Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The American Rifleman in the Revolutionary War
The New American ^ | 03 Sep 2010 | Roger D. McGrath

Posted on 09/04/2010 5:07:20 PM PDT by Palter

“When the resolution of enslaving America was formed in Great Britain, the British Parliament was advised by an artful man, who was governor of Pennsylvania, to disarm the people; that it was the best and most effectual way to enslave them; but that they should not do it openly, but weaken them, and let them sink gradually.” — George Mason of Virginia, 1788

Our Founding Fathers were absolutely adamant about the right of the people to keep and bear arms. They were students of history and understood that from classical antiquity forward, an armed citizenry was essential to the preservation of freedom. Once disarmed, a people either submitted meekly to tyrants or fought in vain. The American Revolution strongly reinforced the historical perspective of the Founding Fathers: the armed American colonists defeated the mighty British Empire.


While the British had to train their troops quickly in the use of firearms, the American rebels could rely on men who had grown up using firearms as part and parcel of their daily lives. This was especially true on the frontier, where young boys were taught the use of the finest weapon of the era, the Kentucky rifle. By the time they were teenagers, these young men were crack shots whom the family depended upon to hunt game for food and to repel Indian attacks.

The Kentucky rifle — an expertly crafted tool that no frontier family was without — was actually made in Pennsylvania, not Kentucky; the towns of Lancaster and Reading were particularly important centers of production. First called the long rifle because of its long barrel, the firearm later became known as the Kentucky because many famous frontiersmen, including Daniel Boone, used it on their hunting trips into that state.

A Familiar Sight
The craftsmen who manufactured the rifle were the Pennsylvania Dutch — who are not Dutch but German. Dutch comes from Deutsch, meaning German. Historically in America, whenever anyone referred to the Dutchman down the road or the Dutch farmer across the creek, he meant German. The Germans had made the finest rifles in Europe, and the German immigrants to America, comprising about one-third of Pennsylvania's population, in turn produced the finest rifles in the colonies.

The Kentucky was a flintlock muzzle-loader, with a rifled barrel that ran to three or even four feet in length. The long barrel gave black powder more time to burn, increasing muzzle velocity; it also allowed for finer sighting, resulting in much greater accuracy at greater distances. Most of the rifles came in .40 or .45 caliber, which meant the bullet was heavy enough to smack a target with a wallop but not too heavy to carry long distances. In the hands of an accomplished marksman, the Kentucky could bring down a man or a deer at 100 or more yards and knock a squirrel out of a tree at 200 or more.

Shooting contests were regularly staged all along the colonial frontier — from New England to Georgia. At 70 paces, marksmen would “snuff the candle” or “drive the nail.” In snuffing-the-candle, the lead ball from the rifle would have to pass through the flame of a burning candle, blowing out the flame but striking neither the wick nor the candle. In driving-the-nail, the lead ball would have to strike the head of a nail and drive it further into a post.

The Kentucky had one problem, though: the percussion cap had not yet been invented, and the gun's powder charge was ignited through the flintlock mechanism. This involved several steps, each with great potential for difficulties. When a rifleman squeezed the trigger, the hammer (or cock) holding a piece of flint fell, striking steel on a small pan of powder outside the breech of the rifle and causing sparks to ignite the powder. The powder then burned through a keyhole, igniting the main powder charge. If everything went right, the expanding gases created by the burning powder propelled the bullet out the barrel.

Dampness and fouling of the powder charge in the pan, however, and hangfire and misfire, were constant problems. As a consequence, the Kentucky fired only about three-quarters or four-fifths of the time. For a flintlock to “flash in the pan” without firing was so common that the expression became an American colloquialism. Reloading usually took up to a minute, although the very best riflemen could accomplish the task in 30 seconds. Nonetheless, 30 seconds was a lifetime — and could mean the end of a rifleman’s life with Indian warriors or British troops or a bear coming at him.

Widow-Makers
Most American frontiersmen became deadeyes and could accomplish shooting feats such as snuffing-the-candle or driving-the-nail as a matter of course. The British marveled at the marksmanship of these riflemen during the Revolutionary War, calling them “widow-makers.” Captain Henry Beaufoy, a British veteran of several wars, remarked,

The Americans, during their war with this country, were in the habit of forming themselves into small bands of ten or twelve, who, accustomed to shooting in hunting parties, went out in a sort of predatory warfare, each carrying his ammunition and provisions and returning when they were exhausted. From the incessant attacks of these bodies, their opponents could never be prepared; as the first knowledge of a patrol in the neighbourhood was generally given by a volley of well-directed fire, that perhaps killed or wounded the greater part.

Beaufoy later noted, “It has been readily confessed … by old soldiers, that when they understood they were opposed by riflemen, they felt a degree of terror never inspired by general action, from the idea that a rifleman always singled out an individual, who was almost certain of being killed or wounded.”

Of all the American riflemen who fought in the Revolutionary War, the most celebrated was Timothy Murphy. It could be said that he was the man who won the war. He was born near Delaware Water Gap in Pennsylvania in 1751. His parents, Thomas and Mary, had only recently arrived in Pennsylvania from County Donegal, Ireland. Within a few years, the family moved to the very cutting edge of the frontier, where land was cheap but so too was life. Indian raids were frequent and could bring death or worse — capture and horrific tortures. Women and girls were not spared. Capture meant gang rape and then mutilation and death, or enslavement. An Irish family such as the Murphys had to adapt quickly or be annihilated. Such was the environment in which Timothy Murphy grew to manhood. By the time he was in his mid-teens, he already had a widespread reputation among both whites and Indians for extraordinary marksmanship and fierceness in battle.


In June 1775, Murphy and his brother John enlisted in Captain John Lowdon’s Company of Northumberland County Riflemen, a component of what was called the Pennsylvania Line. To qualify for service with the company, a rifleman had to fire at and repeatedly hit a seven-inch target at 250 yards, far more than that required for basic marksmanship qualification in any branch of the service today — using modern high-tech rifles. That kind of shooting would immediately get a marksman into a sniper school in the Army or Marines. Dressed in fringed buckskin and carrying knives and tomahawks as well as rifles, Lowdon’s Company of crack riflemen was soon ordered to Boston. The men made the more than 600-mile march in a little more than a month. They could not only shoot but route step.

A Rifleman’s Effect
Murphy fought in the Siege of Boston, then in the battles of Long Island and Westchester. By 1776, he was a sergeant in the 12th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Line and fought at Trenton, Princeton, and New Brunswick. During July 1777, he was transferred to Morgan’s Rifle Corps, led by the legendary Daniel Morgan. A giant of a man with “thick, broad shoulders and arms like tree trunks,” Morgan was born to Welsh immigrant parents in New Jersey (or Pennsylvania). He left home in his mid-teens and finished his growing up on the frontier. He served in the French and Indian War as a teamster, hauling supplies for the British army. For punching a British officer, Morgan suffered a hundred lashes, a punishment that might have killed an ordinary man. His back would be scarred for life. He later served in the war as a ranger in Virginia’s colonial militia, fighting Shawnee in the Ohio Valley. When the Revolution erupted, Morgan joined a rifle company and was immediately elected captain. He served in Benedict Arnold’s expedition to Canada and fought heroically, although he was eventually captured and imprisoned by the British for eight months. Upon his return to the American side in a prisoner exchange, he was promoted to colonel and given command of a special corps of frontier riflemen.

Colonel Morgan and his corps were ordered north to join the American forces opposing General John “Gentleman Johnny” Burgoyne and his force of nearly 10,000 British soldiers that had invaded upstate New York from Canada. It was Burgoyne’s intention to separate New York and the rest of the American colonies from New England.

The American and British armies first clashed on 19 September near Saratoga in the First Battle of Saratoga, or the Battle of Freeman’s Farm. American riflemen, including Timothy Murphy, wreaked havoc, especially on British artillery, picking off artillery officers and gunners by the twos and threes and putting most of the batteries out of the battle. Nonetheless, with volleys of musket fire and bayonet charges, the British eventually drove the Americans from the field of battle, although British losses were twice those suffered by the Americans. It was something of a Pyrrhic victory for the British. The battle could be called a draw. The forces met again on 7 October in the Second Battle of Saratoga, or the Battle of Bemis Heights. The conflict began about two in the afternoon when the British opened fire and attempted to advance on the Americans. Accurate rifle fire by the Americans, however, cut down the British by the dozens. Suddenly, though, a British column, led by Brigadier General Simon Fraser, seemed ready to flank the Americans. Major General Benedict Arnold galloped up to Colonel Morgan and declared that it was up to his corps of riflemen to thwart the British advance. Arnold then pointed to Fraser in the distance and said that the British general was worth an entire regiment.

Morgan called for Sergeant Timothy Murphy, his finest sharpshooter, and said, “That gallant officer is General Fraser. I admire him, but it is necessary that he should die. Do your duty.” Murphy climbed a tree that afforded him a good view of Fraser, mounted on a horse at a distance that was stated, depending on the source, to be either 300 or 500 yards. Even if the shorter distance is correct, it was still a distance that put Fraser, or so he thought, well beyond the range of even the greatly feared American riflemen. While Fraser rallied his troops, Murphy rested his rifle in a notch on a branch, reckoned the wind direction and velocity, the distance, and the number of feet his bullet would drop. Adjusting his aim accordingly, he fired. Fraser dropped to the ground. Mortally wounded, he would die the next day.


Francis Clerke, Burgoyne’s aide-de-camp, galloped onto the field to take command. Murphy fired again and Clerke fell from his saddle, dead. Panic began to spread through the British ranks. Two commanding officers had been killed from an impossible distance. The British line began moving backwards, and men began to break ranks. Seizing the advantage, the Americans attacked. The British troops, already demoralized and retreating, fought for a time, then broke and ran. Burgoyne himself almost fell. American sharpshooters put a bullet into his horse, another one through his coat, and a third through his hat. The battle became a rout. Nearly 500 British soldiers were killed and 700 wounded. Gentleman Johnny and six thousand others later surrendered. Only 90 Americans were killed and 240 wounded.

The great American victory at the Second Battle of Saratoga convinced the French that the American colonists could defeat the British and win independence — if aided by France. This was the moment that many in France had been waiting for, a chance to revenge the loss of their New World empire to Britain in the French and Indian War. If France had lost her vast territory in North America, she would now see to it, by aiding the American rebels, that Britain lost hers. Without the aid of France, it is highly unlikely that we could have won our independence. And without the marksmanship of American rifleman Timothy Murphy at the Second Battle of Saratoga, it is highly unlikely that we would have stopped the British flanking movement and won the battle.

More of Murphy’s Exploits
Murphy would continue fighting until the very end of the war. He spent the winter of 1777-78 with the Continental Army at Valley Forge and was one of those who survived the arctic temperatures and near-starvation of that winter camp. During the spring, he led small parties of riflemen in harassing attacks on British troops withdrawing from Philadelphia. Again his crack shots dropped British soldiers from great distances and spread panic through the ranks. In July, General Washington ordered Murphy and three companies of riflemen to the Mohawk Valley of New York to repel Indian attacks on frontier settlements. The attacks, aided and supported by the British, were particularly bloody, sparing neither women nor children. Murphy was one of those who tracked down and killed Christopher Service, a notorious Tory and British agent who helped arm and supply the Indians. Murphy also participated in the Sullivan Expedition in 1779, a response to the Cherry Valley and Wyoming Valley massacres, which included torture, rape, scalping, beheading, and dismemberment of American men, women, and children. The massacres were perpetrated by four of the six tribes of the Iroquois, who had sided with the British, thinking that Great Britain couldn’t possibly lose a war with the colonists and that they — the Iroquois — could raid American frontier settlements with impunity. For a time the Iroquois were right and delighted in their savage attacks.

Led by Major General John Sullivan, the son of Irish immigrants, a lawyer, a delegate to the Continental Congress, and the veteran of several Revolutionary battles, the expedition sallied forth in June with explicit orders from General Washington to completely eliminate the Iroquois menace forevermore. “The immediate objects are the total destruction and devastation of their settlements,” read Washington’s order, “and the capture of as many prisoners of every age and sex possible. It will be essential to ruin their crops now in the ground and prevent their planting more.... But you will not by any means listen to any overture of peace before the total ruinment of their settlements is effected. Our future security will be in their inability to injure us and in the terror with which the severity of the chastisement they receive will inspire them.”

Just getting his force of some 3,000 soldiers and 250 pack-horse teamsters to the Iroquois country was a logistical challenge for Sullivan, and it wasn’t until August that he really began the systematic destruction of the Indian villages and fields after building Fort Sullivan. The expedition fought several skirmishes but only one major engagement, the Battle of Newtown. The Indians, accustomed to numerical superiority, were awed by the size of Sullivan’s force and fled whenever they had advance warning. Riflemen figured prominently in every contact with the enemy, shooting them at distances that the Iroquois thought magical. By the middle of September, Sullivan had reduced 40 Iroquois villages to ashes and laid waste to their crops. Washington was disappointed that more Iroquois had not been killed, but their once-powerful confederacy had been shredded and they could never again mount anything but raids of limited scope and duration.


During October, Sullivan began marching his troops south to winter quarters in New Jersey. Timothy Murphy was not among them. He remained behind to lead riflemen in the 15th Regiment of the Albany County Militia. His aggressive patrolling earned him a reputation as “the terror of the Tories and Indians.”

In 1780, during a reconnaissance with a Captain Harper along the upper reaches of the Delaware River, Murphy and Harper were ambushed and taken captive by Indians. Knowing they had captured great warriors, the Indians kept them alive, intending to hand them over to the British for a reward. During the night, while the Indians slept, the two bound Americans freed each other and then killed all their captors but one, allowing the sole warrior to live so he could describe to other Indians the might of the American warriors.

Only weeks later, Murphy and some 200 militiamen were surrounded in Middle Fort in the Schoharie Valley of New York. Laying siege were more than 2,000 Indians and British, led by Colonel John Johnson. The situation seemed hopeless for the Americans and the fort’s commanding officer, Major Woolsey, reluctantly decided to surrender to Johnson. The British commander sent an emissary, carrying a white flag, to the fort to accept the surrender. But when the emissary approached the fort, Murphy, acting without authorization, sent a bullet whizzing just over the head of the British representative, who beat a hasty retreat. Johnson sent the emissary out a second time — and Murphy again fired. Again the emissary ran for cover. After the scenario was repeated a third time, Major Woolsey ordered Murphy arrested. Not one of Woolsey’s officers or men would obey the order. Few would have attempted to arrest Murphy in any circumstances, and in this case most sided with Murphy, understanding that surrendering would probably mean an Indian slaughter of all those in the fort, including women and children who had come in from outlying farms seeking protection. One of the women was Murphy’s wife, Peggy, who aided the men by molding bullets and loading rifles. She vowed that she would never surrender and would fashion a spear should the ammunition run out.

