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Virus infections may be contributing factor in onset of gluten intolerance
Academy of Finland ^ | Mar 5, 2010 | Unknown

Posted on 03/05/2010 7:24:29 AM PST by decimon

Recent research findings indicate a possible connection between virus infections, the immune system and the onset of gluten intolerance, also known as coeliac disease. A research project in the Academy of Finland's Research Programme on Nutrition, Food and Health (ELVIRA) has brought new knowledge on the hereditary nature of gluten intolerance and identified genes that carry a higher risk of developing the condition. Research has shown that the genes in question are closely linked with the human immune system and the occurrence of inflammations, rather than being connected with the actual breakdown of gluten in the digestive tract.

"Some of the genes we have identified are linked with human immune defence against viruses. This may indicate that virus infections may be connected in some way with the onset of gluten intolerance," says Academy Research Fellow Päivi Saavalainen, who has conducted research into the hereditary risk factors for gluten intolerance.

Saavalainen explains that the genes that predispose people to gluten intolerance are very widespread in the population and, as a result, they are only a minor part of the explanation for the way in which gluten intolerance is inherited. However, the knowledge of the genes behind gluten intolerance is valuable in itself, as it helps researchers explore the reasons behind gluten intolerance, which in turn builds potential for developing new treatments and preventive methods. This is essential, because the condition is often relatively symptom-free, yet it can have serious complications unless treated.

Researchers have localised the risk genes by using data on patients and on entire families. The material in the Finnish study is part of a very extensive study of thousands of people with gluten intolerance and control groups in nine different populations. The research will be published in a coming issue of Nature Genetics.

Research into hereditary conditions has made great progress over the past few years. Gene researchers now face their next challenge, as a closer analysis is now needed of the risk factors in the genes that predispose people to gluten intolerance. It is important to discover how they impact on gene function and what part they play in the onset of gluten intolerance.

Gluten intolerance is an autoimmune reaction in the small intestine. Roughly one in a hundred Finns suffer from this condition. The gluten that occurs naturally in grains such as wheat, barley and rye causes damage to the intestinal villi, problems with nutrient absorption and potentially other problems too. Gluten intolerance is an inherited predisposition, and nearly all sufferers carry the genes that play a key part in the onset of the condition. The only known effective treatment is a lifelong gluten-free diet.

###

More information:

Academy Research Fellow Päivi Saavalainen, University of Helsinki, tel. +358(0)9 474 25086, paivi.saavalainen@helsinki.fi

Academy of Finland Communications Riitta Tirronen, communications manager tel. +358(0)9 7748 8369 riitta.tirronen@aka.fi


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: celiac; celiacdisease; foodallergy; gluten; glutenfree; glutenintolerance; health; virus; wheatfree; wheatgluten

1 posted on 03/05/2010 7:24:29 AM PST by decimon
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To: neverdem; DvdMom

Cassandra ping.


2 posted on 03/05/2010 7:25:07 AM PST by decimon
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To: muawiyah; blam; JoeProBono; SunkenCiv; Smokin' Joe

*ping*


3 posted on 03/05/2010 7:43:38 AM PST by hennie pennie
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To: decimon

Thanks for posting. I noticed they did not give the name of the gene in question? Dogtor J, John Symes DVM, has an interesting theory about viruses and immune response.

Try www.dogtorj.com

Cheers.


4 posted on 03/05/2010 7:46:56 AM PST by blackpacific
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To: decimon
gluten intolerance

How does one know if your computer has this?

5 posted on 03/05/2010 7:49:12 AM PST by TruthWillWin (The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other peoples money.)
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To: Marie

*ping*


6 posted on 03/05/2010 7:57:21 AM PST by hennie pennie
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To: blackpacific

This may prove to be helpful:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/1046/1/Understanding-the-Genetics-of-Gluten-Sensitivity-by-Dr-Scot-Lewey/Page1.html


7 posted on 03/05/2010 8:00:48 AM PST by Carpe Cerevisi
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To: TruthWillWin

It won’t let you load Toast....


8 posted on 03/05/2010 8:12:33 AM PST by conservativeharleyguy (Democrats: Over 60 million fooled daily!)
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To: TruthWillWin

“How does one know if your computer has this?”

Core dumps from a port on the rear panel.


9 posted on 03/05/2010 9:10:25 AM PST by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: 2ndreconmarine; Fitzcarraldo; Covenantor; Mother Abigail; EBH; Dog Gone; ...

Ping...(Thanks, hennie pennie!)


10 posted on 03/05/2010 10:10:18 AM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: decimon

My understanding is that something like that can cause lactose intolerance as well.

My daughter developed lactose intolerance after having her appendix out and it has gradually cleared up.

My sister had it for a few years and it went away on it’s own as well.

It wouldn’t surprise me that other intolerances are a result of a disturbance of the intestines.


11 posted on 03/05/2010 10:14:11 AM PST by metmom (Welfare was never meant to be a career choice.)
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To: Smokin' Joe

Thanks for the ping! I just forwarded the link to my sister, who has celiac disease.


12 posted on 03/05/2010 10:16:36 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: metmom
Lactose intolerance was the initial outward expression of gluten intolerance in my case. Lactase is generated on the tips of the cilia of the small intestine. Exposure to gluten damages the cilia. The tips are damaged first. The absence of lactase is experienced with acid, gas and abdominal cramps as the bacteria (typicall E. Coli) convert lactose to acid and gas.

Gluten intolerance includes versions of proteins that bind to the gliaden protein component of gluten. It is bound in a manner that optimally exposes the antigenic surface for the immune system to mount an immune response. In addition, the cells of the small intestine normally have "tight junctions" to limit passage of large particles into the blood stream. In gluten intolerant individuals, the immune response to gliaden provokes expression of "zonulin". The zonulin protein turns the tight junctions into "loose junctions". Larger particles in the digestive tract can pass into the blood stream. That expands the possibilities for expose of more antigens to the immune system.

There is a variant of the casein protein in Holstein sourced cow's milk that produces peptides with a morphine like structure when hydrolyzed by digestive enzymes. In a gluten intolerant individual, this morphine like substance can pass into the blood and produce a narcotic impact on the brain. The simple fix is to avoid gluten and dairy. Sometimes it is not so easy. Unintended exposure leads to a few days of extended trips to the "reading room".

13 posted on 03/05/2010 10:49:17 AM PST by Myrddin
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To: Myrddin

There is a fascinating discovery of the difference between the A1 beta-casein variant, and the A2 beta-casein variant, as chronicled in the book “The Devil in the Milk” by Kenneth Woodward. Some line of cattle have A2 capability, but most have A1. Since it is a double allele thing, the possibilities are 100% A1, 50-50 A1 A2, or 100% A2. A2 milk is the ideal, which goats produce exclusively, but it can be bred into lines of cattle. BCM7 is the “devil” in our milk.


14 posted on 03/05/2010 11:12:25 AM PST by blackpacific
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To: decimon; hennie pennie; Mother Abigail; EBH; vetvetdoug; Smokin' Joe; Global2010; Battle Axe; ...
genome-wide association study = GWAS, single nucleotide polymorphisms = SNPs

Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression.

People with gluten intolerance and other associated malabsorption syndromes – such as celiac/coeliac disease, celiac sprue, non-tropical sprue, endemic sprue, gluten enteropathy, and gluten-sensitive enteropathy – have challenging dietary concerns.a>

15 posted on 03/05/2010 12:22:05 PM PST by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: TruthWillWin

“How does one know if your computer has this?”

it would feel ill when you crush wheat toast crumbs into the keyboard......sarc/


16 posted on 03/05/2010 3:02:16 PM PST by Mrs. B.S. Roberts
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To: blackpacific
I purchased a quart of goat milk for our St. David's Day cooking on Monday. I've been using the balance in my coffee this week with no ill effects. A gluten free diet with goat's milk in place of cow's milk seems to be OK.
17 posted on 03/05/2010 3:35:04 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: hennie pennie; AdmSmith; Berosus; bigheadfred; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; Ernest_at_the_Beach; ...

Maybe a virus is also behind the intolerance of the left wing? Thanks hp.


18 posted on 03/05/2010 8:44:37 PM PST by SunkenCiv (Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: Smokin' Joe

Thanks for the ping!


19 posted on 03/05/2010 9:31:50 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: Myrddin
Goats milk makes excellent yogurt.
20 posted on 03/05/2010 10:27:36 PM PST by kitchen (One battle rifle for each person, and a spare for each pair.)
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To: Smokin' Joe; Joya

Bump and Ping.


21 posted on 03/06/2010 1:13:59 AM PST by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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To: nw_arizona_granny; decimon

Thanks.


22 posted on 03/06/2010 1:37:21 AM PST by Joya (Lord Jesus Christ, Son of God, Savior, have mercy on me, a sinner!)
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To: Joya

You are welcome.


23 posted on 03/06/2010 2:01:50 AM PST by nw_arizona_granny ( garden/survival/cooking/storage- http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2299939/posts?page=5555)
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