3-4km to the west of the egg.

It would seem that the big crater happened sometime after the smaller feature.

23 posted on 12/20/2009 11:57:24 AM PST by Mike Darancette (Copenhagen Climate Summit; Shovel Ready)
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To: Zeppo

The real key to why the fried egg effect, is whether the area was covered in water, as it is now.


24 posted on 12/20/2009 12:24:22 PM PST by UCANSEE2 (<I>)
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To: Brilliant
More interesting to me is the fact that scientists say that if the Earth were struck by an object that large, it would wipe out all higher life forms. So how did the higher life forms we have survive that?

Maybe we were not the higher life form?

25 posted on 12/20/2009 12:26:20 PM PST by UCANSEE2 (<I>)
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To: stormer
Oh, everyone knows what caused those...
26 posted on 12/20/2009 12:29:24 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

A little red ‘X’?


27 posted on 12/20/2009 12:35:20 PM PST by stormer
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To: stormer

Hmmm...

Apparently so.


28 posted on 12/20/2009 12:46:21 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: Zeppo
Most of those impacts seem to be missing the central uplift...perhaps due to differing substrate materials at the point of impact...

The Moon has a very small iron core(in proportion to Earth). Mars also has a small core and it seems to be solid rather then molten. I expect that might explain the difference in appearance as an impact on Earth's crust would look more like a stone dropped into water (and frozen immediately) as opposed to a bullet fired into a rock surface.

Regards,
GtG

29 posted on 12/20/2009 1:17:07 PM PST by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Haven’t they been hunting an impact crater in the Azores for a long time?


30 posted on 12/20/2009 1:34:42 PM PST by razorback-bert (We used to call them astronomical numbers. Now we should call them economical numbers.)
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To: stormer

Thanks for posting the photos. They show very clearly what happened. Fascinating.


31 posted on 12/20/2009 1:36:41 PM PST by zot
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To: razorback-bert
Not sure if they've been looking for an impact crater, but the Portuguese government is looking into ways to redefine its continental shelf in order to expand its territory. It was this exploration that led to this discovery.
32 posted on 12/20/2009 6:54:32 PM PST by stormer
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To: Brilliant
More interesting to me is the fact that scientists say that if the Earth were struck by an object that large, it would wipe out all higher life forms. So how did the higher life forms we have survive that?

six kilometers is not that big... not any where as big as the 241 KM diameter of the crater left from the event that is thought to have ended the reign of the dinosaurs...

33 posted on 12/21/2009 2:09:58 PM PST by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE isAAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: stormer

Multiple lightning strikes...

34 posted on 12/21/2009 2:11:24 PM PST by Swordmaker (Remember, the proper pronunciation of IE isAAAAIIIIIEEEEEEE!)
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To: SunkenCiv
If the Fried Egg was made by a space impactor, the collision probably took place within the past 17 million years...

I vaguely remember seeing the flash across the sky but I might be mistaken too.........I think I was caught up in trying to light a fire with some sticks.

35 posted on 12/21/2009 2:13:46 PM PST by Hot Tabasco (I want a hoochie-mama for Christmas, only a hoochie-mama will do............)
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To: Hot Tabasco

hope you remembered sun block.


36 posted on 12/21/2009 8:18:49 PM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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To: razorback-bert

Could be.


37 posted on 12/21/2009 8:19:41 PM PST by SunkenCiv (My Sunday Feeling is that Nothing is easy. Goes for the rest of the week too.)
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