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I have used Singapore Math with my two boys and recommend it. I don't understand why the NYT describes it as slow-moving but welcome publicity for a good math curriculum.

I've read that Everyday Math has driven many parents to homeschooling.

1 posted on 10/05/2010 5:20:57 AM PDT by reaganaut1
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To: reaganaut1

Everyday Math is ridiculous.

OUr daughter’s school used Singapore Math and Saxon Math. I would not recomment Saxon Math since the pace is SLLLOOOOWWWWWWW. I would highly recommend Singapore Math. Singapore Math is very good and not a “fad”. Allot of mental math is done in Singapore Math.


2 posted on 10/05/2010 5:25:17 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: reaganaut1
For decades, efforts to improve math skills have driven schools to embrace one math program after another, abandoning a program when it does not work and moving on to something purportedly better.

So with all these program changes, why do our schools suck more and more each year? In all of this, there is but one common denominator - teachers unions and school boards hell-bent and determined to level the playing field by reducing it to the lowest common denominator.

Mathematical achievement is to be discouraged at all cost.

3 posted on 10/05/2010 5:25:26 AM PDT by Hoodat ( .For the weapons of our warfare are mighty in God for pulling down strongholds.)
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To: reaganaut1
I went through the new math in 6th through 8th grades and found it quite good.

Mathematics are in many ways a language and a better understanding of how it works and was developed is beneficial to those who are heavy users later in life. Learning Base 16 (or eight) would have been better than the Base 7 we used though.

4 posted on 10/05/2010 5:27:04 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: reaganaut1
...

“The slower pace is a cornerstone of the district’s new approach to teaching math, which is based on the national math system of Singapore and aims to emulate that country’s success by promoting a deeper understanding of numbers and math concepts. Students in Singapore have repeatedly ranked at or near the top on international math exams since the mid-1990s. “

Sinapore Math is anything but SLOW. It moves at a fast clip and does an excellent job with critical thinking.

...

“Mr. Jackson said that students moved through a three-step learning process: concrete, pictorial, abstract. American math programs, he said, typically skip the middle step and lose students when making the jump from concrete (chips) to abstract (questions). “

Yes, there is more “pictorial” and YES, the ABSTRACT is missing with math programs like Everyday Math. I can't emphasize enough that Everyday Math is another DUMBED DOWN MATH PROGRAM researched to death by LIBERAL ELITES with the purpose of making math HARD TO UNDERSTAND. It doesn't fully explain what they are doing so kids are frustrated and confused. Even public school math teachers don't like it.

...

“Today it can be found in neighborhood schools like P.S. 132, which serves mostly poor students, as well as elite schools, including Hunter College Elementary School, a public school for gifted children in Manhattan, and the Sidwell Friends School in Washington, a private school attended by President Obama’s daughters.”

Yes, it is a good math program. Notice how the POORER districts get the BETTER MATH PROGRAMS. This is NOT an accident. This is another way of LEVELING the educational playing field.

My daughter received Singapore Math training from a private school as well as traditional math. This is why I can speak about Singapore Math.

5 posted on 10/05/2010 5:33:59 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: reaganaut1

We use Singapore Math (we homeschool).

My daughter has used it since Kindergarten, and is currently in 5th grade, last year she scored 96th percentile on the math section of her required standardized testing, so it must be a good “fad”.


6 posted on 10/05/2010 5:35:17 AM PDT by Cailleach
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To: reaganaut1

We use it, too, along with Kumon, Math Extensions, and IXL math (the best tool I have for measuring)

I guess the “slow moving” refers to the repetitive exercises in the workbooks. Too bad, learning math requires repetition!


10 posted on 10/05/2010 5:41:55 AM PDT by silverleaf (The lesser of two evils is still evil.)
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To: reaganaut1

I used Singapore with a student a few years ago. He had been sailing along in math (in 4th), but was hopelessly confused in 5th as they introduced Singapore. Teacher said — “Do not use this without the teachers’ manual. You will not be able to teach it.” I didn’t bother, but I did not like it at all. For many reasons. I homeschooled my own son, so have some experience with a variety of programs; I consider Singapore a fad. Where oh where is the basic, old-fashioned math?


13 posted on 10/05/2010 6:38:09 AM PDT by bboop (Stealth Tutor)
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To: reaganaut1

“New math,
New-hoo-hoo-math;
It wont’ do you any good
To review-hoo-hoo math.
It’s so simple,
So very simple,
That only a child can do it!”

—Tom Lehrer


19 posted on 10/05/2010 7:26:57 AM PDT by Erasmus (Personal goal: Have a bigger carbon footprint than Tony Robbins.)
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To: reaganaut1

Everyday Math is part of Reform Math, which is a cousin of New Math, and it’s all junk, or so I suspect.

Anyway, here are the four names I see praised by homeschoolers: Saxon, Singapore, Math Mammoth, and MathUSee.

I’ve asked two of these people, why don’t you create something for public schools??? We’ve got to purge Reform Math and now the Core Standards.

For years I thought non-phonics instruction in reading was the worst gimmick devised by our educators. But as I looked at New Math, I thought: this is nuts. no way you’d teach a kid like this. So now there are two “worst” gimmicks.

(Google “36: The Assault on Math” for more of this analysis.)


24 posted on 10/05/2010 5:54:15 PM PDT by BruceDeitrickPrice (education reform)
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