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Animal Connection: New Hypothesis for Human Evolution and Human Nature
ScienceDaily ^ | July 20, 2010 | adapted from Penn State material written by Kevin Stacey

Posted on 07/23/2010 3:11:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

It's no secret to any dog-lover or cat-lover that humans have a special connection with animals.... paleoanthropologist Pat Shipman of Penn State University argues that this human-animal connection goes well beyond simple affection. Shipman proposes that the interdependency of ancestral humans with other animal species... played a crucial and beneficial role in human evolution over the last 2.6 million years...

"Having sharp tools transformed wimpy human ancestors into effective predators who left many cut marks on the fossilized bones of their prey," Shipman said. Becoming a predator also put our ancestors into direct competition with other carnivores for carcasses and prey. As Shipman explains, the human ancestors who learned to observe and understand the behavior of potential prey obtained more meat...

Over time, Shipman explains, the volume of information about animals increased... benefits of communicating this knowledge to others increased.. and communicating information through symbols. "Though we cannot discover the earliest use of language itself, we can learn something from the earliest prehistoric art with unambiguous content. Nearly all of these artworks depict animals. Other potentially vital topics -- edible plants, water, tools or weapons, or relationships among humans -- are rarely if ever shown,"...

Shipman concludes that detailed information about animals became so advantageous that our ancestors began to nurture wild animals -- a practice that led to the domestication of the dog about 32,000 years ago. She argues that, if insuring a steady supply of meat was the point of domesticating animals, as traditionally has been assumed, then dogs would be a very poor choice as an early domesticated species...

Shipman suggests, instead, that the primary impetus for domestication was to transform animals we had been observing intently for millennia into living tools during their peak years, then only later using their meat as food.

(Excerpt) Read more at sciencedaily.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: agriculture; animalhusbandry; cats; dogs; domestication; godsgravesglyphs
from a dead link:
Study acclaims dog's role in development of mankind
Tuesday 26th March 2002
An Australian study claims mankind couldn't have conquered the globe without the dog.

Researchers say the domestication of the wolf led to the hunting of bigger game and even the development of art.

They claim the dog was one of a few key forces which led to modern humans and therefore changed the world forever.

Dr Paul Tacon, of the Australian Museum in Sydney, and bio-archaeology consultant Dr Colin Pardoe, say fossil and DNA evidence both point to dog domestication over 100,000 years ago.

That is around the same time humans began marking their territory, something they may have learned from dogs, and which then led to symbolism and art.

Tacon and Pardoe say the human and dog partnership also led to new forms of bonding which let humans negotiate complex situations.

Their study is published in Nature Australia magazine and reported by the Australian Museum.
And yet, after 100,000 years, we still have to take them out so they can go to the bathroom.
1 posted on 07/23/2010 3:11:25 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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"It now seems that this same Magdalenian culture had already harnessed the horse by 12000 BC, some 8000 years before the date assigned to the domestication of the horse in the conventional model... we shall later find suggestions of the management of Barbary Sheep as early as 18000 BC in North Africa... grain may have been under cultivation as early as 14000 BC." - Mary Settegast
2 posted on 07/23/2010 3:12:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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the image is there, the hosting page (which is the link) is there, but I'm getting a Network Error right now. If you don't see the image, save the link and try it later.
In her Plato Prehistorian: 10,000 to 5000 B.C. Myth, Religion, Archaeology, Mary Settegast reproduces a table which shows four runic character sets; a is Upper Paleolithic (found among the cave paintings), b is Indus Valley script, c is Greek (western branch), and d is the Scandinavian runic alphabet.
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3 posted on 07/23/2010 3:14:59 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: blam; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 21twelve; 240B; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; 31R1O; ...

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4 posted on 07/23/2010 3:15:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: Eaker; TheMom

Remember the horse at the gun range.

Early man had a link with animals.


5 posted on 07/23/2010 3:15:41 PM PDT by humblegunner (Pablo is very wily)
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To: SunkenCiv
This otter bee good.


6 posted on 07/23/2010 3:17:32 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: SunkenCiv
"Shipman proposes that the interdependency of ancestral humans with other animal species... played a crucial and beneficial role in human evolution over the last 2.6 million years..."

Fallacy of petitio principii noted...

7 posted on 07/23/2010 3:18:18 PM PDT by GourmetDan (Eccl 10:2 - The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left.)
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The dog's eyes have it
by Katharine Arney
Tuesday, June 3, 2003
They can follow the human gaze or a pointing hand, figure out what it is we are looking at and seek out the target. Dogs have spent thousands of years living with humans so a Hungarian research team set out to investigate whether this cunning ability came from wolves, the genetic ancestors of today's dogs, or developed during domestication... The wolves could find the food when their handler either tapped the correct hiding place or pointed from a close distance... However, the real difference came when the researchers tested the dogs and wolves in a tricky situation. Food was hidden in a bin or on the end of a rope, and the animals got used to opening the bin or pulling the rope to get the bait. But when the bin was sealed shut, or the rope tied down, the main contrast between the two became clear. Dogs frequently looked back at their master while wolves just kept their heads down and tried to solve the problem. Wild wolves generally tend not to look at human faces, and not even careful hand-rearing of the wolves could change this behaviour.

