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Texas Man Killed by Pet Deer. Rutting Season Blamed
AssociatedContent/Yahoo ^ | Nov. 14th, 2010 | Sherry Tomfeld

Posted on 11/14/2010 5:55:19 AM PST by stillafreemind

Gerald Rushton was killed by his pet European red stag deer. While feeding the animal he was attacked by the buck and was stomped and gored by it. This was all witnessed by his granddaughter who immediately ran to get Mrs. Rushton who then called 911 for help.

(Excerpt) Read more at associatedcontent.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Miscellaneous; Outdoors; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: buck; domestic; man; wildanimal
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Boy this can happen in the wink of an eye. The guy didn't stand a chance. Hormones are everything when it comes to animals and heat.
1 posted on 11/14/2010 5:55:23 AM PST by stillafreemind
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To: stillafreemind

The buck stopped there.


2 posted on 11/14/2010 6:00:42 AM PST by bunkerhill7
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To: stillafreemind

That kinda sucks..


3 posted on 11/14/2010 6:00:57 AM PST by goseminoles
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To: stillafreemind
We have an abundance of deer in Ohio. You can see their behavior change with the season. I know a man with a deer farm who got his leg gored by a deer, same situation, although this deer had been farm raised from infancy. Instincts are real.
4 posted on 11/14/2010 6:01:56 AM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: stillafreemind

Regardless of how cute and fuzzy they are when little, wild animals do not make good pets, especially large wild animals. You can’t domesticate a wild animal just because you catch it when it’s a baby. Neutering might help but down deep they are still wild. I’m sure there have been exceptions but it’s not worth the risk.

This also applies to all large animals, even domesticated animals, during breeding season. I had a 2,000 pound Beefmaster bull that was a pet but when the cows came in heat you’d better stay out of the pasture. Any other time we could ride him, brush him and do anything with him but during breeding season he was a terror.


5 posted on 11/14/2010 6:04:04 AM PST by Melinda in TN
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To: stillafreemind

I appraised a house in michigan on acreage. They had two deer penned up. I looked and the bucks antlers were sawed off. I ask why and the wife told me that the deer attacked her husband. So he called his brother they roped hog tied the deer and removed them. This was in October. So I believe it.


6 posted on 11/14/2010 6:09:02 AM PST by 70th Division (I love my country but fear my government!)
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To: Melinda in TN

Your response is fascinating. I wonder what would happen if you took a wild animal raised in captivity as a “pet” and bred it only with other wild animals raised in the same manner. If you did that for several generations, would the wildness be bred out?

I had a Doberman Pinscher that came from a long line of domesticated Dobermans. He was a wonderful, wonderful pet, companion, and friend. But, when push came to shove, genetics won out, and Baron was still a Dobie.


7 posted on 11/14/2010 6:10:19 AM PST by hampdenkid
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To: stillafreemind
Hormones are everything when it comes to animals and heat.

My wife said something similar the other day.

8 posted on 11/14/2010 6:11:28 AM PST by Pearls Before Swine (/s, in case you need to ask)
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To: stillafreemind

Sure seems mighty early for the rut to start,,,

Ain’t had many long cold nights...


9 posted on 11/14/2010 6:14:57 AM PST by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
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To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68

We’re starting to see them now. Cold is upon us the last 2-3 days so the boys are on the move lookin’ for lovin’.


10 posted on 11/14/2010 6:20:56 AM PST by stillafreemind
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To: hampdenkid

Captivity isn’t the key. You must also kill off the animals with the sharpest teeth, the strongest horns, the most aggressive dispositions, the longest mouth, ....... so you’ll want to try: http://www.google.com/search?source=ig&hl=en&rlz=1G1GGLQ_ENUS375&q=russia+fox+domestication&btnG=Google+Search&aq=f&oq=


11 posted on 11/14/2010 6:26:40 AM PST by muawiyah (GIT OUT THE WAY ~ REPUBLICANS COMIN' THROUGH)
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To: stillafreemind

These stories remind us of the remarkable skill of our ancestors in successfully domesticating wild animals for food, skins and milk. The breeding and culling took centuries - we could still learn basic common sense from them.