Johnson poured fire into the fort but the return fire from Murphy and the other American riflemen was so accurate that Johnson dared not attack. He eventually withdrew and marched north to Niagara, leaving burned farms and slaughtered families in his wake.

By 1781, Murphy was back with a company of the Pennsylvania Line, now 13 regiments strong and under the command of Brigadier General Anthony Wayne. Murphy fought in the Battle of Yorktown and was there to witness the British surrender.

Following the war, Murphy lived on his farm in the Schoharie Valley with Peggy. They eventually had nine children. Several years after Peggy died in 1807, Murphy married again, this time to Mary Robertson. They would have four children. Murphy, widely known for his exploits in the Revolutionary War, was a popular figure in the valley. By the time he died in 1818, he owned several farms and a grist mill.


In 1819, the state legislature of New York voted to erect a monument in his honor. For some reason nothing more was done at the time. In 1929, the state corrected the oversight and finally erected the monument. There to speak at the dedication was New York Governor Franklin Roosevelt. He said:

This country has been made by Timothy Murphys, the men in the ranks. Conditions here called for the qualities of the heart and head that Tim Murphy had in abundance. Our histories should tell us more of the men in the ranks, for it was to them, more than to the generals, that we were indebted for our military victories.

Governor Roosevelt was right, of course. Murphy was emblematic of the common man of the American colonies who outfought trained British troops. But Murphy represented more than that. He was the quintessential American rifleman. He was reared believing that liberty and independence were his birthright and that his firearm was the instrument that guaranteed those God-given freedoms.


TOPICS: History; Hobbies
KEYWORDS: appleseed; banglist; godsgravesglyphs; history; revolutionarywar; rifle; rifleman; rogerdmcgrath; rwva; tna

1 posted on 09/04/2010 5:07:22 PM PDT by Palter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Palter
I remember that Carl Furillo was called the “Reading Rifle” because of his great arm. That fits into the provided history...Thanks
2 posted on 09/04/2010 5:45:18 PM PDT by BatGuano (You don't think I'd go into combat with loose change in my pocket, do ya?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Palter
Where were the mudslimes in this important story?

The teleprompter reader tole us dat de mudslimes played an impotent role in the founding of dis nation.

3 posted on 09/04/2010 5:47:21 PM PDT by rawcatslyentist (Jeremiah 50:31 Behold, I am against you, O you most proud, said the Lord God of hosts.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Palter
Washington’s order,

“and the capture of as many prisoners of every age and sex possible. It will be essential to ruin their crops now in the ground and prevent their planting more.... But you will not by any means listen to any overture of peace before the total ruinment of their settlements is effected. Our future security will be in their inability to injure us and in the terror with which the severity of the chastisement they receive will inspire them.”

Leadership is what we lack today..

Our GIs never outfought
our Generals out thought at every turn.

W

4 posted on 09/04/2010 5:56:12 PM PDT by WLR (Remember 911 Remember 91 Iran delinda est.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Palter

I never knew. I wished they taught this in the schools.


5 posted on 09/04/2010 5:56:45 PM PDT by PhiloBedo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Pharmboy

69 caliber ping


6 posted on 09/04/2010 5:57:05 PM PDT by NonValueAdded ("Obama suffers from decision-deficit disorder." Oliver North 6/25/10)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PhiloBedo

7 posted on 09/04/2010 6:07:25 PM PDT by EternalVigilance (The Thirteenth Amendment outlawed slavery. The Sixteenth Amendment brought it back.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: rawcatslyentist

The Mudslimes contribution was to give us the Lyrics to the Marines Hymn.
In mentioning France’ contribution in the RW Spain also tried to help for the same reason. Cajuns and Texans also took part in the war. Galvez took his militia from Texas and joined with the Attackapas militia from LA, which was Spanish at the time, and fought in the battle of Mobile Bay, which the Rebels won. My ancestor in this action was 14 years old at the time.


8 posted on 09/04/2010 6:22:11 PM PDT by barb-tex (Nov. 2!(Election Day) Dia de los Muertas. ( Day of the Dead), Them or Us. Nov 5, Guy Falkes Day)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Palter

Thanks for the article. My ggggrandfather was recruited by Morgan from Virginia and served as a rifleman through the end of the war.


9 posted on 09/04/2010 6:37:05 PM PDT by Liberty Ship ("Lord, make me fast and accurate.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: NFHale; hiredhand; Squantos
But Murphy represented more than that. He was the quintessential American rifleman. He was reared believing that liberty and independence were his birthright and that his firearm was the instrument that guaranteed those God-given freedoms.

long but worth it...

10 posted on 09/04/2010 6:38:15 PM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PhiloBedo
"I never knew. I wished they taught this in the schools."

They taught it when I was in school.

11 posted on 09/04/2010 6:52:04 PM PDT by ronnyquest (There's a communist living in the White House! Now, what are you going to do about it?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: NonValueAdded

Thanks for the ping...this article has it right. The American Rifleman was always a factor, but extremely important at Saratoga. And Daniel Morgan was quite an individual...


12 posted on 09/04/2010 7:23:32 PM PDT by Pharmboy (What always made the state a hell has been that man tried to make it heaven-Hoelderlin)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Palter
The craftsmen who manufactured the rifle were the Pennsylvania Dutch — who are not Dutch but German. Dutch comes from Deutsch, meaning German. Historically in America, whenever anyone referred to the Dutchman down the road or the Dutch farmer across the creek, he meant German. The Germans had made the finest rifles in Europe, and the German immigrants to America, comprising about one-third of Pennsylvania's population, in turn produced the finest rifles in the colonies.

Actually, there is a complete and total absence of evidence to support this commonly made claim. To date, there are no studies into this subject (such as anthropologists conduct upon the matter of paleolithic spear point development) which conclude that the American long rifle is evolved from German practice. In fact, the whole body of evidence speaks loudly against the likelihood that the hunting arms of the colonial frontier were derived from Dutch/German forms. It is difficult to find two more nearly perfect polar opposite formal artifacts within the subject of tool-making than the short, fat "jaeger" and the long, slender "Kentucky" rifles. There exist no transitional forms which link the two, and where one might expect to find examples of such mean proportion there are only the common and prolific samples of preexisting French/British design which revisionists have yet to hijack.

Evidence aside, there are no reasoned arguments to logically support the claim of German ancestry beyond the rough train that, because some "Kentucky" rifles were made in Pennsylvania, and that because many German immigrants settled (at some time) in Pennsylvania, that this form of rifle was therefore of German derivation. This line of thought fails totally to accommodate the actual proliferation of the form beyond the geographic, or even temporal, domain of the influence. The weapon form in no way corresponds to the settlement pattern of Dutch/German immigration, and is found all along the colonial East over a period of time which excludes the likelihood (or even possibility) of such a causal influence. The American long arms tradition was already quite well developed and tending toward the "Kentucky" model well before there was any significant Germanic influence.

The worst of it is that the claim that the American long rifle is derived from a Germain tradition is also unsupported by any chain of scholarship such that anyone can locate any original attribution for the discovery of this knowledge. The train of citation never extends beyond the authority of some so-and-so who will finally pitch the ball back into the murky mist of "everyone else says so". The history of the claim does not extend back to the period itself and it seems to have only been within my own lifetime that people (almost never historians) have begun to assert this little 'factoid'.

Neither did contemporaries ever utter the words "Pennsylvania rifle" to express recognition of any discrete form. Kentucky was not on Pennsylvania's frontier. It was carved out of Virginia and, along with Tennessee and the Ohio, was almost wholly blazed by settlers from that state. Pennsylvania isn't even on the way. In fact, the exact histories of many surviving examples of the "Kentucky" rifle are known and often place their manufacture in either Virginia or Kentucky itself.

Americans already knew how to make rifles and those features which serve to distinguish them from the British norm serve to even further distance them from any suggestion of Germanic influence.

13 posted on 09/04/2010 7:49:16 PM PDT by Brass Lamp
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PhiloBedo

There is a book series that came out in the late 70’s, early eighties by an author named Allan W. Eckert. with all the papers, footnotes, diagrams possible, He wove what wasn’t written together, as a storyline history of the French and Indian Wars, and the Revolutionary War. Good books to read, if you can find them. The man was the same stock as Tom Clancy writes of things today.


14 posted on 09/04/2010 7:57:28 PM PDT by Prussianone
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Prussianone

This is for “Palter”, followed by the book list of that author:

The Pennsylvania Rifle (Lancaster County During the American Revolution) [Paperback]
Samuel E. Dyke

The Bedford County rifle and its makers [Unknown Binding]
Calvin Hetrick

The Longrifles of Western Pennsylvania: Allegheny and Westmoreland Counties [Hardcover]
Richard F. Rosenberger (Author),
Charles Kaufman (Author),
Bill Owen (Photographer)
Product Description
The American longrifle, also known as the Kentucky rifle, was the finest rifle in the world for over a century. As this illustrated book aims to show, the gunmakers of Western Pennsylvania were second to none in their skill and artistry. From the first settling of the land west of the Alleghenies, local gunsmiths produced the rifles that enabled the frontier family to survive in the wilderness. Richard F. Rosenberger and Charles Kaufmann write about the guns and gunsmiths of Allegheny and Westmoreland counties from the mid-18th century to about 1870, with an emphasis on the “golden age” - 1785-1815. They present a brief history of the longrifle, an introduction to its manufacture and use in Western Pennsylvania in the 18th and 19th centuries, biographies of all major gunmakers, and detailed descriptions of known guns. They include 58 longrifles and pistols, each one photographed in three views. Several are shown in full colour. Close-ups reveal the exceptionally fine detail on some of the rifles. The American longrifle evolved slowly from its European ancestor, beginning about 1725. In order to survive on the frontier, settlers required a weapon of greater accuracy, lighter weight, increased efficiency in the use of powder and ball, and longer range. Over time, these requirements stimulated the development of a new rifle, which became the finest firearm of its day. The longrifle may have been a necessity, but it was often a work of art as well, with a finely carved and inlaid stock, and an intricately designed patch box. This book should establish Western Pennsylvania as an important site in the manufacture of the American longrifle. It will be of interest to collectors and people interested in the history of the area.


Allan Eckert Book List

Allan Eckert is the master storyteller of our age. If you are interested in stories that read like adventure novels, yet are historically researched to be as accurate as possible, Eckert is the author.

My personal favorite is the story of Simon Kenton The Frontiersmen. If ever an amazing man’s story needed to be told, it was Kenton’s. Into the wilderness at age 16, he led such an incredible life you’ll swear it was fiction. Kenton was respected and feared by frontiersmen and indians alike. Captured by the Shawnee, almost burned at the stake, ran the gauntlet more times than recorded for any man and even saved Daniel Boone’s life with a feat of great courage and strength. These are just a couple of the many stories of the frontier. If you only read one Kentucky Frontier book, you’ve found it!

Each of the listings has reviews by readers and books can be ordered online through Amazon Books.

The Frontiersmen; Allan W. Eckert; Mass Market Paperback; $6.75; Descriptive information available.

Gateway to Empire; Allan W. Eckert; Mass Market Paperback; $6.75; Descriptive information available.

A Sorrow in Our Heart : The Life of Tecumseh; Allan W. Eckert; Mass Market Paperback; $6.75; Descriptive information available.

That Dark and Bloody River : Chronicles of the Ohio River Valley; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover; $25.16; Descriptive information available.

That Dark and Bloody River : Chronicles of the Ohio River Valley; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback; $11.65; Descriptive information available.

Twilight of Empire; Allan W. Eckert; Mass Market Paperback; $6.75; Descriptive information available.

Wilderness Empire; Allan W. Eckert; Mass Market Paperback; $6.75; Descriptive information available.

The Wilderness War (Narratives of America) Vol 4; Allan W. Eckert; Mass Market Paperback; $6.75; Descriptive information available.

Blue Jacket : War Chief of the Shawnees; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback; $8.80 (Back Ordered)

The Conquerors; Allan W. Eckert; Mass Market Paperback; $9.34 (Back Ordered); Descriptive information available.

Incident at Hawk’s Hill; Allan W. Eckert; Unknown Binding; $12.30 (Back Ordered); Descriptive information available.

Incident at Hawk’s Hill; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover; $19.00 (Back Ordered); Descriptive information available.

Opals; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Not Yet Published)

The Wading Birds of North America (North of Mexico); Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Publisher Out Of Stock)

Allan W. Eckert’s Tecumseh!; Allan W. Eckert, Timothy Truman (Illustrator); Paperback (Hard to Find)

Blue Jacket, War Chief of the Shawnees; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Conquerors; A Narrative,; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Court-Martial of Daniel Boone;; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Crossbreed; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Dark Green Tunnel; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Earth Treasures : The Northeastern Quadrant, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hempshire, New J Vol 1; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

Earth Treasures : The Southeastern Quadrant, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, an Vol 2; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

The Frontiersmen : A Narrative; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Gateway to Empire; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Great Auk; A. W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Great Auk; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

The Hab Theory : A Novel; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

In Search of a Whale; Allan W. Eckert; Library Binding (Hard to Find)

Incident at Hawk’s Hill; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Incident at Hawk’s Hill; Allan W. Eckert; Unknown Binding (Hard to Find)

Incident at Hawk’s Hill; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

Johnny Logan : Shawnee Spy : A Novel; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

King Snake; A.W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

King Snake; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

Northwestern Quadrant : Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Washington, and Wyoming) Vol 3; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

Savage Journey : A Novel; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Scarlet Mansion; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Scarlet Mansion; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

Song of the Wild; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

A Sorrow in Our Heart : The Life of Tecumseh; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Sorrow in Our Heart : The Life of Tecumseh/Limited Edition; Allan Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Southwestern Quadrant : Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, and Utah Vol 4; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

Tecumseh! a Play,; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

A Time of Terror; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Twilight of Empire; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Wading Birds of North America (North of Mexico); Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

The Wand; Allan Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Wild Season; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Wilderness Empire : A Narrative; Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)

Wilderness Empire No. 2; Allan W. Eckert; Paperback (Hard to Find)

The Wilderness War : A Narrative (His the Winning of America Series); Allan W. Eckert; Hardcover (Hard to Find)


15 posted on 09/04/2010 8:21:27 PM PDT by Prussianone
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Prussianone

Thank you. I will try to find the books.


16 posted on 09/04/2010 9:43:07 PM PDT by PhiloBedo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: GOP_Party_Animal

pinger


17 posted on 09/04/2010 9:43:59 PM PDT by Last Dakotan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3; hiredhand; Squantos; mkjessup; sickoflibs; DoughtyOne; stephenjohnbanker
"..It has been readily confessed … by old soldiers, that when they understood they were opposed by riflemen, they felt a degree of terror never inspired by general action, from the idea that a rifleman always singled out an individual, who was almost certain of being killed or wounded.”

THIS is my rifle; there are many like it, but THIS one is MINE...

Feel-good story of the day! GREAT article!!!

LFOD

18 posted on 09/05/2010 10:31:10 AM PDT by NFHale (The Second Amendment - By Any Means Necessary.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Palter

I’d never heard this particular story until now. It will soon be repeated often. Thanks!!!


19 posted on 09/05/2010 10:53:10 AM PDT by WVNight (We havn't played Cowboys and Muslims yet....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: NFHale
commies and tyrants are evil, NOT stoopit...

they know full well that the 'resistance' in every oppressed country has been a brutal foe that, even when unarmed/poorly armed were a hindrance and threat to their individual survival...

now lets just factor in 1-9 million heavily armed and highly motivated and pissed off citizens...

i hope they have regular nightmares often...

20 posted on 09/05/2010 11:45:00 AM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3
regular...terrifying...
21 posted on 09/05/2010 11:46:40 AM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Palter

Bookmark for my 8th grade American History class.


22 posted on 09/05/2010 12:01:53 PM PDT by SCalGal (Friends don't let friends donate to H$U$ or PETA.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ronnyquest

Not in mine, and that’s getting to be quite a while ago.


23 posted on 09/05/2010 12:18:29 PM PDT by cycjec
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3
now lets just factor in 1-9 million heavily armed and highly motivated and pissed off citizens...
24 posted on 09/05/2010 2:11:16 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: OneWingedShark; NFHale; hiredhand; Squantos
ping fer the youtube...

Shark Sir "Thank You" for your service...and the vid...

"In GOD We Trust"...

been meaning to tell you that yer tag is most excellent as well...

25 posted on 09/05/2010 6:20:46 PM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: cycjec

Well, I grew up in a small town in southern Missouri. Admittedly, that’s been a few decades, but I vividly remember some of the lessons about American heroes and the place they carved for themselves in history. The American “history” being taught to current students dishonors those brave men and women who carved a nation out of a savage continent.


26 posted on 09/05/2010 7:00:48 PM PDT by ronnyquest (There's a communist living in the White House! Now, what are you going to do about it?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3

> Shark Sir “Thank You” for your service...and the vid...

You’re quite welcome.

> “In GOD We Trust”...

Indeed; though I disagree with the non-violence-at-any-cost philosophy that some think that should manifest as [one of the issues I disagree with Glenn Beck on]. If we look at the book of Ester we see that yes God *did* provide a way for His people to survive that was legal even in the sight of the government (despite that government already having issued a general death-warrant for *ALL* those people); it was not a “stay at home” solution, it was not a “passive resistance” solution, it was a VIOLENT solution: the Jews were legally authorized to band together into groups [for the defense of themselves and their kin] and KILL those who would do them harm.

We Citizens, likewise, have a similar legal authorization to defend ourselves against those who would do us harm: the Declaration of Independence. And technically speaking, members of the armed forces (possibly past, and certainly present) are bound by oath to THE CONSTITUTION, not any person, or group, branch of government, nor even the WHOLE INSTITUTION of government and so it could be argued that they have the legal OBLIGATION to do violence to whatever member of governance was to exercise his authority/power against that Constitution.

>been meaning to tell you that yer tag is most excellent as well...

Thank you. I notice that a lot of people in Religion are heavy on the “mercy” side of things, but the command is to DO Justice and LOVE Mercy. The reason, it seems, is that Mercy cannot exist without Justice. Consider, for a moment, the scenario of a foster family who takes a kid in (and these kids can be SERIOUSLY screwed up) and decides when he acts inappropriately to ignore it because “it’s the understanding/kind thing” & “Love covers a multitude of sins” and so extend ‘mercy’ without *doing* the Justice part of informing him a) that he was in the wrong, and b) why he was in the wrong. Say this continues on and on until some day the kid “does it one too many times” or something particularly egregious and the foster parents, who can no longer act in their usual ‘merciful’ manner, blow up at the kid. Granted that the kid may deserve EVERY ounce of anger and condemnation, but how is he supposed to know what is acceptable in the family if nobody is to teach him?

Thus, I believe it to be shown that ‘mercy” without Justice is not Mercy, but rather injustice.


