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Spray-on liquid glass is about to revolutionize almost everything
PhysOrg ^ | 2/2/10 | Lin Edwards

Posted on 02/02/2010 7:40:24 PM PST by LibWhacker

(PhysOrg.com) -- Spray-on liquid glass is transparent, non-toxic, and can protect virtually any surface against almost any damage from hazards such as water, UV radiation, dirt, heat, and bacterial infections. The coating is also flexible and breathable, which makes it suitable for use on an enormous array of products.

The liquid glass spray (technically termed “SiO2 ultra-thin layering”) consists of almost pure silicon dioxide (silica, the normal compound in glass) extracted from quartz sand. Water or ethanol is added, depending on the type of surface to be coated. There are no additives, and the nano-scale glass coating bonds to the surface because of the quantum forces involved. According to the manufacturers, liquid glass has a long-lasting antibacterial effect because microbes landing on the surface cannot divide or replicate easily.

Liquid glass was invented in Turkey and the patent is held by Nanopool, a family-owned German company. Research on the product was carried out at the Saarbrücken Institute for New Materials. Nanopool is already in negotiations in the UK with a number of companies and with the National Health Service, with a view to its widespread adoption.

The liquid glass spray produces a water-resistant coating only around 100 nanometers (15-30 molecules) thick. On this nanoscale the glass is highly flexible and breathable. The coating is environmentally harmless and non-toxic, and easy to clean using only water or a simple wipe with a damp cloth. It repels bacteria, water and dirt, and resists heat, UV light and even acids. UK project manager with Nanopool, Neil McClelland, said soon almost every product you purchase will be coated with liquid glass.

Food processing companies in Germany have already carried out trials of the spray, and found sterile surfaces that usually needed to be cleaned with strong bleach to keep them sterile needed only a hot water rinse if they were coated with liquid glass. The levels of sterility were higher for the glass-coated surfaces, and the surfaces remained sterile for months.

Other organizations, such as a train company and a hotel chain in the UK, and a hamburger chain in Germany, are also testing liquid glass for a wide range of uses. A year-long trial of the spray in a Lancashire hospital also produced “very promising” results for a range of applications including coatings for equipment, medical implants, catheters, sutures and bandages. The war graves association in the UK is investigating using the spray to treat stone monuments and grave stones, since trials have shown the coating protects against weathering and graffiti. Trials in Turkey are testing the product on monuments such as the Ataturk Mausoleum in Ankara.

The liquid glass coating is breathable, which means it can be used on plants and seeds. Trials in vineyards have found spraying vines increases their resistance to fungal diseases, while other tests have shown sprayed seeds germinate and grow faster than untreated seeds, and coated wood is not attacked by termites. Other vineyard applications include coating corks with liquid glass to prevent “corking” and contamination of wine. The spray cannot be seen by the naked eye, which means it could also be used to treat clothing and other materials to make them stain-resistant. McClelland said you can “pour a bottle of wine over an expensive silk shirt and it will come right off”.

In the home, spray-on glass would eliminate the need for scrubbing and make most cleaning products obsolete. Since it is available in both water-based and alcohol-based solutions, it can be used in the oven, in bathrooms, tiles, sinks, and almost every other surface in the home, and one spray is said to last a year.

Liquid glass spray is perhaps the most important nanotechnology product to emerge to date. It will be available in DIY stores in Britain soon, with prices starting at around £5 ($8 US). Other outlets, such as many supermarkets, may be unwilling to stock the products because they make enormous profits from cleaning products that need to be replaced regularly, and liquid glass would make virtually all of them obsolete.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Science
KEYWORDS: glass; invention; liquid; nanotechnology; spray
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To: dalereed
Take a 60 year old piece of plate glass and measure it top and bottom and you will find that it has settled over the years with the bottom being thicker.

Nope. That's the urban legend. Check out that link.

In other words, while some antique windowpanes are thicker at the bottom, there are no statistical studies to show that all or most antique windowpanes are thicker at the bottom than at the top. The variations in thickness of antique windowpanes has nothing to do with whether glass is a solid or a liquid; its cause lies in the glass manufacturing process employed at the time, which made the production of glass panes of constant thickness quite difficult.

51 posted on 02/02/2010 8:59:26 PM PST by krb (Obama is a miserable failure.)
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To: The Cajun
With all the claims about this stuff, the pointer on my BS meter is starting to jump around rather wildly.

