Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

To: PGR88

I hypothesized about this sort of thing a few years back and every responder on FR couldn’t believe I was remotely serious.


2 posted on 11/24/2010 9:09:12 PM PST by G Larry (When you're "RIGHT" you don't look for ways to compromise!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]


To: G Larry

>>>I hypothesized about this sort of thing a few years back and every responder on FR couldn’t believe I was remotely serious.<<<

You’re an “innovator.” It means when change occurs, some of us can see it coming. However, it means having to put up with a fair amount of s*** before everyone else comes around.


6 posted on 11/24/2010 9:19:05 PM PST by redpoll
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies ]

To: G Larry

I didn’t read your post back then, but I would have agreed with you. There were some turbines installed west of some of our farms. They don’t affect the large storms, but the smaller showers break up right over the top of them and re-form 10 or twenty miles to the east.

How anyone could argue about this when you can CLEARLY see wind farms on otherwise clear weather radar, is beyond me.


7 posted on 11/24/2010 9:19:24 PM PST by garandgal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies ]

To: G Larry
From the article: It is not just a herdsman's superstition or his distaste for modern technology. Siqinbateer's claim is backed up by government statistics.

This reflects that until the government sponsored PhD sees it, it isn't real. Why do these people routinely ignore the observations of people, often over decades, whose livelihood depends on the land? Pretty stupid, if you ask me.

I hypothesized about this sort of thing a few years back and every responder on FR couldn’t believe I was remotely serious.

I must not have responded then. The energy which is converted to electricity comes from weather systems. I do not pretend to know what a significant level of energy reduction would be, and I suspect that it would vary depending on the strength of the weather system, but at some point it should have an effect--especially on local weather patterns. If the localized phenomneon of an urban heat island can affect local climate, an extensive windfarm should be able to do the same.

9 posted on 11/24/2010 9:40:53 PM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies ]

To: G Larry

Heck, I’ve been thinking about it too. If you look at wind farms in the US, say in West Texas and California (big treeless areas), there is no way anyone can say that they are not acting as a huge dragging force on air flow. I’m not sure if that messes up the environment, but it sure might.


11 posted on 11/24/2010 10:28:01 PM PST by BobL
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies ]

To: G Larry

Heh. I wondered about it too...

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2337269/posts?page=7#7

Now I have to show the story to my dad who thought I was nuts for even suggesting something like it.


14 posted on 11/25/2010 3:30:19 AM PST by TruthBeforeAll (To a liberal, an idea that is a complete disaster, is only so because there's not enough of it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies ]

To: G Larry

I think it’s inevitable that these massive wind farms would affect the environment and climate, at least locally. I think they’re far more intrusive in any way - visually, auditorially, in terms of their damage to wildlife (migratory flocks fly into them) and probably in terms of their effect on the local climate - than any other form of energy production.


15 posted on 11/25/2010 7:12:48 AM PST by livius
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson