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Roman Shipwreck Discovered Near Aeolian Islands
ANSAmed ^ | July 2010 | unattributed

Posted on 07/02/2010 5:59:48 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

The wreck of a Roman ship from the first century AD which is still whole and has over 500 wide-mouthed amphorae onboard has been discovered to the south of the island of Panarea... [announced] by the Regional Councillor for Cultural Heritage, Gaetano Armao, and by the Superintendent, Sebastiano Tusa. ''From the first surveys,'' said Tusa, ''we can establish that it is a merchant shipping measuring around 25 metres, in perfect condition, which transported fruit and vegetables from Sicily to the markets in the north. The style of the amphorae is in fact typical of the 'workshops' of the island and of southern Italy. The merchant ship was identified with the use of a wire-controlled 'Rov' video camera. Now the campaign in the Aeolian islands will proceed with ''research carried out,'' explains Tusa, ''with particularly sophisticated robots which will allow us to better contextualise the wreck in time and space.'' The ship might not be the only one: on the seabed of Panarea there is believed to be another ship. ''Traces have been found,'' concluded Tusa, ''of a second wreck that has not yet been identified. Research will be carried out in this direction.'' The amphorae are the Dressel 21-22 type, datable to the first century AD, made in Lazio and used for the transport of Garum (a popular sauce in Roman times), fresh and dried fruit, as well as various types of cereals. The amphorae were found placed in a slightly different position to their original one on the ship. They are in fact lying on one side. This would indicate that the ship, sliding along the seabed, came to rest leaning on one side.

(Excerpt) Read more at ansamed.info ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: aeolianislands; amphorae; archaeology; ceramics; commerce; garum; godsgravesglyphs; italy; med; montetestaccio; pottery; romanempire; shipping; sicily; testaccio


Roman Shipwreck Discovered Near Aeolian Islands

1 posted on 07/02/2010 5:59:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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2 posted on 07/02/2010 6:01:44 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
They are of great benefit to maritime archaeologists, as amphorae in a shipwreck can often indicate the age of the wreck and geographic origin of the cargo. They are occasionally so well preserved that the original contents are still present, providing invaluable information on the eating habits and trading systems of the ancient Mediterranean peoples.

Amphorae were too cheap and plentiful to return to their origin-point and so, when empty, they were broken up at their destination. In Rome this happened in an area named Testaccio, close to Tiber, in such a way that the fragments, later wetted with Calcium hydroxide (Calce viva), remained to create a hill now named Monte Testaccio 45 meters tall and more than 1 km circumference.

Never knew this!

3 posted on 07/03/2010 6:04:54 AM PDT by texas booster (Join FreeRepublic's Folding@Home team (Team # 36120) Cure Alzheimer's!)
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To: SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy
GARUM

The most detailed description of garum is from the Geoponica (XX.46). The preparation involves adding a quantity of salt (two sextarii to one modius, 1:8, this is the only recipe to provide a ratio) to the entrails of small fish, such as mullets, sprats, or anchovies. The mixture then was allowed to ferment or macerate in the sun for several months, the liquamen drawn off and strained and used as a condiment or seasoning, the feculent remainder made into allec. (Frustratingly, the composition of garum begins with a description of how liquamen is made: garum is said to strain into the basket, but then the percolated liquid is also called liquamen .) A quicker means of preparation simply was to boil a fish in strong brine, add some origanum (oregano) and possibly some sapa , and strain until clear. (Galen says that oregano moderates the taste of an oily, watery fish such as the gray mullet, III.24.) The best garum , however, was made from the viscera of tuna, together with the blood, juices, and gills, salted and allowed to ferment for two months. This concoction was called haimation ("bloody"). Wine, herbs, and spices also could be added.


4 posted on 07/04/2010 10:54:50 AM PDT by kitchen (One battle rifle for each person, and a spare for each pair.)
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additional story, nice pic:
Roman Ships and Amphorae Found off Sardinia and Panarea
image search:
Google

5 posted on 07/05/2010 12:06:02 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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6 posted on 07/05/2010 12:08:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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word-for-word:

http://www.archaeologydaily.com/news/201007034496/More-on-Roman-Ships-and-Amphorae-Found-off-Sardinia-and-Panarea.html


7 posted on 07/05/2010 12:11:58 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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