27 posted on 09/05/2010 7:06:49 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: OneWingedShark
heavy on the “mercy” side of things, but the command is to DO Justice and LOVE Mercy.

from my checkered past, and only really scratching the theological surface so far, I must agree that meek and weak shouldnt be synonyms...

Luke 22:36 is THE single verse that caught my attention, after 30+ yrs of indifference to Scripture...i used it fer a tag for a loooong time...

with the Lord on our side,'walk softly, and carry a BIG stick' takes on a whole new meaning...

the story as told by Luke, speaks of preparing to venture into a cold 'world' of hate...I know that the Lord Jesus was well aware that many of them were goiing to be martyrs, in a 'civil disobedience' source of resistance...

and that many would rise with arms too [Peter surely didnt surprise God with his sword in the garden]...

different parts of the body have different roles to play in the Will of god...all to His Glory...

These commie tools are in fer a rude awakening...

28 posted on 09/05/2010 7:20:41 PM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3
DOH...Sorry Lord...GOD...not 'g'od in the last post...
29 posted on 09/05/2010 7:23:29 PM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: OneWingedShark
BTW...pastor is working thru Ephesians, and was drillin home today on 6:1-4...

'discipline' is mercy when the punishment is just...a lil sting of correction will possibly curtail a lifetime/eternity of 'death'...

30 posted on 09/05/2010 7:26:23 PM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3

>BTW...pastor is working thru Ephesians, and was drillin home today on 6:1-4...
>
>’discipline’ is mercy when the punishment is just...a lil sting of correction will possibly curtail a lifetime/eternity of ‘death’...

*nod, nod* far better a little pain and learning now than punishment FOREVER.


31 posted on 09/05/2010 7:37:47 PM PDT by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Palter

Bump & bookmark


32 posted on 09/06/2010 8:28:23 AM PDT by EdReform (Oath Keepers - Guardians of the Republic - Honor your oath - Join us: www.oathkeepers.org)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All
Modern Rifleman training:

Revolutionary War Veterans Association

33 posted on 09/06/2010 8:40:11 AM PDT by EdReform (Oath Keepers - Guardians of the Republic - Honor your oath - Join us: www.oathkeepers.org)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Prussianone
"Allan Eckert is the master storyteller of our age... My personal favorite is the story of Simon Kenton The Frontiersmen."

The Frontiersmen was great. So was That Dark and Bloody River. When you read Eckert's books you begin to understand how "up close and personal" the fighting was in the east between the indians and the settlers.

34 posted on 09/06/2010 8:45:06 AM PDT by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3; NFHale

” now lets just factor in 1-9 million heavily armed and highly motivated and pissed off citizens...”

More like 10-12 million.


35 posted on 09/06/2010 11:40:31 AM PDT by stephenjohnbanker (((.Go troops! " Vote out RINOS. They screw you EVERY time" Jim Robinson)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: stephenjohnbanker

10-12 would be great too...but the logistical nightmare of even 1,000,000 has to twist some commie panties...


36 posted on 09/06/2010 12:39:15 PM PDT by Gilbo_3 (Gov is not reason; not eloquent; its force.Like fire,a dangerous servant & master. George Washington)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Gilbo_3

“..i hope they have regular nightmares often...”

I’m Proud to be one tiny part of those nightmares, brother!


37 posted on 09/06/2010 1:00:14 PM PDT by NFHale (The Second Amendment - By Any Means Necessary.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: ronnyquest

I still teach it in school.


38 posted on 09/06/2010 1:16:25 PM PDT by GenXteacher (He that hath no stomach for this fight, let him depart!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: stephenjohnbanker

“..heavily armed and highly motivated and pissed off citizens..”

WHY do I get the immediate image of that old black-and-white newsreel footage of the 28th Pennsylvania Infantry Division (NG) marching down the Cmaps Elysee’ in 1944 Paris at those words????


39 posted on 09/06/2010 1:30:10 PM PDT by NFHale (The Second Amendment - By Any Means Necessary.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: Palter

Bump


40 posted on 09/06/2010 2:17:41 PM PDT by BulletBobCo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


· GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother, and Ernest_at_the_Beach ·
· join list or digest · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post a topic · subscribe ·

 
 Antiquity Journal
 & archive
 Archaeologica
 Archaeology
 Archaeology Channel
 BAR
 Bronze Age Forum
 Discover
 Dogpile
 Eurekalert
 Google
 LiveScience
 Mirabilis.ca
 Nat Geographic
 PhysOrg
 Science Daily
 Science News
 Texas AM
 Yahoo
 Excerpt, or Link only?
 


Thanks Pharmboy and Palter.

Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
 

· History topic · history keyword · archaeology keyword · paleontology keyword ·
· Science topic · science keyword · Books/Literature topic · pages keyword ·


41 posted on 09/06/2010 3:18:29 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Democratic Underground... matters are worse, as their latest fund drive has come up short...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson