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Question about Texas
TV program prop anomaly | 12/26/09 | DGHoodini

Posted on 12/26/2009 6:33:27 PM PST by DGHoodini

Just a quick question, that I am pretty sure I already know the answer to, but have a nagging doubt about:

Was cotton ever a cash crop in Texas?

I keep thinking 'No', but as I said, I'm getting a little voice in my head saying:"it might'a been...".

Anyone know the answer?


TOPICS: Agriculture; Business/Economy; Chit/Chat; History
KEYWORDS: cotton; crops; dumbquestion; history; texas
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1 posted on 12/26/2009 6:33:28 PM PST by DGHoodini
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To: DGHoodini

I am not certain but I would bet that Texas is the largest cotton grower in the nation.


2 posted on 12/26/2009 6:34:44 PM PST by yarddog
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To: yarddog

I have several “Texas Cotton” western shirts. I love them.


3 posted on 12/26/2009 6:35:42 PM PST by Old Texan ((Leave me the HECK alone and let me live my life. I hate Commie's))
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To: DGHoodini

yep!


4 posted on 12/26/2009 6:37:10 PM PST by deadsteve
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To: Old Texan

I also just remembered that the “Cotton Bowl” is played in Texas.


5 posted on 12/26/2009 6:37:22 PM PST by yarddog
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To: yarddog

OK, a follow up question: Was it historically so? One of the biggest producers? As in, before the Civil War?


6 posted on 12/26/2009 6:37:45 PM PST by DGHoodini (Iran Azadi!)
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To: DGHoodini
Cotton was King before cattle and that was followed by oil. Cotton is still grown all over the state.
7 posted on 12/26/2009 6:38:36 PM PST by TWfromTEXAS (Life is the one choice that pro choicers will not support.)
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To: DGHoodini
Very much so. I lived next door to a cotten gin for many years. Great rat hunting with .22 shorts.

/johnny

8 posted on 12/26/2009 6:38:41 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: yarddog

That’s my initial impression, also. Something like 30-40% of our cotton acreage might be in Texas.


9 posted on 12/26/2009 6:39:05 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: DGHoodini

Heck yes. I live in an old cotton capitol


10 posted on 12/26/2009 6:41:17 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of the Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: DGHoodini

http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/AA/npa1.html


11 posted on 12/26/2009 6:41:20 PM PST by Quiller (When you're fighting to survive, there is no "try" -- there is only do, or do not.)
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To: DGHoodini

I’m pretty sure that your question is Civil War related, and the answer is yes, Texas was a cotton state.

Even today, cotton is only second to beef in ag dollars.


12 posted on 12/26/2009 6:41:50 PM PST by Melas
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To: DGHoodini

From a tamu website:

“Texas leads the U.S. in cotton production and it is our leading cash crop, ranking only behind the beef and nursery industries in total cash receipts. In 2000, growers produced over 4 million bales, representing over $1 billion to the Texas cotton industry. Texas annually produces about 25% of the entire U.S. crop and plants over 6 million acres! That’s over 9,000 square miles of cotton fields.”


13 posted on 12/26/2009 6:41:59 PM PST by TWfromTEXAS (Life is the one choice that pro choicers will not support.)
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To: DGHoodini

Cotton was and still is big business in Texas. Just do a google search on Texas Cotton, and you get 18,400,000 pages.


14 posted on 12/26/2009 6:42:30 PM PST by B.O. Plenty (Give war a chance...)
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To: DGHoodini

My family raised cotton, and it’s still a cash crop in central Texas. When my mom and dad moved into town, my mom became a beautician. My dad was always talking about moving back to the country. My mom told him, “I’ve picked every cotton boll I ever want to pick!” She also told him she had no intention of sitting on the back porch and watching the dogs f***, cause that’s all there is to do in the country, but that doesn’t have anything to do with your original post.


15 posted on 12/26/2009 6:43:11 PM PST by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: DGHoodini

Thanks al for the replies...Somehow I got it in my head that cotton, pre-Civil War, was mostly a South Eastern and South Central U.S. crop.


16 posted on 12/26/2009 6:43:23 PM PST by DGHoodini (Iran Azadi!)
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To: DGHoodini

My father wrecked the old cotton warehouses in Galveston, that is where he salvaged what I think were Galveston’s oldest fire hydrants dated from 1860.


17 posted on 12/26/2009 6:43:39 PM PST by ansel12 (Traitor Earl Warren's court 1953-1969, libertarian hero, anti social conservative loser.)
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To: DGHoodini
Texas A&M University's thoughts on Texas cotton production:

Texas leads the U.S. in cotton production and it is our leading cash crop, ranking only behind the beef and nursery industries in total cash receipts. In 2000, growers produced over 4 million bales, representing over $1 billion to the Texas cotton industry. Texas annually produces about 25% of the entire U.S. crop and plants over 6 million acres! That’s over 9,000 square miles of cotton fields.