Sadly, this guy leaves a daughter who will have nightmares for the rest of her life - just because he thought he knew more than the experts (who warned him several times).


12 posted on 11/14/2010 6:27:55 AM PST by sodpoodle (Despair; man's surrender. Laughter; God 's redemption.)
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To: hampdenkid

It would take several generations and it would still be risky. Dogs originate from wolves but have been crossbred for thousands of years to be trustworthy pets. The instincts that would allow them to survive in the wild has mostly been bred out but a few still have the pack survival instinct.

Wild animals that have been in captivity for only 100 years or so are still mostly wild. Take American Bison for example. People have been raising them in captivity for generations but they still retain a lot of “wild” and can’t be trusted. Wolf/dog hybrids are popular but they are dangerous IMO because they are a very confused animal. You never know part you will see in every situation.

IMO, no animal, domesticated or not, is completely trustworthy during breeding season. Even perfectly raised dogs can be different when breeding or raising pups. I’ve lived on a farm all my life and raised cattle, horses and hogs. You never turn your back on a bull, a boar hog or a stud horse during breeding season. :-)


13 posted on 11/14/2010 6:31:04 AM PST by Melinda in TN
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To: muawiyah

Thank you. So apparently there is some small hope for the miscreants in our midst.


14 posted on 11/14/2010 6:37:24 AM PST by hampdenkid
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To: Melinda in TN

Thank you for your real-world insights. This is why I always turn to FR’s “Broadband Journalists” for my news and analysis.


15 posted on 11/14/2010 6:39:55 AM PST by hampdenkid
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To: hampdenkid
Domestic foxes from a 50 year Russian breeding program.
16 posted on 11/14/2010 6:45:18 AM PST by InternetTuffGuy
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To: stillafreemind

I showed 34 last night and down to 31 last week,,,

Maybe that breed is different,,,

The whitetails haven’t started yet,,,

The kids reported last

week that there was no signs of scrapes or rubs,,,

They left out friday with their Parade to try again,,,

They have taked 5 good bucks in 3 years out of my old spot.


17 posted on 11/14/2010 6:51:18 AM PST by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
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To: InternetTuffGuy

Thanks for that! The interesting part of the article is that they only bred “friendly” foxes to each other over 50 years to get offspring that had that genetic trait. Their physical appearance also changed over 50 years so that they no longer resembled wild foxes. Fifty years is a lot of generations in fox life span. Most wild animals that are raised in captivity aren’t raised that way. They are just plucked out of the wild with no consideration to personality traits. I’m sure it would make a big difference if they were bred over several generations by selective breeding. Even domestic dogs can be bred that way to insure that only the best traits are passed on to future generations. Unfortunately, not all breeders are good breeders.


18 posted on 11/14/2010 6:55:41 AM PST by Melinda in TN
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To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68

That was no White Tail that got him...He must have imported it...It was a European Red Stag..There is a picture with the article...look at the spread on it.


19 posted on 11/14/2010 6:56:31 AM PST by panthermom
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To: hampdenkid

Deer are dangerous animals irrespective of what you may see in a petting zoo.


20 posted on 11/14/2010 6:57:47 AM PST by Citizen Tom Paine (An old sailor sends)
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To: Pearls Before Swine
We came upon a buck on our 4-wheeler and he charged us.

They're absolutely "crazy" during rutting season!

21 posted on 11/14/2010 6:58:07 AM PST by moondoggie
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To: stillafreemind

Classic “deer bit me in the neck” 911 call.

http://www.maniacworld.com/deer-hit-my-car-then-bit-my-neck.html

Language warning.


22 posted on 11/14/2010 7:09:52 AM PST by FreedomPoster (No Representation without Taxation!)
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To: stillafreemind

Classic “deer bit me in the neck” 911 call.

http://www.maniacworld.com/deer-hit-my-car-then-bit-my-neck.html

Language warning.


