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Hard Drives to reach 3TB in 2010?
Anandtech ^ | 5/10/2010 | Ian Cutress

Posted on 05/17/2010 7:28:12 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Sources close to Seagate roadmaps have leaked the potential of a 3TB SAS drive being released this year.

The quest for storage is almost a never ending saga.  Dubbed the Constellation-ES, the replacement for the Seagate Barracuda-ES, the drive is expected to arrive later this year with a 7200 RPM rotation speed, and a 6Gbit/s SAS interface.  A 1TB version of the 2.5" Barracuda-ES is also expected to arrive around the mid year point.

(Excerpt) Read more at anandtech.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: datastorage; hitech; storage; technology
prices continue to drop ...Fry's has a WD 1.5 Gig 7200 rpm on sale for < $100.

And so does Newegg:

Western Digital Caviar Green WD15EARS 1.5TB 64MB Cache SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive - $99.99 Free Shipping*

Word of warning....****

If you're using XP, you will need to do some additional work to make this drive perform correctly. This line of Western Digital drives is the first using their new "Advanced Format," which changes the sector size from 512B to 4KB. The more modern operating systems work fine with this, but Windows XP will not align the sectors correctly.

1 posted on 05/17/2010 7:28:12 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: ShadowAce

fyi


2 posted on 05/17/2010 7:28:37 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I haven’t got a new external HD in a year or so. This is amazing.


3 posted on 05/17/2010 7:31:02 AM PDT by rwfromkansas ("Carve your name on hearts, not marble." - C.H. Spurgeon)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
> The more modern operating systems work fine with this, but Windows XP will not align the sectors correctly.

There are reports of severe performance degradation in XP, due to misalignment, read/modify/write operations causing missed revolutions of the platter, etc.

I'm running Win7 on my hardware Windows boxes now, but if I were still running XP (other than VMs) I wouldn't use these >2GB drives for anything but archive storage.

4 posted on 05/17/2010 7:31:44 AM PDT by dayglored (Listen, strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government!)
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To: All
Fry's is having their 25th Anniversary sale this weekend and they have at the moment:

WESTERN DIGITAL 1.5TB SERIAL ATA/300 64MB BUFFER HARD DRIVE - WD15EARS

Price: $ 88.00 ***** not sure about the shipping charge.

5 posted on 05/17/2010 7:33:48 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

They are working on the firmware upgrades to deal with boot drives >2TB.

Imo Spend the extra cash and buy an SSD for your boot drive. It’s the best upgrade i’ve ever done on a machine. Literally boot to usable in 30 seconds. Everything is so Snappy! Srsly I’ve spent 500 dollars on a video card and the $230 I spent on the SSD improved overall system performance WAAAY more drastically.

Boot is an 80GB Intel x-25M. Then I have 2 640 gig WD cav blues. One is Data, the other is Backup. Win 7 AMD P2BE 3Ghz


6 posted on 05/17/2010 7:39:54 AM PDT by downwdims (It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless minority)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Heck, I remember when I got my first hard drive installed in an old 286 8Mhz system that I had bought back in the late 80’s. It did not come standard and had to be purchased separately and was about $600 extra. It held a whopping 40MB (of course that was more than enough for anything you needed back then).
7 posted on 05/17/2010 7:40:14 AM PDT by apillar
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

That’s great and all, but I’m pretty much done with platter drives, regardless of size. I’m far more interested in seeing the capacity of solid-state drives increase and the price come down to more consumer-friendly levels.


8 posted on 05/17/2010 7:42:05 AM PDT by kevkrom (De-fund Obamacare in 2011, repeal in 2013!)
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To: rwfromkansas
I was just reading about the Linux 2 6 34 kernel...:

Linux 2 6 34

******************************EXCERPT***************************

Linux 2.6.34 has been released.

Summary: This version adds two new filesystem, the distributed filesystem Ceph and LogFS, a filesystem for flash devices...

**************************snip**************************

1.1. Ceph filesystem

Linux-mag article: Ceph: The Distributed File System Creature from the Object Lagoon

IBM Developerworks article: Ceph: A Linux petabyte-scale distributed file system

LWN article: The Ceph filesystem

Ceph is a distributed network filesystem. It is built from the ground up to seamlessly and gracefully scale from gigabytes to petabytes and beyond. Scalability is considered in terms of workload as well as total storage. Ceph is designed to handle workloads in which tens thousands of clients or more simultaneously access the same file, or write to the same directory–usage scenarios that bring typical enterprise storage systems to their knees.

Some of the key features that make Ceph different from existing file systems:

Project web site: ceph.newdream.net

Code: (code)

********************************************************

So Linux is getting ready .........

9 posted on 05/17/2010 7:42:18 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I can fill anything they can throw at me!


10 posted on 05/17/2010 7:57:45 AM PDT by Jack Wilson
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To: Jack Wilson

Man....what with?


11 posted on 05/17/2010 8:11:00 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Not to worry. Microsoft will have a new Office Suite out in no time to sop up the space like biscuits sop up gravy.