18 posted on 12/26/2009 6:43:52 PM PST by centurion316
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To: DGHoodini

My daddy was a cotton picker when he was a kid, the whole family did it. Yes, they were poor.


19 posted on 12/26/2009 6:44:37 PM PST by GeronL (This is a tagline)
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To: DGHoodini

Yes, immediately after Moses Austin recieved his land grants, cotton accounted for 70.6% of Texas exports.


20 posted on 12/26/2009 6:44:41 PM PST by Melas
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To: DGHoodini; humblegunner
Not sure about cotton but lemons are plentiful.

Image courtesy of humblegraphics

21 posted on 12/26/2009 6:44:54 PM PST by jla ("Free Republic is Palin Country" - JimRob)
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To: JRandomFreeper

you seem to know ...I would think that under irrigation its two crops a year...almost three?


22 posted on 12/26/2009 6:45:10 PM PST by himno hero
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To: ansel12

The fire hydrants may have been from 1865.


23 posted on 12/26/2009 6:45:44 PM PST by ansel12 (Traitor Earl Warren's court 1953-1969, libertarian hero, anti social conservative loser.)
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To: DGHoodini
A great place to meet and eat...


24 posted on 12/26/2009 6:46:39 PM PST by mylife (The Roar Of the Masses Could Be Farts)
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To: DGHoodini

The whole panhandle of Texas is cotton and oil, and more recently, vineyards!


25 posted on 12/26/2009 6:47:16 PM PST by wysiwyg (What parts of "right of the people" and "shall not be infringed" do you not understand?)
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To: DGHoodini

First hit on google. “texas cotton production”

http://cotton.tamu.edu/cottoncountry.htm

“Texas leads the U.S. in cotton production and it is our leading cash crop, ranking only behind the beef and nursery industries in total cash receipts. In 2000, growers produced over 4 million bales, representing over $1 billion to the Texas cotton industry. Texas annually produces about 25% of the entire U.S. crop and plants over 6 million acres! That’s over 9,000 square miles of cotton fields.”


26 posted on 12/26/2009 6:47:22 PM PST by dangerdoc
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To: DGHoodini

was and still is.


27 posted on 12/26/2009 6:47:48 PM PST by texmexis best
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To: DGHoodini

That was true, ante-bellum when cotton had to move to market via the southern river systems and required slave labor. However, post Civil War, Texas discovered this little thing called the Ogalalla Acquifer out in West Texas. They growed alot of cotton with that water


28 posted on 12/26/2009 6:47:56 PM PST by centurion316
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To: DGHoodini

You can google it for more detailed info, but the short answer is “Yes, before during and even after the Civil War, cotton was a cash crop for Texas.” A very important one, too, for the Confederacy.


29 posted on 12/26/2009 6:48:21 PM PST by piytar (Ammo is hard to find! Bought some lately? Please share where at www.ammo-finder.com)
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To: DGHoodini

Still is.


30 posted on 12/26/2009 6:49:27 PM PST by Professional Engineer (Will Algore give me carbon credits for using treehuggers as home heating fuel? ~~ Galt/Reardon 2012)
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To: JRandomFreeper
Very much so. I lived next door to a cotten gin for many years. Great rat hunting with .22 shorts.

When I was in college (Colorado) we used to go to the local dump (long before land fills) and shoot rats with .22 longs and shorts. Hard to do. Then we tried .38 and .45 hand guns. A bit better. Finally the 12 gauge really did the trick.

31 posted on 12/26/2009 6:49:39 PM PST by ProudFossil
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To: DGHoodini

I am sure Florida is not a top cotton producer but when I was a kid, I picked cotton for 3 cents a pound. I used to work with a younger guy who grew up in Texas and he picked cotton as a kid too.

The main difference is he said they picked the boll and all.

We had to pick the cotton out of the boll and those bolls would prick your fingers or at least irritate them after they had opened and dried.

BTW, there is a large cotton field not far from where I am at right now in NW Florida.


32 posted on 12/26/2009 6:51:21 PM PST by yarddog
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To: ansel12

Those cotton warehouses where there for a longtime. Some still standing five years ago when I last past through. Did he knock the last standing down.


33 posted on 12/26/2009 6:52:54 PM PST by Orange1998
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To: GeronL

Yeah, my mom talked about absolutely hating picking cotton.


34 posted on 12/26/2009 6:55:15 PM PST by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: DGHoodini

Heck yes. My neighborhood has several hundred acres of cotton growing about 150 yards from my front door.

Cotton’s been big here for a long time...


35 posted on 12/26/2009 7:01:02 PM PST by ataDude (Its like 1933, mixed with the Carter 70s, plus the books 1984 and Animal Farm, all at the same time.)
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To: ProudFossil

Back in the 50s my buddy and I were shooting rats at the dump and we both came close to dying that night. He because a rat ran up his pant leg and me because I was ROTGLMAO!!!