23 posted on 11/14/2010 7:10:15 AM PST by FreedomPoster (No Representation without Taxation!)
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To: panthermom

I saw that,,,

550lbs. is much larger than the local whitetail,,,

I’m in NW Louisiana here,,,

30 miles or so from that area,,,

No rut here yet,,,

Folks hunt over feed plots here in the first part of the

season...


24 posted on 11/14/2010 7:14:44 AM PST by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
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To: stillafreemind

What blows me away are the number of stories like this. We (humans) used to KILL these things with rocks, knifes, and our bare hands, now we are at their mercy. Crazy upside down world.

Condolences to the family.


25 posted on 11/14/2010 7:18:00 AM PST by ConservativeChris
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To: hampdenkid; Salamander

Uh...’Domesticated’ Dobermans?


26 posted on 11/14/2010 7:34:51 AM PST by LongElegantLegs (To be determined...)
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To: stillafreemind

“Pet” deer. You have to be kidding me. There is a reason they are called “wild” animals.


27 posted on 11/14/2010 7:47:28 AM PST by Opinionated Blowhard
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To: hampdenkid

“Your response is fascinating. I wonder what would happen if you took a wild animal raised in captivity as a “pet” and bred it only with other wild animals raised in the same manner. If you did that for several generations, would the wildness be bred out?”

Some folks did that with the ancestor of the modern wolf about 150,000 years ago and got a dog. But then, they don’t make people like they used to - they were pretty tough.

They also did something similar with wild hogs, sheep, horses, cats, etc. The Russians did it recently with wild foxes.

It depends on the animal, the circumstances and the people.

You need a particular kind of species - one with a short lifespan - but not too short, one you can control - sort of (ever see a picture of an aurochs - the ancestor of modern cattle?), etc.

Given enough time, patience - and casualties - you could probably domesticate most anything.


28 posted on 11/14/2010 7:56:24 AM PST by ZULU (No nation which tried to tolerate Islam escaped Islamization.)
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To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68

550 lbs????

Sounds like a sumo deer!!!


29 posted on 11/14/2010 7:57:58 AM PST by ZULU (No nation which tried to tolerate Islam escaped Islamization.)
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To: bunkerhill7

PMS. Premating Syndrome.


30 posted on 11/14/2010 7:59:26 AM PST by Vinnie (You're Nobody 'Til Somebody Jihads You)
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To: Melinda in TN

We have a forest preserve nearby with a gang of rogue deer. Every year during rutting season, they kill one, maybe two people- usually hobos or a college kid who had too much to drink. Last week they cornered a bear and ate him.


31 posted on 11/14/2010 8:01:12 AM PST by Krankor (It's good news week someone's dropped a bomb somewhere contaminating atmosphere)
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To: stillafreemind
This is a European Red Stag very similar to our Elk. They raise them commercially in New Zealand for food but they cut their horns off.
32 posted on 11/14/2010 8:03:00 AM PST by Ditter
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To: Krankor
We have a forest preserve nearby with a gang of rogue deer. Every year during rutting season, they kill one, maybe two people- usually hobos or a college kid who had too much to drink. Last week they cornered a bear and ate him.

They should be hunted and taken out of the gene pool. If they are that bad their genes should not be passed on to other generations. Any rutting buck can be dangerous but those sound like they have learned to kill just for the heck of it.

33 posted on 11/14/2010 8:09:34 AM PST by Melinda in TN
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To: moondoggie
They're absolutely "crazy" during rutting season!

Animals Gone Wild!

Photobucket

34 posted on 11/14/2010 8:11:53 AM PST by GunsAndBibles
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To: stillafreemind
As Col. Colt as my witness, I will never be rutted again...


Frowning takes 68 muscles.
Smiling takes 6.
Pulling this trigger takes 2.
I'm lazy.

35 posted on 11/14/2010 8:14:02 AM PST by The Comedian (I enjoy progressives, especially in a light cream sauce.)
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To: Krankor

Are you pissing on my shoes again? A gang of rogue deer ate a bear? Yeah, right. What were their gang colors? Real tree or mossy oak?


