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Doubt Is Cast on Many Reports of Food Allergies
New York Times ^ | May 11, 2010 | Gina Kolata

Posted on 05/13/2010 1:41:01 PM PDT by decimon

Many who think they have food allergies actually do not.

A new report, commissioned by the federal government, finds the field is rife with poorly done studies, misdiagnoses and tests that can give misleading results.

While there is no doubt that people can be allergic to certain foods, with reproducible responses ranging from a rash to a severe life-threatening reaction, the true incidence of food allergies is only about 8 percent for children and less than 5 percent for adults, said Dr. Marc Riedl, an author of the new paper and an allergist and immunologist at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Yet about 30 percent of the population believe they have food allergies. And, Dr. Riedl said, about half the patients coming to his clinic because they had been told they had a food allergy did not really have one.

>

“Everyone has a different definition” of a food allergy, said Dr. Jennifer J. Schneider Chafen of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Palo Alto Health Care System in California and Stanford’s Center for Center for Primary Care and Outcomes Research, who was the lead author of the new report. People who receive a diagnosis after one of the two tests most often used — pricking the skin and injecting a tiny amount of the suspect food and looking in blood for IgE antibodies, the type associated with allergies — have less than a 50 percent chance of actually having a food allergy, the investigators found.

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: allergies; eian; fdeian; foodallergies; foodintolerance; genetics; gmo; journalism

1 posted on 05/13/2010 1:41:01 PM PDT by decimon
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To: neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers

Ping.


2 posted on 05/13/2010 1:41:45 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

I don’t beleive a word of this, the fact is allergies are increasing tremendously, mostly as a result of GMO Pharming, but not just the food, the terrible mold storms these crops release, and even worse, the various forms of fungal spores ...


3 posted on 05/13/2010 1:42:58 PM PDT by Scythian
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To: Scythian

I agree with your statement.


4 posted on 05/13/2010 1:44:51 PM PDT by svcw (Habakkuk 2:3)
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To: Scythian

Many people confuse an intolerance with an allergy. Allergy is defined as an immune system response.

A systemic reaction to a fungal toxin is not allergy.


5 posted on 05/13/2010 1:45:11 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: decimon
A new report, commissioned by the federal government, finds the field is rife with poorly done studies, misdiagnoses and tests that can give misleading results.

The same can be said about any given story from the NY Slimes...

6 posted on 05/13/2010 1:46:27 PM PDT by bcsco (Obama: Hokus Pokus POTUS)
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To: decimon

As someone who treats allergies, this is a very difficult situation to categorize at times. Blood and skin tests are not entirely foolproof, history is inconsistent and treatment strategies are not uniform. You can be allergic on a blood test but yet have no reaction when ingesting certain foods. Also, tests can be negative but severe reactions can also occur. Also no immunotherapy available for food allergies. Cannot give allergy shots for peanuts like we can for ragweed. So much to learn about food allergies.


7 posted on 05/13/2010 1:47:46 PM PDT by Ravi
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To: Scythian

I had to hold my son tight as the nurses poked him with a bunch of needles that had food traces. His back looked horrible with welts all over it from the places he got reactions.


8 posted on 05/13/2010 1:47:54 PM PDT by misterrob (Have you tea bagged a liberal today?)
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To: Ravi

About a year ago, I ate some walnuts. Then about a half hour later I went ou for a run. About half way into my run my throat started to close up. It was a windy day and I figured it was just my allergies kicking in. I started getting itchy.

I finished my run. By then my throat was really swollen and I had hives all over. I had never has anything like it. I jumped in my pool. Still I was reacting like crazy. I popped a benadryl and it started to calm down. It was like nothing I had experienced before or since. Hope it never happens again.

I went to the doc the next day. He said it was likely “exercise induced anaphylaxis” brought on by mold on the nuts.


9 posted on 05/13/2010 1:52:21 PM PDT by riri
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To: DBrow

explain, please. I have two children with severe reactions to peanuts, sesame paste & shellfish. Both tested positive for allergies. I’m not familiar with fungal toxins and related ‘systemic response’.

I’ve suspected exposure to artificial sweeteners during pregnancy to be a potential problem. I did not consume artificial sweeteners with two prior pregnancies, since weight wasn’t a concern, and neither child has any allergies.


10 posted on 05/13/2010 1:55:53 PM PDT by wtd
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To: riri

Hope I never get that. Mold on the nuts, that is.


11 posted on 05/13/2010 1:57:57 PM PDT by loungitude ( The truth hurts.)
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To: loungitude

Just don’t leave them laying around in the pantry for too long...(:


12 posted on 05/13/2010 2:00:15 PM PDT by riri
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To: Scythian; DBrow
Familiar with Doug Kaufmann? Fungus until proven otherwise...

http://www.knowthecause.com/

13 posted on 05/13/2010 2:01:43 PM PDT by petercooper (Ignorant Obama Voters: Happy Now?)
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To: petercooper

http://www.knowthecause.com/


14 posted on 05/13/2010 2:01:58 PM PDT by petercooper (Ignorant Obama Voters: Happy Now?)
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To: decimon

For lack of understanding, the public tends to describe a food intolerance as an allergy, but even doctors are not always clear about the distinction. Moreover, the available tests are cumbersome and not always reliable or consistent. The overall burden of offending substances makes a difference, as do nutritional status and recent or ongoing infections.


15 posted on 05/13/2010 2:04:34 PM PDT by Rockingham
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To: Ravi

I have had a lifelong ALLERGY to eggs and milk, and nearly died from an allergic reaction to cow’s milk as an infant. I still get severe, delayed reactions from exposure.

Now that I have a very severe allergy to latex, I have found that I have the same reaction to bananas, kiwis, avocados, as I do to latex. All of these are foods I used to love to eat.

I’m one of those people who never gets poison ivy, though, and if a tick bites me, it dies, LOL! Perhaps I am from a galaxy far, far away....


16 posted on 05/13/2010 2:08:10 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Holy Mary, Mother of God, please pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death.)
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To: Ravi

You seem to be supporting the ‘Who knows?’ tone of the article.


17 posted on 05/13/2010 2:08:20 PM PDT by decimon
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To: wtd

The peanut et al is n allergic reaction, IgE immunosystem gets triggered.

But exposure to fungal spores or bodies can make you ill, because of direct action of mycotoxins- not an allergy, a toxic response, not an immune response.

Lactose intolerance is not an allergy, those folks lack an enzyme to digest lactose. Milk allergy is like peanut allergy, an immunoresponse to a particular protein.

Have you been to www.foodallergy.org?

http://www.peanutallergy.com/ has good info and discussion forums, though they tend to be peopled by liberals who want to eliminate peanuts from the county rather than teach their kids to survive in a peanut world.


18 posted on 05/13/2010 2:21:14 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: decimon

How could so many people be allergic to their environment? It doesn’t make sense.


19 posted on 05/13/2010 2:23:11 PM PDT by TigersEye (0basma's father was a British subject. He can't be a "natural-born" citizen.)
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To: riri
By then my throat was really swollen and I had hives all over

You have AIDS.

20 posted on 05/13/2010 2:29:42 PM PDT by humblegunner (Pablo is very wily)
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To: TigersEye
How could so many people be allergic to their environment? It doesn’t make sense.

It's not entirely unrealistic. Only in the last 100 years or so have we had mass migrations of peoples to different regions and adopting different diets than those their ancestors have had traditionally for thousands of years. For example, if you take someone of northern European ancestry and stick them in the US Southwest, they will be exposed to a number of plants and other items that northern Europeans were never exposed to. Likewise for people from dry climates who move to, say, the Pacific Northwest where mold rules. Also, diets used to be region specific. Now you can get food from all around the world, year-round.
21 posted on 05/13/2010 2:31:06 PM PDT by fr_freak
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To: wtd

I had gestation diabetes with my 4th pregnancy and wasn’t allowed to eat anything with sugar at all. As much as I had a sweets craving during that time, I was afraid to ingest anything made with Nutrasweet or Equal. It was a l-o-o-ong pregnancy.


22 posted on 05/13/2010 2:33:58 PM PDT by murron (Proud Mom of a Marine Vet)
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To: fr_freak

My DNA traces back from N. America to Scotland/England to Europe to Eur-Asia to Africa. I guess that’s why I’m not allergic to anything. /s


23 posted on 05/13/2010 2:40:59 PM PDT by TigersEye (0basma's father was a British subject. He can't be a "natural-born" citizen.)
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To: DBrow

thanks . . .my kids are older (college) and manage to avoid food allergies quite well. The only time we were in a fix was on a flight with Continental Airlines a few years ago. The flight crew distributed peanuts as the in-flight snack. By the time we realized what was on the menu, half the plane already opened their snack pouches. Both boys have always been exposed to peanut butter at home since my second born survived on peanut butter (very picky eater)- though we kept the PB in another room & used separate utensils & cleaned them separately after each use. On the flight, we gave both boys a dose of benedryl and kept their EPI pens handy - just in case - and managed to complete the flight without incident. Not sure what we could have done if either of these two boys would have reacted mid flight and the EPI pens weren’t enough.


24 posted on 05/13/2010 2:43:48 PM PDT by wtd
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To: Judith Anne
Have you ever had exczema as well? My sister couldn’t drink cow’s milk as a child, and suffered exczema as well when she drank milk. She still gets exczema today when she drinks milk.
25 posted on 05/13/2010 2:49:14 PM PDT by murron (Proud Mom of a Marine Vet)
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To: wtd

lol Push the flight attendant button and tell them to do an emergency medical landing. Does not sound like fun, though.


26 posted on 05/13/2010 2:56:23 PM PDT by DBrow
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bttt


27 posted on 05/13/2010 3:01:48 PM PDT by DollyCali (Don't tell God how big your storm is...Tell the storm how big your God is!)
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My brother and I have both experienced food intolerances to a certain extent. His is more extensive than mine. For instance, I can eat strawberries without any kind of reaction. But if I eat a lot of strawberries, I’ll have a reaction. I call it an overdose. ;D My brother is more sensitive to citric acid...which is in quite a bit of foods. Sometimes he builds up a temporary intolerance to it. Strange.


28 posted on 05/13/2010 3:18:52 PM PDT by TNdandelion
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To: murron

Huge allover hives, throat swelling.


29 posted on 05/13/2010 5:12:54 PM PDT by Judith Anne (Holy Mary, Mother of God, please pray for us sinners now and at the hour of our death.)
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To: decimon

thanks decimon


30 posted on 05/14/2010 12:05:36 AM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: riri

“He said it was likely “exercise induced anaphylaxis” brought on by mold on the nuts.”

Well, maybe if you were um uh

NOPE not gonna go there.

Perhaps if you washed your uh um um uh

NOPE not gonna go there either.

On second thought, I’m not going to touch this one......


31 posted on 05/14/2010 12:14:02 AM PDT by Nik Naym (It's not my fault... I have compulsive smartass disorder.)
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To: Rockingham

Agreed. Intolerance and allergy are different. It’s an inexact science to diagnose and treat. A food elimination diet is the best place to start imo. It’s takes discipline to figure it out and stay away from the triggering foods but it makes a big difference.


32 posted on 05/14/2010 12:20:29 AM PDT by FTJM
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To: FTJM

Yup. The elimination diet works but is hard to stick to.


33 posted on 05/14/2010 12:32:06 AM PDT by Rockingham
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To: Rockingham

It can be very hard at times, and so easy to fall out of.


34 posted on 05/14/2010 12:35:45 AM PDT by FTJM
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To: decimon
Some likely get mixed up with adverse reactions to food or intolerance to some food additives. MSG is one good for it. I believe food additives are the culprit in a lot of food reactions. As a kid I could eat Bologna and I liked the taste. Even as a young adult same thing. If I eat a half a sandwich of bologna I'll be bent over double now in a matter of minutes and I sure doesn't taste like the bologna I grew up on. Neither do a lot of other processed meats which can do the same. Bread these days has so many additives it will last for weeks and taste like it's weeks old as well.
35 posted on 05/14/2010 12:55:42 AM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: decimon; All
The basic problem, here, is that certain physicians have been taught/decided that the word “allergy” can ONLY be used to describe one in which ImmunoglobinE is the major player.

It is a matter of semantics, NOT any sort of reality.There are several other immunoglobins, which cause various reactions. They are all “immune responses.” more particularly “Hypersensitivity Reactions.” If anyone wants to know more, this looks like a good start. (I haven't taken the time to read it thoroughly, yet. You could also Google “Hypersensitivity Reactions.”
http://pathmicro.med.sc.edu/ghaffar/hyper00.htm

DG

36 posted on 05/14/2010 9:10:22 AM PDT by DoorGunner ("Rom 11: until the fullness of the Gentiles has come in; 26 and so, all Israel will be saved")
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To: riri; decimon
I went to the doc the next day. He said it was likely “exercise induced anaphylaxis” brought on by mold on the nuts.

Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: Clinical manifestations, epidemiology, and diagnosis

Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn) is a disorder in which anaphylaxis occurs in association with physical exertion. There is a related condition called food-dependent, exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAn), in which symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating, and in most cases, only if a specific food is eaten in the pre-exercise period.

The clinical manifestations, theories of pathogenesis, evaluation, and diagnosis of EIAn and FDEIAn will be reviewed here. The management and prognosis of EIAn and FDEIAn, anaphylaxis caused solely by foods, and the diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis from any cause are discussed elsewhere. (See "Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: Management and prognosis" and "Food-induced anaphylaxis" and "Anaphylaxis: Rapid recognition and treatment".)

I believe it's a decent source, but you have to subscribe. References are linked.

Diagnosing and Managing Common Food Allergies

The second link is to the JAMA's abstract referenced by the NY Times.

37 posted on 05/14/2010 9:12:21 AM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: FTJM

I screen everything, but food manufacturers sometimes pull a fast one by adding back in gluten containing ingredients.


38 posted on 05/14/2010 5:54:20 PM PDT by Rockingham
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To: Rockingham

Gluten is in everything. Sprouted wheat seems to help.


39 posted on 05/14/2010 5:57:48 PM PDT by FTJM
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To: FTJM

I have wanted to try it, but life is too hectic now to attempt it.


40 posted on 05/14/2010 6:12:19 PM PDT by Rockingham
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To: decimon; neverdem; AdmSmith; Berosus; bigheadfred; Convert from ECUSA; dervish; ...

Thanks decimon and neverdem.


41 posted on 05/15/2010 10:08:17 AM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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