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Scrapple: Pork Mush—The Pennsylvania Treat
globalgourmet ^ | Lynn Kerrigan

Posted on 03/06/2010 9:36:55 AM PST by JoeProBono

Unless you live in the Middle Atlantic states, you may have never had the dubious pleasure of breakfasting on scrapple—a fried slice of pork-mush. Often erroneously called Philadelphia Scrapple, it's really a dish that originated in the Eastern Pennsylvania farmlands of German born settlers—far from the city of Brotherly Love.

It's dictionary defined as "cornmeal mush made with the meat and broth of pork, seasoned with onions, spices and herbs and shaped into loaves for slicing and frying." The word, scrapple originates from "scrap" or "scrappy" meaning made up of odds and ends for that's exactly what it is—boiled, ground leftover pig scraps with cornmeal and spices thrown in. Scrapple lovers think of it as food for the gods. Anti-scrapplers consider it a culinary abomination.

Scrapple is the unique creation of the Pennsylvania Dutch, and therefore only quasi-American as the immigrants combined their German heritage with New World ingredients. The term "Pennsylvania Dutch" is a corrupted form of Pennsylvania Deutsche, mostly transplanted Rhineland farmers who worked hard and ate heartily. They are frugal people and many of their dishes make imaginative use of every part of the butchered hog's anatomy. Scrapple is one of them.

But what parts of the hog go into the creation of scrapple? After the ham, bacon, chops and other cuts of meat are taken from the butchered pig—what remains are fixings for scrapple—including the meat scraped off the head. Scrapple may contain pork skin, pork heart, pork liver, pork tongue—even pork brains. Those faint of palate needn't venture any further.

If one can get past what goes into making scrapple, he or she may discover it tastes surprising good—like country-style pork sausage with a unique shape and texture. It's a deck of cards sized slab, crispy on the outside, soft inside and may be embellished with butter, maple syrup, applesauce, ketchup or mashed in with its usual partner: a plateful of fried eggs. Besides, modern day recipes make no use of questionable pork parts. (See recipes below.)

Being born and raised in Pennsylvania, I was destined to have a piece of a scrapple slapped across my breakfast plate. Being a good source of cheap protein, it often made a morning appearance at our table. I didn't quite relish it because of its gray color. That may have been the fault of my mother, the cook. Properly prepared and fried, scrapple should be a tasty looking golden brown.

Although edible raw, Scrapple is usually sliced and fried in butter or lard. Served in a deep, placid pool of egg yolk and ketchup, it is a veritable cholesterol meltdown.


TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS: jpb; pennsylvania; scrapple
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1 posted on 03/06/2010 9:36:55 AM PST by JoeProBono
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To: JoeProBono

2 posted on 03/06/2010 9:38:49 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: JoeProBono

3 posted on 03/06/2010 9:41:57 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: JoeProBono
Looks offal. :)
4 posted on 03/06/2010 9:41:58 AM PST by gundog (A republic...if you can keep it.)
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To: gundog

Deeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeelicious...and, as the story said “But what parts of the hog go into the creation of scrapple? After the ham, bacon...” proves the old adage that EVERYTHING tastes good with Bacon.


5 posted on 03/06/2010 9:44:31 AM PST by jessduntno (They'll get my false teeth when they pry them from my sister's cold, dead mouth!)
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To: JoeProBono

Some of those same German settlers migrated to North Carolina in the 1750’s and gave the world Liver Mush. Very similar, just limited to liver instead of offal. One might consider that an improvement, lol.


6 posted on 03/06/2010 9:44:49 AM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

7 posted on 03/06/2010 9:47:33 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: JoeProBono

For those of gentle palate, and children not very fond of pork, the alternative to scrapple is fried cornmeal mush. Properly prepared, then fried in bacon grease or vegetable oil, with some maple syrup on top, it is a much milder companion to scrapple.


8 posted on 03/06/2010 9:47:50 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: JoeProBono

In my part of Penna, the home butchers cooked the scrap part of scrapple and poured it into pans and covered it with melted lard for preservation. This was commonly called puddins.
>p<This was heated for breakfast along with cornmeal mush. The mush was mixed on the plate with the puddins. Eggs and potatoes were also served. The left over mush was cooled in pans so that it could be fried for lunchtime ‘dinner’ or evening ‘supper’ served with molasses or if desired some more puddins.


9 posted on 03/06/2010 9:49:02 AM PST by oldtimer2 (The majority is not silent--The government is deaf)
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To: jessduntno
But what parts of the hog go into the creation of scrapple?

Everything but the squeal, minus the ham and bacon.

10 posted on 03/06/2010 9:49:12 AM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: JoeProBono
Scrapple is the unique creation of the Pennsylvania Dutch, and therefore only quasi-American as the immigrants combined their German heritage with New World ingredients.

That's actually about as good a definition of "American" as one could ask for.

11 posted on 03/06/2010 9:49:38 AM PST by Sherman Logan ( .)
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To: JoeProBono
Scrapple Rules! Especially Habersett's!