36 posted on 11/14/2010 8:15:18 AM PST by GunsAndBibles
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To: ZULU

That sure is a big one alright,,,

I was just thinking back to the late 50’s,,,

My Dad killed a whitetail that was just short of the

state record,,,250lbs. +,,,

Made a nice mount...


37 posted on 11/14/2010 8:18:28 AM PST by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
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To: ZULU

Think Elk!


38 posted on 11/14/2010 8:20:04 AM PST by Ditter
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To: stillafreemind

How Rudolph’s nose got red.


39 posted on 11/14/2010 8:21:02 AM PST by UnbelievingScumOnTheOtherSide (REPEAL WASHINGTON! -- Islam Delenda Est! -- I Want Constantinople Back. -- Rumble thee forth.)
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To: hampdenkid

I had a Doberman Pinscher that came from a long line of domesticated Dobermans. He was a wonderful, wonderful pet, companion, and friend. But, when push came to shove, genetics won out, and Baron was still a Dobie.


Ain’t that the truth! I have a Dobe that comes from schutzhund lines. Let’s just say he has a strong prey drive! Was trying to explain this to someone the other day without very much success!


40 posted on 11/14/2010 8:23:44 AM PST by 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten
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To: stillafreemind
I assume he got gored by the antlers, not...well, let’s just say it could have been worse:

Sex-Starved Moose Defecates on Car

41 posted on 11/14/2010 8:27:35 AM PST by RichInOC (No! BAD Rich! (What'd I say?))
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To: GunsAndBibles
Hey!
1) A bear was missing (There were posters on the trees)
2) I saw some deer chewing on something
3) One of them was wearing what looked like one of those big Russian fur hats.

Add up the facts, my friend, and I think you'll come to the same conclusion.
42 posted on 11/14/2010 8:35:45 AM PST by Krankor (It's good news week someone's dropped a bomb somewhere contaminating atmosphere)
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To: Krankor

Get back to me when ya got a picture of the bear on a carton of milk...


43 posted on 11/14/2010 8:46:01 AM PST by GunsAndBibles
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To: Krankor

“Last week they cornered a bear and ate him.”

Tragedies such as this are the reason we must maintain the right to arm bears!


44 posted on 11/14/2010 8:51:48 AM PST by headsonpikes (Genocide is the highest sacrament of socialism - "Who-whom?")
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To: headsonpikes
Tragedies such as this are the reason we must maintain the right to arm bears!

You should be beaten with a stick for that one. LOL!
45 posted on 11/14/2010 8:59:38 AM PST by Krankor (It's good news week someone's dropped a bomb somewhere contaminating atmosphere)
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To: LongElegantLegs

Don’t ask me.

Mine’s feral.

Captured him myself, running with a pack of wild Dobermanns in the mountains of Hungary.

What a hell of an adventure *that* was.

/facepalm


46 posted on 11/14/2010 10:48:19 AM PST by Salamander (I may be lonely but I'm never alone...and the nights may pass me by....but I never cry.....)
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To: GunsAndBibles

Bambi likes blood.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQOQdBLHrLk&NR=1

In Scotland, they were scarfing up a *lot* of critters.


47 posted on 11/14/2010 10:57:19 AM PST by Salamander (I may be lonely but I'm never alone...and the nights may pass me by....but I never cry.....)
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To: 2 Kool 2 Be 4-Gotten

Mine is a Euro and none of his ancestors were allowed to breed unless one or both parents held SCH or other working titles.

First Dobermann I haven’t had to protection train.

He was born knowing his job...and he does it exceedingly well.


48 posted on 11/14/2010 10:59:46 AM PST by Salamander (I may be lonely but I'm never alone...and the nights may pass me by....but I never cry.....)
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To: headsonpikes

LOL


49 posted on 11/14/2010 11:00:37 AM PST by Salamander (I may be lonely but I'm never alone...and the nights may pass me by....but I never cry.....)
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To: stillafreemind

RIP.


50 posted on 11/14/2010 11:31:01 AM PST by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Amber Lamps !"~~)
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