12 posted on 05/17/2010 8:13:45 AM PDT by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Be careful about relying too much on those for backup. Their power supplies suck.
13 posted on 05/17/2010 8:14:51 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Man....what with?

*cough*pr0n*cough*

14 posted on 05/17/2010 8:15:40 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: martin_fierro

bttt


15 posted on 05/17/2010 8:15:55 AM PDT by ConservativeMan55
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Be careful about relying too much on those for backup. Their power supplies suck.

Correction: I was referring to the external drives.

(which work just fine when stripped out of the cheap external case and mounted intenally)

16 posted on 05/17/2010 8:17:56 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: dayglored

yeah, I hate having 2GB drives, too :)


17 posted on 05/17/2010 8:20:11 AM PDT by wizzardude
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To: martin_fierro

That’s what everybody uses external drives for....I thought.


18 posted on 05/17/2010 8:21:09 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: apillar

Yeah, back when I bought my first PC (386-25) I had an 80 MB drive and thought to myself “I’ll never fill this up.” LOL.


19 posted on 05/17/2010 8:23:58 AM PDT by Sudetenland (Slow to anger but terrible in vengence...such is the character of the American people.)
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To: kevkrom

Want This.

Dont want to pay more than $350 for this so I must wait. With the SATA 6Gb/s interface and up to 355MB/s read speeds it will allow me to stay alive longer and kill my friends better on Team Fortress2.

priorities!

20 posted on 05/17/2010 8:46:45 AM PDT by corkoman
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To: All
2TB Seagate Constellation ES in for review

Homepage:


21 posted on 05/17/2010 8:57:35 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: kevkrom
The SSD guys are hot on their tails....see this:

Samsung First With 20 nanometer-class NAND Chips

***************************EXCERPT********************************

Posted April 19th, 2010 by Brian

Samsung Electronics has just announced that they have started producing 20nm-class NAND chips for use in SD memory cards and embedded solutions.  The new process, improving upon a 30nm process, brings better performance and density for storage solutions.  A new 32Gb (gigabit) MLC NAND chip adds to Samsung's portfolio of storage solutions.

22 posted on 05/17/2010 9:02:33 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: corkoman

See #22.....


23 posted on 05/17/2010 9:04:00 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: martin_fierro; rwfromkansas; dayglored; downwdims; apillar; kevkrom; Jack Wilson; abb; ...
Everyone needs this for their car:

Toshiba MK2060GSC Launched - Highest Capacity Automotive-Grade Hard Drive

*********************************EXCERPT************************************

Posted April 15th, 2010 by Brian

Cars are getting more tech-savvy every day, and now Toshiba has launched the largest hard drive offering designed to deal with the storage needs and rigors of automotive usage.  The Toshiba MK2060GSC offers a 200GB capacity on a single platter with 4200 RPM speed and SATA interface. 

Toshiba MK2060GSC

While 200GB is nothing when it comes to "regular storage," the MK2060GSC doubles up on the highest capacity drive currently available. Toshiba also touts its quiet operation, shock resistance, reliability and the fact that it can handle altitude variations of -300 (984 feet) to 5,650 (18,537 feet) meters while operating and temps of -30 to 85°C. 

Toshiba also announced the MK1060GSC, a 100GB model of the hard drive. 

Toshiba pretty much owns this little slice of the hard drive market, shipping a worldwide total of 14 million automotive-grade hard drives to date. That's good for a 75% market share based on 2009 shipments. With cars increasingly offering entertainment and navigation systems there's a good chance Toshiba is handling the storage. 

Availability

Toshiba's MKxxGSC series will be available in the third quarter of 2010 for industrial distribution and OEMs. 

24 posted on 05/17/2010 9:10:55 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: dayglored
Was looking at specs:

Specifications for the WD Caviar Green (Advanced Format) SATA internal hard drives

*****************************SAW THIS**************************


25 posted on 05/17/2010 9:16:12 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Man....what with?

I'd love to have enough drive space to eventually keep all of my DVDs (and eventually Blu Ray discs), at least the main features, at full quality on a hard drive, so I can dispense with using physical media altogether except as a backup.

26 posted on 05/17/2010 9:16:47 AM PDT by kevkrom (De-fund Obamacare in 2011, repeal in 2013!)
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To: All
More :

Exploring Advanced Format Hard Drive Technology

27 posted on 05/17/2010 9:21:11 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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Better Link:

Exploring WD's Advanced Format HD Technology

*********************************EXCERPT*************************************

Friday, February 26, 2010 - by Joel Hruska in Storage

Western Digital recently began to ship a new series of Caviar hard drives that included the company's Advanced Format technology. The new Caviar Green models are nearly identical to their standard brethren, but offer double the cache (64MB instead of 32MB at 1-2TB) and have a different model number. A WD10EARS is an Advanced Format drive; a WD10-EADS is a 'normal' drive. WD isn't marketing Advanced Format much at the moment, but it's important to understand what the technology is and how it works, particularly if you're still running Windows XP.

Understanding Advanced Format


The new data label for Advanced Format drives. Pay attention.