Lamh Foistenach Abu!
12 posted on 03/06/2010 9:50:06 AM PST by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines, RVN 1969. St. Michael the Archangel defend us in battle!)
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To: JoeProBono

Heart attack on a plate..that’s eat’in!!!!


13 posted on 03/06/2010 9:50:06 AM PST by John 3_19-21 (Where are the leaders?)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

I love Scrapple! My wife hates the smell so I can’t cook it.


14 posted on 03/06/2010 9:50:21 AM PST by whitedog57
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To: JoeProBono

sweepings, that’s what goes in scrapple.

Bridgeville Delaware has an Apple/Scrapple festival at the end of summer!

Scrapple sandwich on white bread with american cheese ketchup, add a fried egg if it’s breakfast time. mmm mmm good.

Personally I prefer Rappa brand.


15 posted on 03/06/2010 9:51:32 AM PST by lack-of-trust
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To: JoeProBono

The young woman seems to have thrived upon it. Clearly an important part of a healthy diet, lol.


16 posted on 03/06/2010 9:52:48 AM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

17 posted on 03/06/2010 9:54:35 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: JoeProBono

How about some chicken rivvel soup on the side and shoo fly pie for dessert?


18 posted on 03/06/2010 9:55:21 AM PST by dainbramaged (If you want a friend, get a dog.)
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To: JoeProBono

Seriously.. having been to several food magazine photo shoots I could here a conversation for these pics that might go something like this:

Food Stylist: “what are we shooting today ?”

Director; “Scrapple”

Food Stylist; “What’s Scrapple.”

Director; “You don’t want to know, just make it look good.”


19 posted on 03/06/2010 9:55:41 AM PST by John 3_19-21 (Where are the leaders?)
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To: oldtimer2

my local ACME sells corn meal mush in a loaf, for slicing and frying. I think the brand name is Kinsler.


20 posted on 03/06/2010 9:58:42 AM PST by lack-of-trust
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To: Sherman Logan

Good ol’ NC barbecue is about as authentic and as early of a New World cuisine as you can find. The earliest settlers at Jamestown were taught pit-cooking methods by the Powhatan and other tribes, and the vinegary sauce is a survival of the original, herb-vinegar “catsup” of Elizabethan times. Even the cornmeal hushpuppy accompaniment is native fusion.


21 posted on 03/06/2010 9:59:29 AM PST by RegulatorCountry
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To: JoeProBono

The Scrapple I buy acutally lists pig snouts as ingredients. I love it.


22 posted on 03/06/2010 10:00:23 AM PST by PLMerite (Ride to the sound of the Guns - I'll probably need help.)
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To: JoeProBono
Mrs. shove_it is from Lebanon. As an expert in these matters, she says you need to molasses on it. Other delicacies of the PA Dutch region are pickled pigs feet jelly and stuffed pigs stomach.
23 posted on 03/06/2010 10:00:37 AM PST by shove_it (and have a nice day)
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To: whitedog57

WD

does your gas grill have one of those side burners that you never use.... Fry it outside and the neighbors will be lined up at the fence!


24 posted on 03/06/2010 10:01:55 AM PST by lack-of-trust
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To: JoeProBono
I love the "Cincinnati" version called "goetta" made with ground beef, pork and pinhead oatmeal. Same spice profile.

Delicious!

25 posted on 03/06/2010 10:03:39 AM PST by Species8472 (The problem with political jokes is that they get elected)
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To: JoeProBono

The parts of the pig that aren’t suitable to be shrink-wrapped go into sausage. The parts of the pig that aren’t suitable for sausage go into scrapple.


26 posted on 03/06/2010 10:03:42 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: whitedog57

“I love Scrapple! My wife hates the smell so I can’t cook it.”

Tell her you’ll start cooking chitlins and hog maws...she’ll beg you to make scrapple.


27 posted on 03/06/2010 10:04:54 AM PST by jessduntno (They'll get my false teeth when they pry them from my sister's cold, dead mouth!)
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To: JoeProBono

That looks about right. I’ve found lard works better than butter as it takes the heat better and browns better but I wouldn’t complain either way with a bit of salt and pepper. Add a mug of coffee...yes!


28 posted on 03/06/2010 10:07:35 AM PST by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: jessduntno

29 posted on 03/06/2010 10:07:57 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: JoeProBono

Yum! In the South we chop it up and mix it in with the scrambled eggs. At least that’s how my mother from Alabama made it. Now I’m have to put some on my shopping list.


30 posted on 03/06/2010 10:08:24 AM PST by BubbaBasher ("Liberty will not long survive the total extinction of morals" - Sam Adams)
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To: JoeProBono

(With all due respect to B. Hussein Obama) mmm mmm mmm...


