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Foreign Students See Kimchi as Most Korean Item
Korea Times ^ | 03-16-2010 | Bae Ji-sook

Posted on 03/17/2010 12:28:14 PM PDT by nickcarraway

Foreign students selected kimchi ― fermented cabbage seasoned with red pepper ― as the most representative of Korea, a recent survey showed.

``Hallyu,'' the new wave of Korean pop culture, often proves to be a key factor to pique their interest in Korea. And the longer they stay, the more they become attached to kimchi.

The survey was conducted by the Sogang University Language Education Center and asked 101 foreign students about what item they most associate with Korea.

Thirty-three of the respondents started studying Korean language because they liked its pop culture, mostly TV dramas. However, when asked what the most memorable and impressive thing in Korea was, 42 respondents picked kimchi.

Sogang University suggested that, besides the spicy flavor of the fermented cabbage, kimchi represents Korea's dinner table culture.

"Many students told me that they were impressed by our social and family gatherings, where we grill meat and eat it with a glass of soju. Unlike many parts of the world, we share the food from a big bowl, share drinks and glasses, make friends and have a great time. At the end of the day, we all end up feeling like a large family," Prof. Lee Dong-il of the center said. "Since kimchi is a staple side dish at these occasions, they link it with Korea."

Choi Jung-hwa, director of the Corea Image Communication Institute, said kimchi represents Koreans. "There is nothing like kimchi. Fermentation requires time and patience, which also applies to the characteristics of Koreans. It is also spicy yet very humble. Once you get used to its flavor you instantly notice that it is the essence of the Korean spirit.

"Also, the survey results show that people define a country by its food. Kimchi, one of the most unique foods in the world, is just right for symbolizing Korea."

Meanwhile, the state-of-the-art information and technology as electronic gadgets were the second and third things that came to their minds regarding Korea, the survey showed.

It said that pronunciation was the hardest part about learning the Korean language.

The students said their favorite Korean terms included "heobeolagae" (extremely) and "aigo" (oh my goodness).


TOPICS: Food; Local News; Travel
KEYWORDS: kimchi; korean

1 posted on 03/17/2010 12:28:14 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: Tamar1973; dynachrome

Ping


2 posted on 03/17/2010 12:28:33 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

One of my favorite foods.


3 posted on 03/17/2010 12:29:17 PM PDT by mnehring
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To: nickcarraway

More Korean than cheap phones and hair that sticks straight up?


4 posted on 03/17/2010 12:29:49 PM PDT by Defiant (We are in a battle to the death between Karl and George. I will stand and fight for George.)
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To: nickcarraway

I’ve only visited Korea a couple of times - but I love Kimchi too!


5 posted on 03/17/2010 12:29:58 PM PDT by PGR88 (I'm so open-minded, my brains fell out.)
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To: nickcarraway

Yeah - all Hanguk smells like kimchi until you get high up into the hills.


6 posted on 03/17/2010 12:30:15 PM PDT by Chi-townChief
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To: nickcarraway

Growing up in the military, I often heard the phrase ‘You’re in deep kimchi’.

My Dad served a year in Korea and came back with a kimchi habit. Our fridge smelled like kimchi for a year afterwards. I came to appreciate the phrase ‘You’re in deep kimchi’ more grandly after that year.


7 posted on 03/17/2010 12:32:04 PM PDT by Anitius Severinus Boethius
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To: nickcarraway

What do they mean by Kimchi. My experience is everything possible is Kimchied; which is to say pickled with heavy peppers.


8 posted on 03/17/2010 12:33:28 PM PDT by equalitybeforethelaw
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To: nickcarraway

Kimchi smells like.....well light a cow pie on fire and multiply that smell by 1000.


9 posted on 03/17/2010 12:38:13 PM PDT by Grunthor (Mary was the temple of God, not the god of the temple)
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To: nickcarraway
The most Korean thing I can think of I cannot discuss on this forum.

But she was amazing....

10 posted on 03/17/2010 12:39:53 PM PDT by Lurker (The avalanche has begun. The pebbles no longer have a vote.)
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To: Anitius Severinus Boethius
My dad got hooked on curry in the China-Burma-India Campaign. He could make a panang curry that would keep me warm on the coldest day...
11 posted on 03/17/2010 12:45:15 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Impeachment !)
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To: mnehring
I enjoy kimshi, but not at every meal.

I may or not partake at dinner, but I'm disturbed a the notion that the plate I rejected at supper is again present at breakfast.

WTF?
I know it's not the same piece, but the die-cut appearance invariably leads to that conclusion.
12 posted on 03/17/2010 12:45:16 PM PDT by SJSAMPLE
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To: equalitybeforethelaw
What do they mean by Kimchi. My experience is everything possible is Kimchied; which is to say pickled with heavy peppers.

Kimchi takes many forms. I was told that the word simply meant a side-dish of some sorts.

At Ma's Shiktong in Songton (outside Osan AB), you could get about 20 versions of Kimchi. The primary version is the fermented pickled spiced cabbage - even that has two main versions - summer and winter. Ma's had the best pulgogi some 20 years ago.

13 posted on 03/17/2010 12:55:29 PM PDT by IYAS9YAS (The townhalls were going great until the oPods showed up.)
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To: nickcarraway; Tamar1973

Ha. Tamar would say that BYJ is the most Korean item/person!


14 posted on 03/17/2010 12:57:41 PM PDT by dynachrome (Barack Hussein Obama yunikku khinaaziir!)
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To: IYAS9YAS; equalitybeforethelaw

There are about 300 different forms of kimchi but in truth anything that can be pickled can be kimchi.


15 posted on 03/17/2010 1:04:31 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: nickcarraway

You have not had a Korean experience until you have had a Soju experience.


16 posted on 03/17/2010 1:05:20 PM PDT by Pavegunner72
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To: nickcarraway

I am hopelessly in love with grilled beef and kimchi. I LOVE IT..!


17 posted on 03/17/2010 1:05:59 PM PDT by TokuMei
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To: IYAS9YAS

I have had many a meal in Korea and gone through something like 15 entree’s/appetizers at a sitting with all representing “something” kimchi. All of it pretty good (note, it beat cold C-rations in winter). The beef bolgi was my prefered dish as long as I didn’t see a dog being butchered behind the resturant. They also make a ramen soup which is to die for. Same soup is available in Japan and China. Very good broth.


18 posted on 03/17/2010 1:11:04 PM PDT by equalitybeforethelaw
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To: Pavegunner72

You have not had a Korean experience until you have had a Soju experience.

I had a corporal in my platoon who was in a coma for two days because of Soju. Mean stuff. He never drank the stuff again. Smart man.


19 posted on 03/17/2010 1:12:34 PM PDT by equalitybeforethelaw
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To: equalitybeforethelaw

I searched a binjo ditch for 3 hours to find the 2 front teeth my buddy lost after he Soju’ed up and fell in the ditch.


20 posted on 03/17/2010 1:42:37 PM PDT by Pavegunner72
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To: Pavegunner72

I searched a binjo ditch for 3 hours to find the 2 front teeth my buddy lost after he Soju’ed up and fell in the ditch.

Mean stuff.


21 posted on 03/17/2010 1:46:20 PM PDT by equalitybeforethelaw
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To: mnehring

a favorite of mine. i actually grossed out an army aviator one saturday morning. he was qa student of my wife’ and couldn’t make the class that week. i sat down for breakfast at the other end of the tavble with leftover fried rice, scambled eggs, scrapple, and kimchi.


22 posted on 03/17/2010 2:26:02 PM PDT by bravo whiskey (If the little things really bother you, maybe it's because the big things are going well.)
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To: driftdiver
I'm surprised no one has mentioned rice with their Kimchi experiences. One is never served without the other. If you have a good Kimchi, you use the rice to cool your mouth back down.

One of my first memories of Korea back around 1977, I was flying on a UH-1H (Huey) into seoul. I looked down at the city and an overpowering smell hit me from several thousand feet. I asked the crewchief what the heck it was. He said "thats burnt diesel exhaust and Kimchi", then he went on to point out to me the tens of thousands of clay pots on the rooftops storing winter kimchi in the summer, and the thousands of diesel buses driving throughout Seoul.

23 posted on 03/17/2010 2:32:06 PM PDT by Hillbillary (I know how to deal with Communists, I still wear their scars on my back from Hollywood-Ronald Reagan)
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To: nickcarraway
Dont forget to order up a side of dog to go with that, too.


24 posted on 03/17/2010 3:33:34 PM PDT by scoobysnak71 (I'm light skinned with no negro dialect. Could you milk me?)
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To: equalitybeforethelaw
"What do they mean by Kimchi. My experience is everything possible is Kimchied; which is to say pickled with heavy peppers."

There are many varieties...pumpkin, cabbage, radish, cucumber, etc., but I think most Koreans and foreigners think of cabbage kimchi as the default. I suppose an American parallel would be if somebody asked if you wanted a "burger", and while they might be referring to a tofu burger, big mac, whopper, chicken burger, turkey burger, etc. chances are they're referring to a plain ole' hamburger.

25 posted on 03/17/2010 3:39:37 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: nickcarraway

Running neck & neck with internet porn.


26 posted on 03/17/2010 8:40:36 PM PDT by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus)
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