Hard drive sizes are typically given in terms of total storage capacity, where 1 byte = 10 bits. This is sometimes further broken down by the number of platters and the size of each. The first 1TB drives, for example, used five 200GB platters; current-generation 1TB drives use two 500GB platters. These values, however, only refer to the accessible storage capacity, not the total size of the platter itself. This invisible (to the end-user) additional capacity is used to store positional information and for error correction code.

Advanced Format changes a hard drive's sector size from 512 bytes (the standard for the past three decades) to 4K. This allows the ECC data we referred to above to be stored more efficiently. When a 512 byte sector size is used, Sync/DAM and ECC information is stored as follows:


Old and busted...

Each one of those ECC blocks is 40 bits wide; a 4K block of data contains 320 bytes of ECC. Using Advanced Format's new 4096 sector size cuts the amount of ECC and Sync/DAM space significantly. According to WD, it needs just 100 bytes of ECC data per 4096 byte sector under the new scheme, a savings of 220 bytes.


New hotness.

Debunking the Myth of Additional Drive Space
We want to clear up some confusion regarding the near-term benefits of Advanced Format. In Western Digital's whitepaper on the
subject (PDF), the company states that it can "gain approximately 7-11% in disk space" by using Advanced Format. ECC accounts for 5.5 percent of this; the rest is presumably a mix of efficiency gains in other areas. This has been misinterpreted in a number of circles as meaning that an Advanced Format HDD offers more storage capacity than a normal one. It doesn't—or at least, it doesn't yet. A WD10EARS and a WD10EADS have exactly the same unformatted capacity and Windows reports both drives offer 931GB of storage space.

Western Digital isn't lying about the efficiency benefits of a 4K sector drive, but the company can use that space in a number of ways. Smaller platters are one option, larger storage capacity is another, and removing the innermost tracks of the platter is a third. This last contains an extra bonus—because read and write speeds are typically reported as an average, knocking off the slowest tracks would make the hard drive look faster in a benchmark without actually changing performance at all. For now, WD isn't claiming that Advanced Format delivers any particular advantage and AF drives aren't carrying much of a premium, if any.

The Windows XP Problem


Advanced Format drives emulate a 512 byte sector size, to keep backwards compatibility intact, by mapping eight logical 512 byte sectors to a single physical sector. Unfortunately, this creates a problem for Windows XP users. By default, Windows XP creates a primary disk partition at LBA (logical block address) 63, which is one block short of being evenly divisible by eight. As a result of this offset, data is written across both sides of the 4K physical sector boundary. Read speeds and sequential write speeds aren't as badly impacted by the offset, but the impact on small and random writes is murderous.

The good news is, Western Digital has already solved the problem. Those of you who want to use an AF drive in Windows XP can either install a hardware jumper (if you plan to use a single, simple partition) or run a software tool called
WDAlign. Either solution will restore the drive's full write performance, but WDAlign is what you'll need to use if you've created multiple partitions on a single disk. For our test, we compared the performance of a Caviar Black 1TB (32MB cache, 7200 RPM), and an Advanced Format Caviar Green 1TB (64MB cache, 5400RPM) in 32-bit Windows XP. The Caviar Green was tested both properly aligned and unaligned to highlight the impact of not using WDAlign or setting the requisite jumper.

Article Index:


28 posted on 05/17/2010 9:27:24 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Dropping this here just in case:

GPT fdisk Tutorial

************************************EXCERPT********************************************

GPT fdisk (consisting of the gdisk and sgdisk programs) is a text-mode partitioning tool for Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X, and Windows that works on Globally Unique Identifier (GUID) Partition Table (GPT) disks, rather than on the more common (through 2009) Master Boot Record (MBR) partition tables. If this sounds interesting to you, then read on (or skip straight to the "Obtaining GPT fdisk" link if you don't need the GPT pep talk). If you don't know what a GPT is, be sure to read the first section!

**********************************snip***************************

The emergency disks I know of that include GPT fdisk are:


29 posted on 05/17/2010 9:43:34 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: kevkrom
Seen these?:

The SANS DIGITAL at Newegg

30 posted on 05/17/2010 9:47:26 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

video


31 posted on 05/17/2010 9:58:11 AM PDT by Jack Wilson
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To: kevkrom
The stuff you can find....see this for a basic kit:

SANS DIGITAL HDDRACK5 5-Bay IDE / SATA Hard Drive Organizing Rack

Looks like you can plug in an old 20 pin power supply....

32 posted on 05/17/2010 9:59:36 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Jack Wilson

See links above for Gadgets...like #30.


33 posted on 05/17/2010 10:02:11 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach


Hard Drives to reach 3TB in 2010?

Egad, I remember NOT THAT MANY years ago when my tech-cousin and
I would marvel at the falling price of hard drive storage.

We just about freaked out when you could finally get a 1 GB drive
for $1000.


34 posted on 05/17/2010 11:13:48 AM PDT by VOA
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I really like the Caviar Green 1TB (64MB cache, 5400RPM) drives. They seem to run much, much cooler and the speed in a small raid 0 is phenomenal.

When SSD comes down again I plan on getting one to use for my boot drive.


35 posted on 05/17/2010 1:42:14 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Everyone needs valid ID except illegal aliens and the President - only in America)
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