31 posted on 03/06/2010 10:10:29 AM PST by jessduntno (They'll get my false teeth when they pry them from my sister's cold, dead mouth!)
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To: lack-of-trust

Rappa Brand is the only brand I will cook. I slice very thin, fry the slices until very crispy and put them between two slices of buttered toast, usually from white bread. The slices are kind of stacked up two or three thick on the one slice of toast, so there’s enough Scrapple to balance the amount of toast for taste and texture.

It’s an art.


32 posted on 03/06/2010 10:11:35 AM PST by savedbygrace (You are only leading if people follow. Otherwise, you just wandered off.)
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To: JoeProBono

Yep...back in training days, I roomed with a guy from Kennett Square, PA (not surprising, he was a Quaker). Learned a few things from him: scrapple and eggs, where the best mushrooms come from and how to make a good martini.


33 posted on 03/06/2010 10:11:54 AM PST by Pharmboy (The Stone Age did not end because they ran out of stones...)
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To: BubbaBasher

34 posted on 03/06/2010 10:13:40 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: Pharmboy
Ah.. Kennett Square - Mushrooms!


35 posted on 03/06/2010 10:17:19 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: JoeProBono

I must say, this scrapple looks quite tasty.


36 posted on 03/06/2010 10:17:51 AM PST by Yardstick
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To: savedbygrace

my mother slices hers thin/fried crisp through and covers with maple syrup.

I like mine thick, crusty on the outside and soft in the middle.


37 posted on 03/06/2010 10:17:56 AM PST by lack-of-trust
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To: JoeProBono

Try scrapple on toast with yellow mustard. Delightful!!!


38 posted on 03/06/2010 10:18:42 AM PST by DarthVader (Liberalism is the politics of EVIL whose time of judgment has come.)
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To: lack-of-trust

Well, you’re both wrong.

(just kidding)


39 posted on 03/06/2010 10:19:38 AM PST by savedbygrace (You are only leading if people follow. Otherwise, you just wandered off.)
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To: JoeProBono

Got tears in my eyes just looking at those pictures, I haven’t had scrapple in YEARS!
I grew up in South Jersey and have lived in Texas since ‘79.
I miss scrapple, Tastykakes, good pizza (the kind made by Italians that can barely speak English) and a really good tomato.

A Cheddars restaurant opened in Katy last year so I can get a really good cheese steak sandwich.

Other than missing a few things I do love Texas!


40 posted on 03/06/2010 10:23:07 AM PST by Just A Reader
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To: JoeProBono

Yep...I used to look forward to when my roomie used to go home for the weekend and return with those mushrooms. I have never been able to find mushrooms that white since...and they tasted great too...


41 posted on 03/06/2010 10:25:24 AM PST by Pharmboy (The Stone Age did not end because they ran out of stones...)
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To: DarthVader
>"yellow mustard"

Par le vu frances ?


42 posted on 03/06/2010 10:26:05 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: JoeProBono

Scrapple and fried bread! Staples as a kid in NJ. Not available in SE Wisconsin unfortuantely.


43 posted on 03/06/2010 10:29:09 AM PST by PIF
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To: JoeProBono

Since my wife and I both come from Philadelphia, we grew up eating scrapple and we love it. We grill it for breakfast, garnish it with horseradish and serve it with eggs. MMMMM GOOD!


44 posted on 03/06/2010 10:31:57 AM PST by blau993 (Fight Gerbil Swarming)
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To: blau993
Horseradish - good idea!


45 posted on 03/06/2010 10:39:28 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: dirtboy
The parts of the pig that aren’t suitable to be shrink-wrapped go into sausage.

The Louisiana cajuns make a sausage called boudin with similar ingredients but with rice instead of cornmeal. I love it and use it in many different ways, some with the casing on and some with it stripped and mixed with other ingredients.

I use it to accompany gumbo rather than steamed rice. In fact, I was thinking about a crawfish etouffee for later today and I might put it over boudin instead of rice!

46 posted on 03/06/2010 10:43:52 AM PST by Mind-numbed Robot (Not all that needs to be done needs to be done by the government)
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To: gundog

Well, it isn’t. It’s deeeeeeelicious. Nothing like a LARGE SLAB OF Habbersett’s scrapple laying across your plate. MMMMMMMmmmmm, good.


47 posted on 03/06/2010 10:50:43 AM PST by cubreporter (Scott Brown turned it all around. The people CAN and DID make a difference!!!)
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To: jessduntno

Well cook it outside like one of the other freepers just said.


48 posted on 03/06/2010 10:51:38 AM PST by cubreporter (Scott Brown turned it all around. The people CAN and DID make a difference!!!)
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To: savedbygrace

It’s an art and deeeeeeeeeeeeeelicious. :) Enjoy.


49 posted on 03/06/2010 10:52:21 AM PST by cubreporter (Scott Brown turned it all around. The people CAN and DID make a difference!!!)
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To: DarthVader

I will definitely try that.


50 posted on 03/06/2010 10:53:08 AM PST by cubreporter (Scott Brown turned it all around. The people CAN and DID make a difference!!!)
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