Wouldn't it be interesting if this, and many other claims, turn out to be true. If a whole new world of items was coming out of the nanotechnology industry? Maybe even more than just that industry. Maybe in the energy field.

And the world leaders are trying to rake in as much dough as they can before it all hits?

52 posted on 02/02/2010 9:02:56 PM PST by UCANSEE2
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To: LibWhacker

Perhaps this is a byproduct of cold fusion? Same level of hype. Maybe there’ll be something to it, but ingesting it concerns me.


53 posted on 02/02/2010 9:03:09 PM PST by MCH
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To: LibWhacker

Maybe the next Bond mobile will go green and spray liquid glass instead of oil.
Slippery when dry.


54 posted on 02/02/2010 9:04:12 PM PST by Waverunner ( "Think for yourselves and let others enjoy the privilege to do so too." Voltaire)
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To: dalereed; libh8er

“Glass itself is a liquid”

So is a popsicle.


55 posted on 02/02/2010 9:04:57 PM PST by UCANSEE2
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To: LibWhacker

Hah! I know what you’re thinking, but Mom sez yer still gonna haveta take a bath. Nice try. BTT.


56 posted on 02/02/2010 9:05:14 PM PST by Billthedrill
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To: Tucson Jim
Glass is a liquid.

Yes, it is. But, at room temperature, it's damn near frozen solid.

57 posted on 02/02/2010 9:10:52 PM PST by UCANSEE2
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To: stormer

Please explain?


58 posted on 02/02/2010 9:12:29 PM PST by thecodont
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To: LibWhacker

This world will have a serious GOI problem if this product actually hits the market.

/semiconductor humor

(who gets this joke?)


59 posted on 02/02/2010 9:13:41 PM PST by AlmaKing
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To: UCANSEE2

That’s the problem I have with the ASTM test. Apparently, they define a liquid as having flow at 100F. Water would pass as a liquid at 100F, but fail as a liquid if the test were run above 130F or below 32F. The temp chosen for determination of a liquid seems arbitrary.


60 posted on 02/02/2010 9:16:34 PM PST by AlmaKing
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To: LibWhacker

APPLY DIRECTLY TO FOREHEAD


61 posted on 02/02/2010 9:19:18 PM PST by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: krb

I’ve done it several times to prove it to people.


62 posted on 02/02/2010 9:25:00 PM PST by dalereed
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To: Safetgiver
Notice how the glass appears wavy, distorted?

Old buildings (ones erected before the invention of flat glass) have windows made from spun glass - made by spinning a disc of molten glass and cutting bits from the cooled disc. Window glass from such a source could very well appear distorted, especially if you used an edge piece.

63 posted on 02/02/2010 9:31:14 PM PST by agere_contra
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To: Safetgiver

“Ever see windows in an old building? Notice how the glass appears wavy, distorted? That’s because glass, a liquid, has been running and settling over the years in the window frame.”

No, this is because the modern “tin float” method of making sheet glass is so superior to the older ways of doing it.

However, glass DOES very, very slightly flow over many decades. Telescope lenses and mirrors lose their figure over these time periods. It isn’t much, but telescope mirrors and lenses are figured to incredible accuracy in order to provide maximum focal sharpness, and even small errors become obvious.


64 posted on 02/02/2010 9:32:19 PM PST by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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To: dalereed

You’ve made glass, measured it, aged it 60 years, then measured it again?


65 posted on 02/02/2010 9:37:16 PM PST by krb (Obama is a miserable failure.)
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To: krb

All plate is the same thickness when it’s made.

When doing remodel jobs i’ve taken out old plate and in every case the bottom is larger than the top by a few thousands.

I’m not talking rolled or tempered glass.

Rolled isn’t the same thickness when made and tempered isn’t old enough to find out if it settles.


66 posted on 02/02/2010 9:41:18 PM PST by dalereed
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To: Interesting Times

Thanks for the ping. Liquid glass spray is interesting, but I certainly wouldn’t inhale it.


67 posted on 02/02/2010 9:45:50 PM PST by zot
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To: ReneeLynn

Interesting thought. If it could make hair imprevious to moisture, that would be the end of the dreaded frizzies. And hair washing would basically be reduced to scalp-washing, since everything would easily rinse off the coated hair.


68 posted on 02/02/2010 9:48:56 PM PST by GovernmentShrinker
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To: Safetgiver
Ever see windows in an old building? Notice how the glass appears wavy, distorted? That’s because glass, a liquid, has been running and settling over the years in the window frame.

