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Book presents evidence of human connections across Bering Strait land bridge
Daily News-Miner ^ | 05 July 2010 | Mary Beth Smetzer

Posted on 07/05/2010 4:38:01 PM PDT by Palter

Research illuminating an ancient language connection between Asia and North America supports archeological and genetic evidence that a Bering Strait land bridge once connected North America with Asia, and the discovery is being endorsed by a growing list of scholars in the field of linguistics and other sciences.

The work of Western Washington University linguistics professor Edward Vajda with the isolated Ket people of Central Siberia is revealing more and more examples of an ancient language connection with the language family of Na-Dene, which includes Tlingit, Gwich’in, Dena’ina, Koyukon, Navajo, Carrier, Hupa, Apache and about 45 other languages.

In 2008, Vajda aired his hypothesis at a Dene-Yeniseian Symposium in Alaska organized by James Kari of the University of Alaska Native Language Center.

Vajda’s 67-page article, presented at the February 2008 symposium, is featured in “The Dene-Yeniseian Connection,” a just-released joint publication of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Department of Anthropology and ANLC.

The 369-page book includes an additional 17 other papers either presented at the conference or solicited by the book’s UAF editors: Kari, a professor emeritus of linguistics, and Ben Potter, an assistant professor of anthropology.

Extensive travel and research

Vajda, now director of the Center for East Asian Studies at WWU in Bellingham, was trained in Slavic languages but became interested in Ket in the late 1980s, when he came across a book in Russian about the near extinct language in Siberia.

His interest grew, and over the years he has engaged in extensive research, meeting Ket speakers twice in Germany, in southern Siberia and in Ket villages along the Yenisei River in central Siberia.

To reach the remote Ket area from Bellingham, Vajda traveled via six airplanes, three trains and a 4-1/2 hour helicopter ride that sometimes barely cleared the tops of the Siberian spruce forests.

Of the 1,200 Ket people, only about 100, all older than 55, still speak the language.

In 2004, Vajda wrote a small Ket language grammar and is gathering materials for a larger book.

New way to see prehistory

The importance of studying a disappearing language goes far beyond a personal linguistic interest, Vajda explained.

“It’s a new way to understand human pre-history before there were historians to write it down. Isolated languages like Ket have developed features that are very unusual and interesting, and they help us to understand the human mind and human language ability.”

“We linguists should not be the focus of attention here,” Vajda added. “What is important are the languages and especially the Native communities themselves.”

Vajda takes no credit for coming up with the Asian language connection.

“People developed the beginnings of these ideas even 300 years ago, and in 1923 someone made the specific claim I am arguing for. My work builds on vocabulary comparisons made by other linguists in the late 1990s as well.”

The strength of the new book, Vajda said, is that the editors brought together a lot of related international studies of connections with the Old and New World.

“This book goes beyond linguistics,” he said. “Language relatedness carries with it other non-linguistic ramifications, and they should be related too.”

Breathing life into history

In addition to linguists, the publication’s multiple authors include archeologists, anthropologists, and human geneticists who are all looking at the same problem and same hypothesis.

“I hope people will see this as a developing work and if this hypothesis is correct, there will be support and more evidence for it.”

“This is not the last word; it’s the beginning of a multi-disciplinary study of the Dene-Yeniseian link,” Vajda said.

Potter concurs.

“The papers in this volume raise fascinating questions. This has opened the floodgates to a whole new arena of integration of the different disciplines — folklore, archaeology, genetics and linguistics,” said the archaeologist. “We can work out the implications together.”

“The vast majority of Native peoples in western subarctic Canada and Alaska are Na-Dene and before Vajda’s work, there was no definitive link with any other group in the Old World,” he said.

Normally, the archeological record doesn’t speak, he explained. But with this deep language connection, an understanding of how prehistoric people viewed the spiritual world, how they categorized the natural world, and their customs might be revealed.

“Then we can breathe life into the ancestors of the Yeniseian and Na-Dene people,” Potter said. “There is the potential: that together, scholars from many disciplines can begin to reconstruct the lifeways of these people from stone tools, genetics, and now linguistics, and help understand the journey that brought them from Old World to the New.”


TOPICS: Books/Literature; History
KEYWORDS: alaska; beringstrait; godsgravesglyphs; languages; linguistics; newworld
Dené-Yeniseian languages[Wiki]


1 posted on 07/05/2010 4:38:07 PM PDT by Palter
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To: SunkenCiv

Jive and bridge, ping. For catalog.


2 posted on 07/05/2010 4:38:52 PM PDT by Palter (Kilroy was here.)
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To: Palter

Is that that long bridge to nowhere./s


3 posted on 07/05/2010 4:47:22 PM PDT by ntmxx (I am not so sure about this misdirection!)
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To: Palter; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1ofmanyfree; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; ...

· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic · subscribe ·

 
Gods
Graves
Glyphs
Thanks Palter!
Research illuminating an ancient language connection between Asia and North America supports archeological and genetic evidence that a Bering Strait land bridge once connected North America with Asia, and the discovery is being endorsed by a growing list of scholars in the field of linguistics and other sciences. The work of Western Washington University linguistics professor Edward Vajda with the isolated Ket people of Central Siberia is revealing more and more examples of an ancient language connection with the language family of Na-Dene, which includes Tlingit, Gwich'in, Dena'ina, Koyukon, Navajo, Carrier, Hupa, Apache and about 45 other languages.
Oh brother -- those are the least diverse of the North American tribal families, because they came over long after the "land bridge" was gone, and got here by boat. Can't believe this joker wasn't called on that crock.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach
 

·Dogpile · Archaeologica · Mirabilis.ca · LiveScience · Biblical Archaeology Society ·
· Discover · Nat Geographic · Texas AM Anthro News · Yahoo Anthro & Archaeo · Google ·
· Archaeology · The Archaeology Channel · Excerpt, or Link only? · cgk's list of ping lists ·


4 posted on 07/05/2010 5:01:06 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Palter

Did anyone ever doubt it?


5 posted on 07/05/2010 5:08:12 PM PDT by Brilliant
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To: Palter

With hard science opening such possibilities as DNA comparisons, a case can be made that the soft sciences are passe, other than as a make-work for for Liberal academics.


6 posted on 07/05/2010 5:15:34 PM PDT by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is essential to examine principles,)
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To: Palter
Not a lot known about the ket. On the other hand the link between the ket and other groups have been made through language elements and DNA.

One of the more interesting groups affiliated with them turn out to be the AZTEC.

The folks speaking languages with 5 tones in Mexico are probably pretty directly connected to the ancestors of the Ket ~ to wit, the Thai, and without further information it's not possible to tell if that means the Chinese affinity group that moved South into Thailand only 1600 years ago, or the earlier Chinese resident group itself.

7 posted on 07/05/2010 5:19:33 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: reaganaut; colorcountry; Elsie; greyfoxx39; Tennessee Nana

DNA Ping


8 posted on 07/05/2010 5:30:15 PM PDT by Utah Binger (Mount Carmel Utah, where Mr. Milquetoast lives with his "Persecution Complex")
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To: Palter

I’m no expert, and I’ll leave it to someone more informed than I to confirm it, but I’m given to understand that our Alaska Native language speakers can communicate with speakers of Apache, and vice-verse, each in their own respective native language.


9 posted on 07/05/2010 5:34:18 PM PDT by ArmyTeach ( ...speak the truth, right the wrong, follow the King)
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To: Palter
This old-fashioned Euro-centric map with the Greenwich meridian as the center of the Earth should be retired in favor of either the West Coast of the Americas or the Pacific Rim being in the center of the earth.

In addition to the plain fact that old Europe has receded in economic and cultural importance compared to the US and Asia, for a topic such as this, an Amero-centric map will allow us to see the subject matter more clearly.


10 posted on 07/05/2010 6:01:26 PM PDT by nwrep
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11 posted on 07/05/2010 6:09:54 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Palter
Vintage Skulls

"The oldest human remains found in the Americas were recently "discovered" in the storeroom of Mexico's National Museum of Anthropology. Found in central Mexico in 1959, the five skulls were radiocarbon dated by a team of researchers from the United Kingdom and Mexico and found to be 13,000 years old. They pre-date the Clovis culture by a couple thousand years, adding to the growing evidence against the Clovis-first model for the first peopling of the Americas."

