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11 Tools to Get for Your Kids
Popular Mechanics ^ | December 15, 2008 | Mark Clement

Posted on 09/02/2010 8:16:26 AM PDT by Immerito

As a tyke I remember clamping a hunk of wood into my grandfather's bench vise and cutting blocks. Later, it was fixing and building bikes in my mom's garage. The bench vise and broken bikes led to my career as a building contractor, where I make my living using the tools I first picked up as a kid. I believe the lessons learned at the business end of a wrench are confidence, determination and success. That matters to me, because today, I'm the dad. While my boy is an infant--his tool life awaits--my daughter, 7, has already had some practice. She helped me "demolish" our dining room this November to begin its remodel. She whacked the plaster with my hammer, dust fell, a smile widened. Pride was born. All that from a hammer and a little time. Here, I have compiled 10 of the best tools for children to start their journey.

Safety Note: Safety is the top priority for tool use. Tool manufacturers offer no prescribed age restrictions on tool use nor does Popular Mechanics or the author. The parent--as with all things--is the ultimate arbiter of safety.

(Excerpt) Read more at popularmechanics.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Society
KEYWORDS: kids; tools
Anything else that you would add to this list?
1 posted on 09/02/2010 8:16:27 AM PDT by Immerito
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To: Immerito

Why do they need any tools when playing with a Wii, Xbox or Nintendo?


2 posted on 09/02/2010 8:22:24 AM PDT by caver (Obama: Home of the Whopper)
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To: Immerito
#12: Sawzall.

I am 41 and just got my very first one ever, and it is awesome. It is so fun that I literally walked my property and looked for things to cut up. A lot of tree limbs lost their lives that day!

3 posted on 09/02/2010 8:24:31 AM PDT by I Buried My Guns (Novare Res!)
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To: Immerito
Speed square and carpenter's pencil.


4 posted on 09/02/2010 8:26:00 AM PDT by smokingfrog (freerepublic.com - Thanks JimRob! The flags are back! - 8/17/2010.)
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To: Immerito

Excellent ideas.

Good list. We all need these basic tools.

Thank you for posting this article.

vise grips, wrenches, and screw drivers of various sizes, types are also basic. and necessary for most all projects.


5 posted on 09/02/2010 8:27:15 AM PDT by geologist (The only answer to the troubles of this life is Jesus. A decision we all must make.)
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To: Immerito

#12. Pocket knife
#13. Hatchet


6 posted on 09/02/2010 8:28:22 AM PDT by ConservativeWarrior (In last year's nests, there are no birds this year.)
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To: Immerito

Lots of bandages.


7 posted on 09/02/2010 8:28:53 AM PDT by tlb
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To: Immerito
I would put wrenches, screwdrivers, and pliers above the "work clothes (???)" and any cordless power tools. Best to learn with manual. Also, that Japanese saw is nice ... but not my first choice. Better a simple crosscut saw. IMHO.

Also, I'd suggest that while it's good for a child to have "his own" tools, his toolkit can be built up according to need ... using Dad's tools under Dad's supervision is where to start. Again, IMHO.

8 posted on 09/02/2010 8:29:31 AM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilization is Aborting, Buggering, and Contracepting itself out of existence.)
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To: Immerito

9 posted on 09/02/2010 8:34:01 AM PDT by greatdefender (If You Want Peace.....Prepare For War)
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To: ArrogantBustard

2nd the Sawzall. Those puppies are awesome!


10 posted on 09/02/2010 8:35:43 AM PDT by Radagast the Fool ("Mexico-Beirut with tacos!"--Dr. Zoidberg)
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To: Immerito
Cute list.

First of all, in my opinion, should be instruction on how to READ a tape measure and that it is made for the right hand.

Each inch on a tape measure has lines of varying lengths ... the 1/2" line is the longest .. the 1/4" lines are next, followed by eighths and maybe sixteenths being the shortest.

I really heard from a grown man, "8 feet 3 and a half and 1 little line inches"


I'm right handed so I usually use the tape measure in my left while I mark with the right ... this forces you to read the tape upsidedown, because the tape was engineered to be pulled with the right hand and marked with the left.


I would include a coping saw in the list.
Learning to cope is a wealth of finger/hand/wrist training that works out well in other tasks.


Prolly most important will be a good Boy Scout type whittlin' knife.

Jes' th' two o'ya, whittlin'

What's that?
An arrowhead
Yep .. fine one too

priceless.

11 posted on 09/02/2010 8:36:17 AM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: ConservativeWarrior
This one is a must!
12 posted on 09/02/2010 8:36:53 AM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: greatdefender

the shotgun ain’t bad, either!! :)

As far as work clothes, I use old stuff of mine that’s worn but still good-and I often stop by my church’s thrift store for used clothing.


13 posted on 09/02/2010 8:39:23 AM PDT by Radagast the Fool ("Mexico-Beirut with tacos!"--Dr. Zoidberg)
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To: Radagast the Fool
Sawzall??? For a small child?

Ummm ...

OK. You give your seven-year-old a Sawzall.

Me?

I'll give it to him when he's seven MONTHS old.

Why are you waiting so long?

14 posted on 09/02/2010 8:40:44 AM PDT by ArrogantBustard (Western Civilization is Aborting, Buggering, and Contracepting itself out of existence.)
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To: Immerito
Magnifying glass.

For cooking... err... *looking at* ants.

15 posted on 09/02/2010 8:41:14 AM PDT by Fido969 ("The hardest thing in the world to understand is income tax." - Albert Einstein)
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To: Immerito

I can think of about a million, but Vise Grips, Channellocks, and saw-horses come to mind. My dad was a superintendent for one of the largest construction companies in the world, and I spent a good deal of my youth on mega-construction sites. He knew his way around tools and passed some of that on to me. I worked as a farmhand as a kid, and later worked in the printing industry, so I got a lot of practice building and fixing things; as a home-owner those lessons have saved me tens of thousands of dollars. Every person - man and woman, boy and girl, should be able wire a switch, change a fixture, replace a faucet, frame a wall, build a table, sharpen tools, and use an electrical meter to check a circuit. I am stunned to know men my age (early 50s) who wouldn’t have a clue on how to do any of those things - if you know how, pass it along to someone who doesn’t; if you don’t, learn.


16 posted on 09/02/2010 8:55:45 AM PDT by stormer
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To: Immerito
When my daughter moved out to her own apartment, I gave her a cordless drill and some bits, and a small box of tools. As far as I recall, it contained: channel locks, pliers, and needle nose pliers, a set of wrenches and sockets, a hammer, a level, some carpenter's glue, GOOP and epoxy, electrical tape, 3-in 1 oil, WD40, a tape measure, a box cutter, a small cross cut saw, a set of C clamps, a set of screwdrivers, a set of precision screwdrivers, a picture hanging kit, a kit of washers, bolts and nuts, some tacks, brads, and nails, some sandpaper and steel wool, and a tube of silicon sealer and a tube of spackle. I figured if she couldn't use them to fix whatever, she'd have some friend nearby who could.
17 posted on 09/02/2010 9:35:05 AM PDT by PUGACHEV
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To: ArrogantBustard

LOL!!!
I know, a sawzall isn’t the best tool for a kid, but it’s a real nice tool to have!!!


18 posted on 09/02/2010 9:46:22 AM PDT by Radagast the Fool ("Mexico-Beirut with tacos!"--Dr. Zoidberg)
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To: Immerito

ISBN: 0143117467

19 posted on 09/02/2010 9:49:05 AM PDT by T-Bird45 (It feels like the seventies, and it shouldn't.)
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To: Immerito

20 posted on 09/02/2010 9:51:20 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: Radagast the Fool; Immerito
Pffft! Semi-handguns ...preferably of a high caliber...


21 posted on 09/02/2010 9:52:16 AM PDT by Daffynition ("Life Imitates Bacon, but Bacon does not imitate Life. Bacon IS life." ~paulycy)
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To: caver
Why do they need any tools when playing with a Wii, Xbox or Nintendo?

One, Wii is Nintendo. Two, some specialized tools come in handy for those if you want to get your kid into electronics.

22 posted on 09/02/2010 9:53:18 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat

“Wii is Nintendo.”

I’m proud to say that I don’t know the difference and don’t care.


23 posted on 09/02/2010 10:09:54 AM PDT by caver (Obama: Home of the Whopper)
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To: Immerito

In building anything, the more precise you are, the easier the job will go. Whenever you need check the square of most anything, always remember this rule. 3-4-5. Measure 3’ on from a corner. measure 4’ from the same corner on the adjoining line. Measure from the 3’ mark to the 4’ mark. If it is square, the measurement across will be 5’ exactly. multiples of the 3’,4’,5’ holds true; 6’,8’,10’, 30’,40’,50’. This works every time. One of life’s absolutes.


24 posted on 09/02/2010 10:32:50 AM PDT by yellowhorse (6 good horses, 3 good women)
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To: Immerito

Some basic knowledge is as vital as the tools you use. And I agree that it’s better to start with manual tools to learn the basics. My grandpa taught me and I don’t remember him owning any power tool. But I do remember his saw collection. And I remember “borrowing” one of his prized saws. 2 times; the first and last time all rolled into one time. Man was he a heck of a carpenter. He could plumb something without ever touching a level. I never proved him wrong either.


25 posted on 09/02/2010 10:42:14 AM PDT by yellowhorse (6 good horses, 3 good women)
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To: yellowhorse
While you are all in a discussion on this topic -
This is Boy Scouts 100th Anniversary.
They have brought back a few of the original merit badges from 1910. Take a look at the original requirements and consider the tools involved.

Requirements for the Carpentry merit badge:
Demonstrate the use of the rule, square, level, plumb-line, miter, chalk-line and bevel.
Demonstrate the proper way to drive, set, and clinch a nail, draw a spike with a claw-hammer, and to join two pieces of wood with screws.
Show correct use of the crosscut saw and of the ripsaw.
Show how to plane the edge, end and the broad surface of a board.
Demonstrate how to lay shingles.
Make a simple article of furniture for practical use in the home or on the home grounds, finished in a workmanlike manner, all work to be done without assistance.

For myself I have provided my daughters with additional tools. They have them on hand and are glad to let the guys use them when appropriate..

I maintain my own rental units and found a certain set of tools most useful. I pretty well just grab and go and get it done.

My tools are:
1. adjustable square w/built-in 45 and level bubble
2. tape measure
3. Channel locks/vise grip
4. Crescent wrench
5. electrical pliers
6. hammer
7. hand saw
8. 6in1 screwdriver
9. pry bar
10. Sawzall
11. li-ion 18v drill w/Ryobi 30+drill set
12. drywall punch saw
13. box-cutter knife
14. carpenter's pencil
15. small socket set with sockets and screwdriver tips
16. JBWeld, duct tape, masking tape, Teflon pipe wrap
17. small Surform jack plane
18. 3/4 chisel
19. Electrical meter
20. 5in1 window scraper/putty knife

With these a person is good to go for most repair items. Hope you find this interesting, helpful, and useful

26 posted on 09/02/2010 1:51:52 PM PDT by tbird-james
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To: caver

I think most parents here want to impart some sort of practical knowledge to their children.


27 posted on 09/02/2010 8:11:11 PM PDT by Immerito
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To: Immerito

Garage sales are great places to pick up tools for kids. Also, living out here in rural Wyoming, auctions are great places to pick up all sorts of tools.


28 posted on 09/02/2010 8:19:10 PM PDT by wyokostur
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