36 posted on 12/26/2009 7:01:18 PM PST by tubebender (Some minds are like concrete Thoroughly mixed up and permanently set...)
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To: yarddog
We had to pick the cotton out of the boll and those bolls would prick your fingers or at least irritate them after they had opened and dried.

Yeah, those bolls get hard as a pecan shell and stick right in the cuticle or under the finger nail when you try to pluck the cotton out. Fortunately, hardly anyone picks cotton by hand anymore.

37 posted on 12/26/2009 7:01:35 PM PST by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: DGHoodini

Yes, “King Cotton” reigned here! Many of the little towns across Texas were connected by the trains that carried the cotton to bigger cities—when other means of transportation came along (air)
many of those little towns just dried up and withered away.

I have friends in east Texas who remember working in the fields harvest cotton and how hard it was in the hot weather.

http://www.texasescapes.com/Cotton/Cotton.htm
http://dkc.esc20.net/pdfs/Texas_Heritage/Secondary_Instructional_Recipe3_Boom_and_Bust_Farming7.pdf


38 posted on 12/26/2009 7:02:02 PM PST by pillut48 ("Stand now. Stand together. Stand for what is right."-Gov.Sarah Palin, "Going Rogue")
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To: DGHoodini

I grew up in West Texas and there are cotton fields everywhere. It is definitely a cash crop.


39 posted on 12/26/2009 7:06:17 PM PST by my small voice (A biased media and an uneducated public is the biggest threat to our democracy)
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To: DGHoodini


Was cotton ever a cash crop in Texas?

In case it hasn’t been mentioned on the thread, I do recall there was
a common expression for parts of Texas:

“The darkest soil, the whitest cotton!”

It was/is a major crop and research subject at Texas A&M.


40 posted on 12/26/2009 7:07:34 PM PST by VOA
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To: Richard Kimball

This thread brings back a lot of memories. Back in the 50’s my Daddy had quit farming and was working at Eglin AFB, but our Uncle Buck grew a lot of cotton and I was glad of the chance to make money.

It really was hard work tho. I remember the first trip to the cotton gin in Geneva, Alabama which is just across the state line. Uncle Buck paid us in cash and the first thing I bought with my money was a monopoly set.


41 posted on 12/26/2009 7:09:03 PM PST by yarddog
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To: DGHoodini

Yes.........Carson County Cotton Gin has truck bales laying all over the place right now up in the Panhandle and South of Lubbock cotton as far as ya can see !

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-123764993.html

Been up and running in Carson County Cotton Gin for last two or three years or more I believe.


42 posted on 12/26/2009 7:09:48 PM PST by Squantos (Be polite. Be professional. But have a plan to kill everyone you meet)
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To: DGHoodini

What did the Silk Worm ever do for Texas?


43 posted on 12/26/2009 7:12:13 PM PST by JohnD9207 (REGISTERED RIGHT WING THUG!)
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To: DGHoodini

Yes, indeed, it was.

Cotton root rot is a problem and is one reason that much land has been taken out of cotton production, particularly in the blacklands of North Texas.


44 posted on 12/26/2009 7:13:09 PM PST by Jedidah
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To: DGHoodini

In addition to The Lone Star State, California is also a major cotton producing state. I remember driving through the Central Valley in early November, 1991, and seeing these giant rectangular “piles” of cotton here and there. Each pile was the size of a semi-trailer and had a tarp tied to the top of the pile. A number was spray painted on the side of each rectangular “pile” of cotton.

Unfortunately, about two weeks later a dust storm blew through this same area. There was a massive pile-up of cars and trucks on Interstate 5, and around 19 people lost their lives.


45 posted on 12/26/2009 7:17:04 PM PST by july4thfreedomfoundation (A Jimmy Carter got us a Ronald Reagan.....a Barack Obama will get us a Sarah Palin)
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To: DGHoodini
When Major General Gordon Granger landed in Galveston, Texas to take over reconstruction his first order was that all cotton was to be turned over to US troops.
46 posted on 12/26/2009 7:18:25 PM PST by Deaf Smith
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To: DGHoodini

Probably because the Ewings only dealt in oil and misbehavior.


47 posted on 12/26/2009 7:33:36 PM PST by mamelukesabre
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To: july4thfreedomfoundation
giant rectangular “piles” of cotton here and there. Each pile was the size of a semi-trailer and had a tarp tied to the top of the pile

Those are called "modules". You see them everywhere in Texas/

48 posted on 12/26/2009 7:33:58 PM PST by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: GeronL

“My daddy was a cotton picker when he was a kid, the whole family did it. Yes, they were poor.”

So was mine...he grew up on a share-cropping farm, picked cotton from sun up to sun down for 50 cents a day. Said it made every job he had after that seem easy by comparison.


49 posted on 12/26/2009 7:36:15 PM PST by Magic Fingers
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To: mylife

The breakfast at Cotton Gin are awesome!!!


50 posted on 12/26/2009 7:41:50 PM PST by TheMom (I'm now a grandma! Welcome to the world Kaiden Thomas.)
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