Of additional significance is the shape of the skulls, which are described as long and narrow, very unlike those of modern Native Americans.

12 posted on 07/05/2010 8:22:54 PM PDT by blam
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· Afro-Asiatic · Algonkian-Mosan · Andean Equatorial · Aquitanian/Basque · Australian · Austric · Burushaski · Caucasian · Cossean (0) · Dravidian · Elamitic (0) · Etruscan · Ge-Pano-Carib · Hokan-Siouan · Indo-Hittite · Inuit-Aleut · Khoisan · Macro-Chibchan · Macro-Penutian · Nadene · Niger-Kordofanian · Nilo-Saharan · Oto-Manguean · Paleo-Asiatic · Papuan · Sino-Tibetan · Sumerian · Ural-Altaic · Van (0) · Sur-Family Groups · Unidentified Natural Languages ·

13 posted on 07/06/2010 1:53:20 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Palter; SunkenCiv; All

Interesting, the blank spot in the Northern Hemisphere coincides quite nicely with what would be the zone of maximum destruction from a boloid(s) strike around Lake Michigan and to the north of it 13,000 years ago. Time to post the Firestone book.


14 posted on 07/06/2010 3:01:08 PM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: muawiyah; SunkenCiv; All

The Aztecs came into the lake region where they settled about 200 to 300 years before the Spaniards found them. They apparently came down from the north of Mexico, and were of a very savage/primative tribe called the Chichimec. Perhaps they Chichimec were related to the very savage Apaches of southeastern US.

When I studied some Aztec (Nahuatl) in a linguistics class in Mexico City, we were not made aware that it was a 5 tone language. Were you referring to other languages in Mexico which might use 5 tones (such as Mayan, Tzotzil, Tarahumara, etc)? I thought that was characteristic of Chinese. Can you give me more details. Nahuatl does have some interesting characteristics: The tl consonants used together, infixes (in addition to prefixes and suffixes), the use of a 20s counting system (preserved to some extent in French), and one word for green and blue (perhaps something that would originate in a snowy land?).


15 posted on 07/06/2010 3:17:07 PM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: SunkenCiv; All

When I took linguistics in Mexico City, Nahuatl was referred to as a “Uto-Aztecan” language, referenceing the Ute indians in the US.


16 posted on 07/06/2010 3:23:08 PM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: gleeaikin
Let's put it this way, there's a real bias against preserving blue cones in the Far North!

That leads to a lot of confusion between blue and green. Red is the main thing ~ being able to see a campfire 3 times as far away as your average human is probably a major survival factor.

Now, regarding the 5 tone languages in Central Mexico, your basic fundamental Chinese structure has 8 tones. Through time they've merged several in most of the languages.

Still, tonal structures are not unique to Chinese ~ on the other hand, Chinese people seem to have a gene that produces a protein that improves the handling of "tone" in language. The "word" goes one way, and the "tone" goes another way, and the brain is able to process things faster.

17 posted on 07/06/2010 3:24:01 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: gleeaikin

I believe the Yaqui are the same as the Apache.


18 posted on 07/06/2010 3:25:26 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah; SunkenCiv; All

Are you saying that some far northern people have significantly fewer cones that see blue, this would certainly help other things stand out in the extreme blueness of frozen lands?

I would still like to know what Central Mexican languages have 5 tones, as we definitely were not told this when we studied Nahuatl. Could it have been the Tlaxcallans who were enemies of the Aztecs and contributed more than 100,000 warriors to Cortez’s fight since they wer tired of being eaten by the Aztecs? Incidentally, I was told in 1958 that there were a million Nahuatl speakers, half of whom spoke NO other language.


19 posted on 07/06/2010 3:31:29 PM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: Elsie; reaganaut; greyfoxx39; colorcountry; Tennessee Nana; SZonian; Zakeet; mrreaganaut; ...
Simon Southerton Ping
20 posted on 07/06/2010 3:38:02 PM PDT by Utah Binger (Mount Carmel Utah, where Mr. Milquetoast lives with his "Persecution Complex")
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To: gleeaikin

Heh heh... I may do that... I’m a little put out that Amazon keeps dinking with the graphic URL though.


21 posted on 07/06/2010 3:45:32 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: gleeaikin

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2547380/posts?page=13#13

Click on the “Nadene” link.


22 posted on 07/06/2010 3:46:38 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Utah Binger
Does that have anything to do with the Curelom that was just found in Alabama?

Fossils of mastodons -- forebears of the elephant -- previously have been found in the Mid-South, but Wednesday's discovery is a significant one, Young said. He believes the jawbone may have belonged to a close relative of the mastodon called a trilophodon, an animal which has never before been found in the Mid-South, he said.

The trilophodon had a long, pointed chin tipped with two short tusks, a short trunk and two larger tusks on the skull that curved down. The fossil found Wednesday belonged to an adult that Young estimates was 7 to 8 feet tall and 12 to 15 feet long and weighed between one and two tons.

Photobucket

Oh..I guess not.

23 posted on 07/06/2010 3:58:36 PM PDT by greyfoxx39 (If voters follow the democrat method of 2004 Obama will be named the worst president in history.)
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To: greyfoxx39; reaganaut

The history of the southwest from the Anasazi to the Navajo to the Hopi to the Apache is intriguing in the sense that the waves of the populace had interesting changes as certain migrations occurred. And when the Hopi nations appeared, the Anasazi disappeared.

Also the Alaskan languages are so much like languages here.
Some day maybe reaganaut will do a new study in this region debunking all the Mormon rhetoric.


24 posted on 07/06/2010 4:27:38 PM PDT by Utah Binger (Mount Carmel Utah, where Mr. Milquetoast lives with his "Persecution Complex")
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To: gleeaikin
There are several widely spoken languages in Mexico ~ Spanish is one, English is another (probably #2). Mexico supposedly recognizes 60 native languages, but only Nuatl has more than 1,000,000 native speakers.

Wiki has a piece that says: "Some of the native languages of North and South America are tonal, notably many of the Athabaskan languages of Alaska and the American Southwest (including Navajo), and especially the Oto-Manguean languages of Mexico. Among the Mayan languages, which are mostly non-tonal, Yucatec (with the largest number of speakers), Uspantek, and one dialect of Tzotzil have developed simple tone systems."

So what we are talking about in terms of tonal languages in Mexico is a group.

Given the discovery that the Chinese have a gene to produce a protein that helps the brain process tonal languages it's time for some DNA tests in Mexico!

25 posted on 07/06/2010 7:18:08 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: muawiyah; SunkenCiv; All

OK, I Googled Oto-Manguean languages. These have nothing to do with Aztec, which only showed up in Central Mexico 200 to 300 years before the Spaniards after traveling there from the north. Key civilizations of the O-M were the Zapotec and Mixtec whose ruins (which I have visited and photographed) are outside Oaxaca, which I would not consider Central Mexico, more like southern Mexico. These two cultures were far older than the Aztecs and from a different cultural antecedent. Another culture that I recognize in the O-M group is the Otomi, also southern, I think.


26 posted on 07/06/2010 7:54:12 PM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: gleeaikin

I believe anthropologists consider “Central Mexico” to be a bit south of the geographical central portion ~ a number of civilizations grew up there over several thousand years. No doubt the ancient Aztecs had a term for “El Norte” and meant what we would today call Northern Mexico and maybe San Diego county


27 posted on 07/06/2010 8:20:34 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: SunkenCiv

How does all this preclude colonization of at least NE Asia from America?


28 posted on 07/07/2010 12:38:03 PM PDT by ThanhPhero (di tray hoi den La Vang)
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To: ThanhPhero

Doesn’t, and thanks! It’s always amused and bemused me that the alleged land bridge must have been lousy with one-way signs.


29 posted on 07/07/2010 3:56:17 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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