8 posted on 07/23/2010 3:18:44 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

Of course there is a special relationship. man named them and was to tend them from the time of creation


9 posted on 07/23/2010 3:19:15 PM PDT by RnMomof7 (sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me)
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To: SunkenCiv

I think the first thing we did with dogs and cats was cut their little claws off to use as tools so we could build houses.

After we learned to make tools from other things, we quit cutting their paws off and they just ‘hung around the house’ from then on.


10 posted on 07/23/2010 3:20:13 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: SunkenCiv

What’s it say?

NO PETS ALLOWED IN BUILDING


11 posted on 07/23/2010 3:21:45 PM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: GourmetDan

http://philosophy.lander.edu/logic/circular.html


12 posted on 07/23/2010 3:24:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: RnMomof7

HEAR HEAR, VERY GOOD.


13 posted on 07/23/2010 3:25:05 PM PDT by raygunfan
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To: SunkenCiv

Exactly


14 posted on 07/23/2010 3:25:57 PM PDT by GourmetDan (Eccl 10:2 - The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left.)
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To: UCANSEE2

It’s probably a menu, although I kinda picture the prehistoric human diet as more of a buffet-style.


15 posted on 07/23/2010 3:28:15 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv

It takes great trust from a dog to stare you in your face. Normally dogs are affronted if a stranger looks them directly in their eyes. They consider it a challenge and an insulting one at that. That is undoubtedly what wolves think and why they don’t look back at their handler. If you want to get close to a strange dog, don’t stare him in the face; he becomes defensive and is likely to bite you.

Now when your Golden Retriever comes up, nudges you in the elbow, and stares adoringly into your eyes, you know that he completely trusts you. And he wants your dinner too.


16 posted on 07/23/2010 3:28:30 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic (Southeast Wisconsin)
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To: GourmetDan

I’m not going to waste much time on this, because what she’s saying isn’t what you said it was, I merely posted a link to a page describing and giving examples of it.


17 posted on 07/23/2010 3:33:33 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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To: SunkenCiv
Becoming a predator also put our ancestors into direct competition with other carnivores for carcasses

Funny. I don't recall the Expedition of Discovery members being set upon while they were having dinner.

ML/NJ

18 posted on 07/23/2010 3:37:04 PM PDT by ml/nj
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To: RnMomof7

I think the article is trying to distinguish between domesticated animals and those in the wild. “Naming” doesn’t do much, in that regard. It’s beyond just that.


19 posted on 07/23/2010 3:37:49 PM PDT by James C. Bennett
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To: SunkenCiv
I'm not going to waste a lot of time on this because you already confirmed the fallacy I identified by the information you snipped out.

Note your excerpt, "Over time, Shipman explains, the volume of information about animals increased... benefits of communicating this knowledge to others increased.. and communicating information through symbols."

Versus the actual article, "Over time, Shipman explains, the volume of information about animals increased, the evolutionary benefits of communicating this knowledge to others increased, and language evolved as an external means of handling and communicating information through symbols."

You simply snipped out the offending sections which clearly demonstrated the presence of the fallacy of petitio principii.

20 posted on 07/23/2010 3:46:04 PM PDT by GourmetDan (Eccl 10:2 - The heart of the wise inclines to the right, but the heart of the fool to the left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Welllll, this just changes everything, I mean the whole humanodog paradigm is completely turned on its head, the cosmic significance of these suggestions cannot be overemphasized, history will have to rewritten and whole new relationships established between dog and owners.

Or just someone grinding out a useless paper.I suspect the latter.

21 posted on 07/23/2010 4:32:42 PM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Why should they change? The Queen of England similarly has people at the ready to open doors for her.


22 posted on 07/23/2010 4:43:03 PM PDT by Rockingham
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To: SunkenCiv
"Having sharp tools transformed wimpy human ancestors into effective predators who left many cut marks on the fossilized bones of their prey," Shipman said. Becoming a predator also put our ancestors into direct competition with other carnivores for carcasses and prey. As Shipman explains, the human ancestors who learned to observe and understand the behavior of potential prey obtained more meat...

Geez...back in the '80s, Prof. Shipman was selling hard the notion that humans were scavengers and NOT predators based on a few overlapping cut marks on some fossilized bones. Gee, Pat, have the successful grant applications changed their theme?

23 posted on 07/23/2010 6:43:23 PM PDT by Pharmboy (The Stone Age did not end because they ran out of stones...)
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To: RnMomof7

*Applause!*


24 posted on 07/23/2010 8:43:21 PM PDT by Salamander (We are not who we are.)
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To: UCANSEE2
That reminds me of a "Tom & Jerry" comic book I saw when I was a kid. Jerry and the younger mouse want to go into a building but it has a sign reading NO PETS. Jerry says to the baby mouse, "That's OK--we're PESTS."
25 posted on 07/23/2010 9:31:05 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: SunkenCiv

A special relationship, indeed . . . .

26 posted on 07/26/2010 9:56:12 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

I haven’t checked the thread for Viking Kitties or ICanHasCheezeburger references. ;’)


27 posted on 07/26/2010 8:04:08 PM PDT by SunkenCiv ("Fools learn from experience. I prefer to learn from the experience of others." -- Otto von Bismarck)
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