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Penn Researchers Add Genetic Data to Archaeology and Linguistics to Get Picture of African Popu...
Univ of Penn ^ | May 26, 2010 | unattributed

Posted on 06/02/2010 5:50:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

genetic variation in Africa is structured geographically, and to a lesser extent, linguistically. The findings are consistent with the notion that populations in close geographic proximity that speak linguistically similar languages are more likely to exchange genes.

Furthermore, genetic variation in Africa appears consistent with the natural, geographic barriers that limit gene flow. In particular, there are geographic, and therefore genetic, distinctions between northern African and sub-Saharan African populations due to the vast desert that limited migration.

"Focusing on particular exceptions to these broad patterns will enable us to discern and fully appreciate the complex population histories that have contributed to extant patterns of genetic variation," said Tishkoff, the David and Lyn Silfen University Associate Professor. "Disentangling past population histories is a formidably complicated task that benefits from the synthesis of archaeological, linguistic and genetic data."

(Excerpt) Read more at upenn.edu ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: africa; dna; gigo; godsgravesglyphs; mtdna
Sarah Tishkoff site:freerepublic.com
Google

1 posted on 06/02/2010 5:50:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: SunkenCiv
Great Great Great Grendma Eve from which homo sapiens is descended lived in Africa about 200,000 years ago. Since the Mitochondrial DNA is found in the umbilical cord and is the DNA passed from mother to daughter we find that ALL Humanity is African whatevers. The DNA was harvested rom all ethnic groups on the planet and document the travels of early homp sapiens from Africa to Peru, Europe, China, etc.

Read more at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitochondrial_Eve.

2 posted on 06/02/2010 5:58:07 PM PDT by Young Werther ("Quae cum ita sunt" Since these things are so!)
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To: muawiyah; blam
Have they yet determined anything more about a Sa'ami genetic connection with the Berbers of northern Africa?

Thanks.

3 posted on 06/02/2010 6:06:21 PM PDT by hennie pennie (/)
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To: Pharmboy; martin_fierro; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 240B; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic · subscribe ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
This is a follow-on to Pharmboy's Dec 09 topic here: Link from yet another related topic: To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

·Dogpile · Archaeologica · LiveScience · Archaeology · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Discover · Nat Geographic · Texas AM Anthro News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo · Google ·
· The Archaeology Channel · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


4 posted on 06/02/2010 6:07:30 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: hennie pennie; blam

blam?

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2526496/posts?page=3#3


5 posted on 06/02/2010 6:13:28 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

6 posted on 06/02/2010 6:20:50 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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To: Young Werther

There’s no way to determine geographical origin from modern DNA distribution; the guesses of what constitutes “parsimoniousness” not surprisingly follows exactly the original assumptions of the Out-of-Africa / Replacement crowd.


7 posted on 06/02/2010 6:24:16 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: JoeProBono

Oooooh, that’s kinda cool.

http://www.google.com/images?q=salvador+dali+egg&um=1&ie=UTF-8&source=og&sa=N&hl=en&tab=wi


8 posted on 06/02/2010 6:25:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

9 posted on 06/02/2010 6:28:22 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet)
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related, from 2001, The Atlantic:
10 posted on 06/02/2010 6:37:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
"blam?"

What?

I don't know.

11 posted on 06/02/2010 7:31:33 PM PDT by blam
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To: hennie pennie
The real connection is simply that one of the groups ancestral to the Berbers, American Indians and the Sa'ami left the Western European refugia before the others ~ actually several thousand years earlier.

Some anthropologists have been arguing that the American Indian connection does not occur until the Sa'ami and the Yakuts linked up somewhere in the 7000BC to 8000BC period ~ which, of course, they did, but the Yakuts linked up with a number of groups at that time.

The Yakuts later on (6000BC to 5000BC made their way to North America and South America.

The problem here is that NONE of the South American Indians today show any sign of Sa'ami relationship. It's strictly North American.

It's pretty clear the Yakuts linkups in Central Asia and South Asia were not necessarily two-way. They'd figured out how to domesticate reindeer, so most likely these were trading expeditions where Yakuts traded reindeer to more primitive people in the far North or South. The Yakuts would have walked away with ermine, arctic fox and other valuable furs.

Let me explain how a smart guy hunts reindeer. First, he takes his family's "tame" reindeer ~ from that Yakuts breed ~ and teaches it to walk into a wild herd and attract a member back to his home where his master leaps out from behind a tree and slaughters the newcomer.

Or, the owner walks into the herd with his tame reindeer. While it provides protective color, the owner slips up beside a wild reindeer, puts his arm around it, and it freezes in place ready to be slaughtered.

There are a number of variations on the technique. BTW, I've picked this up watching internet videos of reindeer herders at work. The tame reindeer plays a major part in all this. More recently, of course, the Sa'ami and others have taken to trucking reindeer around to various feeding grounds. These are referred to as domesticated reindeer ~ but only that tame reindeer is actually domesticated. Older write-ups on Sa'ami hunting techniques refer frequently to the use of the tame reindeer.

No, how can you just walk up to a reindeer and grab it? I think part of it has to do with a problem the Sa'ami have with dogs. Unlike the Yakuts, not all Sa'ami get along with dogs ~ some do, some don't. I suspect they have some hormone in their systems that makes the reindeer think of them as "friendly". That would necessarily irritate the dogs.

12 posted on 06/02/2010 7:34:52 PM PDT by muawiyah ("Git Out The Way")
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To: SunkenCiv
Humans Migrated Out Of Africa, Then Some Went Back, Study Says


13 posted on 06/02/2010 7:35:23 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
Human Ancestors Went Out Of Africa And Then Came Back... [1998]
14 posted on 06/02/2010 7:37:04 PM PDT by blam
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To: muawiyah
"I think part of it has to do with a problem the Sa'ami have with dogs. "

Ahem, click on my name to see my dogs.

15 posted on 06/02/2010 7:40:33 PM PDT by blam
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To: blam
BTW, I get along great with Samoyads and these big Alaskan jobs where you take the puppy to the special vet to curl its tail. Big guys.

It's the ankle biters and bigger terriers that all want to carve holes in my legs.

16 posted on 06/02/2010 8:26:14 PM PDT by muawiyah ("Git Out The Way")
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To: SunkenCiv

This was reported in Scientific American. The migration of the Mitochondrial DNA was charted using the latest technology. Interestingly the more important aspect of this study was that there is only one race on this planet, the HUMAN race. Of course their are alien’s but that’s UFOunded!


17 posted on 06/03/2010 3:58:17 AM PDT by Young Werther ("Quae cum ita sunt" Since these things are so!)
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To: SunkenCiv
The findings are consistent with the notion that populations in close geographic proximity that speak linguistically similar languages are more likely to exchange genes.

Or that people are less likely to exchange genes with people who don't live in their proximity (think of the equipment of the barnacle) and who aren't of their ethnic/linguistic group.
18 posted on 06/03/2010 4:02:44 AM PDT by aruanan
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To: Young Werther

Unless the latest technology was a time machine, it is impossible to determine the geographical origin (or antiquity) of a genetic sequence.


19 posted on 06/03/2010 5:58:34 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: aruanan

Smaller family sizes and/or “open marriages” (infidelity, high rate of remarriage after accidental death, promiscuity etc etc) will always result in greater so-called diversity when compared with descendants of early riverine agricultural boom populations, when family sizes and infant mortality fell. :’)


20 posted on 06/03/2010 6:01:13 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: blam

Sa’ami, how we love ya, how we love ya, our dear old Sa’ami...


21 posted on 06/03/2010 6:43:15 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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