Or they made crappy glass way back when. Did you see the pane when it was originally installed?

69 posted on 02/02/2010 10:05:24 PM PST by hattend (Mary Jo, this one's for you! (Thank you, Massachusetts - welcome back to the union))
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To: F15Eagle

People in liquid spray on glass houses shouldn’t throw stones.


70 posted on 02/02/2010 10:14:20 PM PST by chemicalman
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To: LibWhacker
Sounds like something Irwin Mainway would sell:

Consumer Reporter: Alright. Fine. Fine. Well, we'd like to show you another one of Mr. Mainway's products. It retails for $1.98, and it's called Bag O' Glass. [ holds up bag of glass ] Mr. Mainway, this is simply a bag of jagged, dangerous, glass bits.

Irwin Mainway: Yeah, right, it's you know, it's glass, it's broken glass, you know? It sells very well, as a matter of fact, you know? It's just broken glass, you know?

Consumer Reporter: [ laughs ] I don't understand. I mean, children could seriously cut themselves on any one of these pieces!

Irwin Mainway: Yeah, well, look - you know, the average kid, he picks up, you know, broken glass anywhere, you know? The beach, the street, garbage cans, parking lots, all over the place in any big city. We're just packaging what the kids want! I mean, it's a creative toy, you know? If you hold this up, you know, you see colors, every color of the rainbow! I mean, it teaches him about light refraction, you know? Prisms, and that stuff! You know what I mean?

71 posted on 02/02/2010 10:22:00 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: GovernmentShrinker

Yep. But I wonder how brushing would go? It’d be great for holding a style.


72 posted on 02/02/2010 10:43:47 PM PST by ReneeLynn (Socialism is SO yesterday. Fascism, it*s the new black. Mmm Mmm Mmm.)
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To: LibWhacker

bflr


73 posted on 02/02/2010 10:44:26 PM PST by Kevmo (So America gets what America deserves - the destruction of its Constitution. ~Leo Donofrio, 6/1/09)
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To: AlmaKing
The temp chosen for determination of a liquid seems arbitrary.

Temperature measurement in Fahrenheit is an arbitrary system to begin with.

0 degrees and 100 degrees don't even represent a phase change point in anything in particular.

74 posted on 02/02/2010 11:03:37 PM PST by UCANSEE2
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To: zot
Liquid glass spray is interesting, but I certainly wouldn’t inhale it.

It's a waste that way. It gets you higher if you intravenously inject it.

75 posted on 02/02/2010 11:06:47 PM PST by UCANSEE2
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To: ReneeLynn

If it’s flexible — which I gather it is, since they’re saying it can be used on growing plants and “expensive silk shirts” — I imagine brushing would either go very smoothly or be rendered completely unnecessary.


76 posted on 02/02/2010 11:10:46 PM PST by GovernmentShrinker
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To: Alamo-Girl

I think they should add it to mascara.


77 posted on 02/02/2010 11:20:46 PM PST by txhurl (off)
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To: thecodont
There is a movie called "The Man in the White Suit". It's about a chemist who develops an indestructible fabric - it can't be torn, it never wears out, and it sheds soil. It's a dream come true and everyone thinks they'll get rich, until they realize they no longer need to make clothes - the textile mills close, the garment manufacturers fire all the workers, and stores go out of business. For once labor and management agree - get the man who invented the miracle fabric. A tale of unintended consequences.


78 posted on 02/02/2010 11:21:37 PM PST by stormer
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To: RandallFlagg
Something ELSE for the muslims to hate us for.

The article said a Turkish company produced it.

79 posted on 02/02/2010 11:30:05 PM PST by toast
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To: stormer

Ah, thanks!


80 posted on 02/02/2010 11:30:15 PM PST by thecodont
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To: doug from upland

I seem to remember you work (worked?) for a glass company...?


81 posted on 02/02/2010 11:32:12 PM PST by nutmeg (Rush Limbaugh & Sarah Palin agree: NO third parties! Take back the GOP)
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To: 21twelve

A whole building that can change colors and stuff. That would be cool.


82 posted on 02/02/2010 11:36:11 PM PST by GeronL (http://tyrannysentinel.blogspot.com)
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To: hinckley buzzard
I've used liquid glass for over 30 years...
83 posted on 02/03/2010 1:00:36 AM PST by Neidermeyer
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To: LibWhacker; Quix

Interesting, thanks.


84 posted on 02/03/2010 1:26:30 AM PST by Joya (Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior, have mercy on me, a sinner!)
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To: puppypusher
"I wonder if this liquid glass will fill in gouges in windshield caused by sand and gravel."

That would probably screw up the optical purity of the glass because it would be thicker in some places (where the pits are) then others.

Perhaps if it were applied on a new windshield it could help prevent pitting.

85 posted on 02/03/2010 3:08:01 AM PST by 101voodoo
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To: Neidermeyer

I’ve been using Zaino products the past couple of years - simply amazing stuff!


86 posted on 02/03/2010 3:12:11 AM PST by newfreep (Palin/DeMint 2012 - Bolton: Secy of State)
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To: Grizzled Bear

His booze, not mine.


87 posted on 02/03/2010 5:24:09 AM PST by conservativeharleyguy (Democrats: Over 60 million fooled daily!)
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To: Quix
Keeps cars looking new!


Frowning takes 68 muscles.
Smiling takes 6.
Pulling this trigger takes 2.
I'm lazy.

88 posted on 02/03/2010 5:47:20 AM PST by The Comedian (Evil can only succeed if good men don't point at it and laugh.)
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To: LibWhacker
Nancy Pelosi's face has been a beta-test site for awhile now.


89 posted on 02/03/2010 5:50:42 AM PST by paulycy (Demand Constitutionality.)
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To: The Comedian; Joya

Hmmmm thanks.


90 posted on 02/03/2010 7:46:52 AM PST by Quix (POL Ldrs quotes fm1900 TRAITORS http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/religion/2130557/posts?page=81#81)
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To: LibWhacker

Fascinating!


91 posted on 02/03/2010 7:55:31 AM PST by brytlea (Jesus loves me, this I know.)
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To: txhurl

Somehow that sounds painful...


92 posted on 02/03/2010 7:59:35 AM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: krb

Thank you, that was very interesting. I often use glass in my kiln, and I’m always interested in learning more about it!


93 posted on 02/03/2010 8:00:54 AM PST by brytlea (Jesus loves me, this I know.)
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To: MHGinTN

Oh man, I once accidentally sprayed hairspray right into my eye. It broke into little shards like glass! I would keep this material away from my eyes too.


94 posted on 02/03/2010 8:04:24 AM PST by brytlea (Jesus loves me, this I know.)
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To: smokingfrog

Me too, I can think of some cool applications!


95 posted on 02/03/2010 8:06:11 AM PST by brytlea (Jesus loves me, this I know.)
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To: krb

Palomar Observatory lenses


96 posted on 02/03/2010 8:17:12 AM PST by MHGinTN (Obots, believing they cannot be deceived, it is impossible to convince them when they are deceived.)
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To: decimon; Las Vegas Dave; ShadowAce; AdmSmith; Berosus; bigheadfred; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; ...
The liquid glass spray (technically termed "SiO2 ultra-thin layering") consists of almost pure silicon dioxide (silica, the normal compound in glass) extracted from quartz sand. Water or ethanol is added, depending on the type of surface to be coated. There are no additives, and the nano-scale glass coating bonds to the surface because of the quantum forces involved. According to the manufacturers, liquid glass has a long-lasting antibacterial effect because microbes landing on the surface cannot divide or replicate easily.
Or maybe they're captivated by their own image, like the mythical Narcissus. ;') Thanks LibWhacker.
97 posted on 02/03/2010 4:13:23 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: krb
Glass is interesting. As an amorphous solid, it has no crystalline structure to lock the atoms in place. The base material, silicon dioxide (quartz) does have a crystal structure, but the stuff added to it to make glass prevents crystal formation. That makes it plastic at relatively low temperatures. It's essentially a solid at room temps and has no viscosity, but the temps that it starts flowing at vary wildly, depending on the dopants. Pretty cool stuff.

However, my BS meter is going off at the idea of a water- or alcohol "soluable glass".

98 posted on 02/06/2010 11:15:33 PM PST by VanShuyten ("a shadow...draped nobly in the folds of a gorgeous eloquence.")
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To: LibWhacker
soon almost every product you purchase will be coated with liquid glass.

Can't wait until toddlers chew on them and breathe in and swallow glass fibers. "Binder & Binder" plese pick up the white courtesy phone.

99 posted on 02/06/2010 11:38:12 PM PST by montag813
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