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To: cripplecreek
Something like 7 generations seperated them from Britain. As I understand it, the colonists were considerably taller than the brits as well.

And "biscuit" colored (darker of skin) according to the British solders. And more inclined to bath.

Americans were already a mix of British, Dutch, Irish, African and Native American. Not surprising, the people who came over from Great Britain were mostly males. Few of them had the money to order a wife from merry ol' England. They had to find mates among the available females, which meant from the Dutch families if you were high class enough, from transported female convicts (many which were Irish) or from free blacks or a local "Tame Indian".

That was in the cities, out on the frontier your choices were even sparser.

128 posted on 10/09/2010 12:21:43 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (The Doctrine of Nachofication: The belief that everything tastes better with melted cheese.)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear
The two very large but largely ignored groups were the Scandinavians and the Germans ~ breeding like bunnies they were pushing the frontier to its limits.

But you had to go out there to find them.

Then there was the Collins family. They had so many girls (in Kentucky, et al ~ dozens actually) some of them were married off to Oneida Indian warriors ~ who were probably white guys anyway.

Anyone finding a Collins in their ancestry out on the frontier should check out the Collins-Ritchy book. That will save you thousands of hours of fruitless wandering in the genealogical records. Most of that stuff is here!

137 posted on 10/09/2010 2:08:21 PM PDT by muawiyah ("GIT OUT THE WAY" The Republicans are coming)
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