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Cheese found to improve the immune response of the elderly
Wiley-Blackwell ^ | May 13, 2010 | Unknown

Posted on 05/13/2010 2:28:25 PM PDT by decimon

Cheese acting as 'carrier' for probiotic bacteria can help to restore immune system

Scientists in Finland have discovered that cheese can help preserve and enhance the immune system of the elderly by acting as a carrier for probiotic bacteria. The research, published in FEMS Immunology & Medical Microbiology, reveals that daily consumption of probiotic cheese helps to tackle age-related changes in the immune system.

"The increase in the proportion of aged individuals in modern society makes finding innovative ways to thwart the deterioration of the immune system a priority," said lead author Dr Fandi Ibrahim from the University of Turku in Finland. "The intake of probiotic bacteria has been reported to enhance the immune response through other products and now we have discovered that cheese can be a carrier of the same bacteria."

Dr Ibrahim's team believe that the daily intake of probiotic cheese can tackle the age-related deterioration of the immune system known as immunosenescene. This deterioration means the body is unable to kill tumour cells and reduces the immune response to vaccinations and infections. Infectious diseases, chronic inflammation disorders and cancer are hallmarks of Immunosenescene.

To tackle immunosenescene the team targeted the gastrointestinal tract, which is the main entry for bacteria cells into the body through food and drink and is also the site where 70% of vital immunoglobulin cells are created.

The team asked volunteers aged between 72 and 103, all of which lived in the same care home, to eat one slice of either placebo or probiotic Gouda cheese with their breakfast for four weeks. Blood tests where then carried out to discover the effect of probiotic bacteria contained within the cheese on the immune system.

The results revealed a clear enhancement of natural and acquired immunity through the activation of NK blood cells and an increase in phagocytic activity.

"The aim of our study was to see if specific probiotic bacteria in cheese would have immune enhancing effects on healthy older individuals in a nursing home setting," concluded Ibrahim. "We have demonstrated that the regular intake of probiotic cheese can help to boost the immune system and that including it in a regular diet may help to improve an elderly person's immune response to external challenges."


TOPICS: Food; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: cheese; health

1 posted on 05/13/2010 2:28:25 PM PDT by decimon
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To: neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers

Ping.


2 posted on 05/13/2010 2:29:17 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

BTW, Cheez Whiz doesn’t count.


3 posted on 05/13/2010 2:30:22 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

It’s fine, as long as there are no moose in the neighborhood.


4 posted on 05/13/2010 2:31:41 PM PDT by Palladin (Regroup, Resist, Reload, Repeat!)
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To: decimon

Behold the Power of Cheese:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-5v9i04XsqU


5 posted on 05/13/2010 2:34:03 PM PDT by Diana in Wisconsin (Save the Earth. It's the only planet with Chocolate.)
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To: decimon

Consumers going off probiotic cheese
By Shane Starling, 17-Feb-2009

Probiotics have had a rapid rise to public prominence in North America since Danone launched probiotic drinkable and spoonable yogurts on the US market in 2005, but probiotic cheeses have won little favor, according to Euromonitor research.

Despite a spate of launches in 2007, Euromonitor found that fortified and functional cheeses accounted for less than one per cent of the $100bn global cheese market, with probiotic versions faring very poorly.

“Sadly, consumer response to these exciting launches has been lukewarm at best, and none have yet achieved mass-market success,” said Euromonitor analyst Ewa Hudson. “The main reason for probiotic cheese’s failure to take off is that, unlike yoghurt, it is not really regarded as a healthy food.”

She added: “It will never match the success of probiotic yoghurt, which is rapidly becoming somewhat of a new industry standard.”


6 posted on 05/13/2010 2:34:04 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: decimon
BTW, Cheez Whiz doesn’t count.

"Brie, Roquefort, Pol le Veq, Port Salut, Savoy Aire, Saint Paulin, Carrier de lest, Bres Bleu, Bruson?"

7 posted on 05/13/2010 2:36:23 PM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (An armed man is a citizen. An unarmed man is a subject.)
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To: decimon

Say “Cheese please”


8 posted on 05/13/2010 2:53:47 PM PDT by Tennessee Nana
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To: decimon

No wonder my house is full of old mice!


9 posted on 05/13/2010 2:57:17 PM PDT by bunkerhill7
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To: decimon

So.....don’t cut the cheese.


10 posted on 05/13/2010 3:00:48 PM PDT by teletech (Say NO to RINOS!)
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To: decimon

I suppose that Velveeta doesn’t either?

I take a probiotic capsule daily. Double it if I have to take an antibiotic.


11 posted on 05/13/2010 3:29:05 PM PDT by GailA (obamacare paid for by cuts & taxes on most vulnerable Veterans, retired Military, disabled & Seniors)
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

Heaven, I’m in Heaven!!!


12 posted on 05/13/2010 3:37:57 PM PDT by Gadsden1st
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

rofl......


13 posted on 05/13/2010 4:13:52 PM PDT by sunbird (not enough people say what they mean, and mean what they say.)
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To: decimon

thanks decimon


14 posted on 05/13/2010 11:21:35 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: decimon; Mother Abigail; EBH; vetvetdoug; Smokin' Joe; Global2010; Battle Axe; null and void; ...
micro/immuno ping

Probiotics and immunosenescence: cheese as a carrier.

15 posted on 05/13/2010 11:40:23 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: decimon

16 posted on 05/13/2010 11:45:00 PM PDT by null and void (We are now in day 476 of our national holiday from reality. - 0bama really isn't one of US.)
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To: decimon

bflr


17 posted on 05/13/2010 11:47:04 PM PDT by Captain Beyond (The Hammer of the gods! (Just a cool line from a Led Zep song))
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To: Palladin; CholeraJoe; AFPhys

The result is correct, of course, but the actual cause was missed.

Having eaten much more cheese than usual, the resulting gas cloud forced visitors around the average elderly participant in the study to a greater distance from the participant, hence less personal contact (and shorter average visit times), and thus less chance of infection from exposure.......


18 posted on 05/13/2010 11:51:16 PM PDT by Robert A. Cook, PE (I can only donate monthly, but socialists' ABBCNNBCBS continue to lie every day!)
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE

That is how garlic works - and it does a great job!

Protects from vampires, too.


19 posted on 05/14/2010 8:13:01 AM PDT by AFPhys ((Praying for our troops, our citizens, that the Bible and Freedom become basis of the US law again))
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To: decimon

Mooses are better. Beebers are more likely to be stuned.


20 posted on 05/14/2010 8:14:09 AM PDT by Lazamataz ("We beat the Soviet Union. Then we became them." -- Lazamataz, 2005)
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To: decimon

The article fails to describe which cheeses are probiotic and which are not.

How about aged cheddar, swiss, provolone?

Blue, feta,?


21 posted on 05/14/2010 11:01:36 AM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 . Ostracize Democrats. There can be no Democrat friends.)
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To: null and void

MMM — Wensleydale!


22 posted on 05/14/2010 11:05:55 AM PDT by mollynme (cogito, ergo freepum)
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To: bert
Blue, feta,?

I feel fine and don't call me feta. ;-)

Post #6 gives a hint. I think that the most popular US cheeses are lacking in the probiotic area.

23 posted on 05/14/2010 11:11:13 AM PDT by decimon
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To: Robert A. Cook, PE

I think you are on to something.


24 posted on 05/14/2010 2:48:25 PM PDT by Palladin (Regroup, Resist, Reload, Repeat!)
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To: Lazamataz
Mooses are better. Beebers are more likely to be stuned.

Uh, I think it might be meeses, maybe? Or is it meese? Goose, geese, therefore moose, meese? We have to get to the bottom of this! I'm series! This is the issue of the age! It's hugh!

25 posted on 05/14/2010 7:36:40 PM PDT by FreeKeys ("The fear of the zot is the beginning of all wisdom." Beebers 16:18)
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