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Silver coin dating to 211 BC is oldest piece of Roman money ever found in Britain
Daily Mail ^ | Friday, January 29th, 2010 | Daily Mail Reporter

Posted on 02/02/2010 9:15:34 PM PST by SunkenCiv

Dating from 211 BC and found near the Leicestershire village of Hallaton, the coin was uncovered with 5,000 other coins, a helmet and a decorated bowl.

Unearthed in 2000 by a metal detectorist, staff at the nearby Harborough Museum have only just realised its significance.

One side of the coin depicts the goddess Roma wearing her characteristic helmet while mythical twins Castor and Pollux sit astride galloping horses on the reverse.

David Sprason, Leicestershire County Council cabinet member for communities and well-being said: 'Leicestershire boasts the largest number of Iron Age coins ever professionally excavated in Britain.

'To also have the oldest Roman coin ever found is something very special.'

The type of coin, known as a denarius, was first struck in Rome in 211 BC, making the Hallaton coin a very early version, the council said...

Professor David Mattingly of the University of Leicester's School of Archaeology and Ancient History... added... 'It was minted in Rome at the time of the Hannibalic wars and here it is turning up after what must have been quite a long journey,' he said.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: ancientrome; archaeology; ccxi; coin; coins; epigraphyandlanguage; godsgravesglyphs; unitedkingdom
This 2,221-year-old coin dug up as part of a hoard is the oldest piece of Roman money ever found in Britain

Silver coin dating to 211 BC is oldest piece of Roman money ever found in Britain

1 posted on 02/02/2010 9:15:36 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: SunkenCiv

Damn, I just used my last one in a Coke machine!


2 posted on 02/02/2010 9:17:31 PM PST by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Some Scot has been saving it all this time...


3 posted on 02/02/2010 9:21:02 PM PST by nickcarraway
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To: SunkenCiv

One wonders if they payed the finder accordingly being it was 10 years ago.


4 posted on 02/02/2010 9:25:18 PM PST by PeaceBeWithYou (De Oppresso Liber! (50 million and counting in Afganistan and Iraq))
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To: SunkenCiv

Looks like a Mercury dime!


5 posted on 02/02/2010 9:27:03 PM PST by Inyo-Mono (Had God not driven man from the Garden of Eden the Sierra Club surely would have.)
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To: SunkenCiv

WOW!


6 posted on 02/02/2010 9:27:34 PM PST by A. Morgan (The ONE is a BIG LIAR!)
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To: SunkenCiv; mikrofon; martin_fierro

If you look closely—it’s a little faded—you can even see the inscription, “CCXI A.C.” (211 Ante Christum, “Before Christ”), thus proving its antiquity.


7 posted on 02/02/2010 9:34:50 PM PST by Charles Henrickson (Veni, Vidi, Vicki: "I came, I saw, and I'm like, Omigod!")
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To: Charles Henrickson
I see it!

Image and video hosting by TinyPic

8 posted on 02/02/2010 9:39:02 PM PST by Inyo-Mono (Had God not driven man from the Garden of Eden the Sierra Club surely would have.)
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To: PeaceBeWithYou

The finder gets paid. The coin would be independently valued (and not of course just for its silver content, but for its extraordinary provenance.)


9 posted on 02/02/2010 10:06:13 PM PST by agere_contra
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To: nickcarraway

I don’t care who you are that’s funny right there.


10 posted on 02/02/2010 10:56:55 PM PST by BenKenobi (;)
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extremely cool!


11 posted on 02/02/2010 11:09:56 PM PST by AmericanArchConservative (Armour on, Lances high, Swords out, Bows drawn, Shields front ... Eagles UP!)
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To: SunkenCiv
I know where a treasure is located near Sardis, Turkey. Of course it is a hunch. Near Sardis is a temple. The temple is across the highway and down a dirt road. From the temple location you can rock formations, like cliffs. Had the hunch or feeling when I visited there in 1980. There is a treasure, in a tomb placed in those cliffs. Photobucket
12 posted on 02/03/2010 3:32:49 AM PST by bushpilot1
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To: Charles Henrickson; SunkenCiv; martin_fierro

{From a faded scroll near the ‘stash’}

“AVRVM - NON NEQVAM VMQVAM EST”


13 posted on 02/03/2010 9:08:28 AM PST by mikrofon ("For over MM Anni")
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To: Inyo-Mono
That's clearly a fake.

The Romans never would have stamped "211 B.C." in Arabic numerals ;-)

14 posted on 02/03/2010 9:11:00 AM PST by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: Joe 6-pack
The Romans never would have stamped "211 B.C." in Arabic numerals ;-)

If it was stamped CCXI B.C. they might have pulled it off. ;>)

15 posted on 02/03/2010 10:59:58 AM PST by Donald Rumsfeld Fan (Sarah Palin "the Thrilla from Wasilla")
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To: PeaceBeWithYou

And since it *was* ten years ago, the coin must really be from 221 BC! ;’)


16 posted on 02/03/2010 3:18:26 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: Charles Henrickson

;’)


17 posted on 02/03/2010 3:20:10 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: nickcarraway

;’)


18 posted on 02/03/2010 3:21:53 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: bushpilot1

Generally ancient tombs had little in them due to the fact that they’d be looted. The so-called Treasury of Atreus — a spectacular example of Mycenaean corbelled dome — was more than likely built as a tomb and probably loaded with riches. There’s not even an old local tradition of how the place was raided, and literally nothing remains inside the thing, other than air. :’) The locals always find stuff and loot it for their own benefit (which, face it, most of us would too) and they’ve had centuries to do so. I’d like to think that there’s *something* around just waiting, but it’s not too likely. :’)


19 posted on 02/03/2010 3:25:35 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: SunkenCiv

From article:

“The coin would have passed through many hands, he added.”

The find does NOT tell when it arrived in Britain, or who brought it.

It is often learned that trade and travel occurred earlier and of more distances.


20 posted on 02/03/2010 3:33:21 PM PST by truth_seeker
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To: SunkenCiv

I guess Roman coins pretty well used Imperator portraits rather than symbolic pictures starting with Julius Caesar. Some did have dates in the form ‘in the xth year in the Consulship of a and b’, I believe.


21 posted on 02/03/2010 3:38:34 PM PST by Lucius Cornelius Sulla (Pray for my soul. More things are wrought by prayer Than this world dreams of.-- Idylls of the King)
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To: SunkenCiv
Photobucket Photobucket Visited Sardis several times when I was assigned to a Nato base in Izmir. Since I visited the temple site, my gut kept telling me there is a tomb filled with gold at the base of the mountain. Somehow it is related to Alexander.
22 posted on 02/03/2010 4:53:53 PM PST by bushpilot1
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To: wazoo1031

Ping!


23 posted on 02/03/2010 4:54:37 PM PST by Allegra (It doesn't matter what this tagline says...the liberals are going to call it "racist.")
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To: bushpilot1

That is interesting, really. It’s not talked about, but a great many of the headline-grabbing discoveries have been attributed by their discoverers to that kind of feeling, hunch, whatever term. I’m trying to remember off the top of my head if ‘Lex wandered through Sardis on the way to conquering the Persian Empire.


24 posted on 02/03/2010 5:31:55 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: SunkenCiv

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9907E4DE1539EF3ABC4C52DFB0668389639EDE

hahaha getting interesting. Located this a few minutes ago.

Gold coins found in 1922


25 posted on 02/03/2010 6:06:52 PM PST by bushpilot1
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