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Study shows vitamin D deficiencies may impact onset of autoimmune lung disease
University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center ^ | January 4, 2011 | Unknown

Posted on 01/04/2011 6:27:35 AM PST by decimon

CINCINNATI—A new study shows that vitamin D deficiency could be linked to the development and severity of certain autoimmune lung diseases.

These findings are being reported in the Jan. 4 edition of the journal Chest.

Brent Kinder, MD, UC Health pulmonologist, director of the Interstitial Lung Disease Center at the University of Cincinnati and lead investigator on the study, says vitamin D deficiencies have been found to affect the development of other autoimmune diseases, like lupus and type 1 diabetes.

"We wanted to see if lack of sufficient vitamin D would also be seen in patients who are diagnosed with an autoimmune interstitial lung disease (ILD) and whether it was associated with reduced lung function," he says.

Some ILD patients first discover they have an undifferentiated connective tissue disease, a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects multiple organ systems but is not developed enough for physicians to easily recognize and categorize.

Autoimmune diseases occur when the body produces abnormal cells that turn on the body and attack major organs and tissues. Connective tissue diseases include lupus, scleroderma, polymyositis, vasculitis, rheumatoid arthritis and Sjogren's syndrome.

"ILD is a group of diseases that mainly affect the tissues of the lungs instead of the airways, like asthma and emphysema do," says Kinder. "It causes scarring of the lungs, is more difficult to diagnosis and treat than other kinds of lung diseases and is often fatal.

"Since vitamin D deficiency has implications for other manifestations of autoimmune illnesses, we wanted to see it had an effect on the lungs of this patient population."

Researchers evaluated 118 patients from the UC ILD Center database—67 with connective tissue disease-related ILD and 51 with other causes of lung fibrosis—for serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, which indicate levels of vitamin D in the body. Then, they evaluated associations between these serum levels and the patients' conditions.

Overall, those with connective tissue disease-related ILD were more likely to have vitamin D deficiency—52 percent versus 20 percent—and insufficiency—79 percent versus 31 percent—than other forms of ILD.

Among this same group of patients, reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were strongly associated with reduced lung function.

"These findings suggest that there is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with ILD, particularly those with connective tissue disease," Kinder says. "Therefore, vitamin D may have a role in the development of connective tissue disease-related ILD and patients' worsening lung function.

"One of the next steps is to see if supplementation will improve lung function for these patients."

He adds that if these findings are confirmed and vitamin D supplementation is shown to be effective in clinical trials, this may also provide a more natural, inexpensive treatment for the illness.

"Vitamin D is known to be a critical dietary factor for bone and skin health," he says. "Now, we're learning that it could potentially be modified as a treatment to improve ILD as opposed to other, more toxic therapies."

###

This study was funded by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Research Loan Repayment Grant and a K23 award from the NIH.


TOPICS: Health/Medicine; Science
KEYWORDS: d; hypercalcemia; kidney; kidneydamage; kidneytransplant; pancreas; pancreaticcancer; vitamind; vitamindtoxicity
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1 posted on 01/04/2011 6:27:38 AM PST by decimon
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To: neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers; Ladysmith; Roos_Girl

Ping


2 posted on 01/04/2011 6:28:11 AM PST by decimon
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To: decimon

Waiting for the Go-out-in-the-sun-even-if-you-live-at-the-North-pole crowd to show up!

/sarcasm...


3 posted on 01/04/2011 6:34:54 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: decimon

wont be long before the Obama Care people feel the need to regulate Vit D....apparently it works, which is the first big no no.


4 posted on 01/04/2011 6:38:09 AM PST by ConservativeDude
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To: djf
I don't see any warnings about VITAMIN D OVERDOSE problems in this Article. Vitamin D is cumulative. My wife, an ER Nurse, says the body uses Vitamin D when in sunlight. All it takes is 15 minutes of exposure daily to the face or hands to give what the body needs.

Yes, watch out for the panacea crowd and for the Side Effect problems to be ignored.

5 posted on 01/04/2011 6:39:11 AM PST by sr4402
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To: sr4402

Your body uses Vitamin D all the time.
Your body can make Vitamin D in the sunlight, but ONLY if the sun is 60 degrees or more above the horizon, which is for all practical purposes, directly overhead.

Of you can, please point me at the websites that have documented cases of Vitamin D overdose.
Thanks!


6 posted on 01/04/2011 6:44:02 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: sr4402

Doing a searches for vitamin D indicates vitamin D deficiency is rampant and vitamin D overdose is very rare.

“Acute overdose requires between 15,000 µg/d (600,000 IU per day) and 42,000 µg/d (1,680,000 IU per day) over a period of several days to months, with a safe intake level being 250 µg/d (10,000 IU per day).”


7 posted on 01/04/2011 6:50:48 AM PST by Varda
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To: djf; sr4402
Your body can make Vitamin D in the sunlight, but ONLY if the sun is 60 degrees or more above the horizon...

That's what really sold me on supplementation. For most of the year there is little to no opportunity to make vitamin D from sunlight. And when the opportunity is there is when we most try to avoid direct sunlight.

8 posted on 01/04/2011 7:01:18 AM PST by decimon
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To: decimon

I have MS, and when vitamin D deficiency first surfaced as an issue in MS research (a few years ago) I was tested. I was severely deficient...took 50,000 units once a week for awhile.

I still take it on a regular basis. But I grew up in a very sunny climate, spent vacations at the beach every summer, , lived in FL most of my life (with the exception of a few years living on a caribbean island and a few years in NC), and still was afflicted w/MS.

So my question about vitamin D is a horse/cart thing. Did I have vitamin D deficiency and that led to the MS...or do I have vitamin D deficiency because I have MS and heat sensitivity and rarely go in the sun anymore.

Do people with an illness (they mention connective tissue disorders which can cause pain and would limit your activities) just naturally spend less time outdoors and thus develop vitamin D deficiency?

‘Tis a puzzlement!


9 posted on 01/04/2011 7:10:08 AM PST by dawn53
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To: STARWISE

Vitamin D ping!


10 posted on 01/04/2011 7:14:49 AM PST by maggief
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To: decimon

I investigated this a few years back.
There are many thousands of websites that talk about Vitamin D overdose. But probably fewer that one in a hundred of these have details of actual cases of anybody suffering from it!

Plus, your body can and does store it in the fatty tissues if you get more than you need, it has a half life of somewhere between 30-45 days.

A couple times a week, I take 10-16 thousand units, whether or not I’ve gotten any sun exposure.
The risk of NOT GETTING enough is far higher than the risk of getting too much. And it does not surprise me at all that two of the biggies (colon cancer and heart disease) are far more prevalent these days since all of the “stay out of the sun” hoopla has been the rage.

Everyone has to decide for themselves, but personally, unless somebody lives in the tropics, I would bet there is a very high probability that they are deficient.


11 posted on 01/04/2011 7:15:15 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: dawn53

Did you use any type of sun block when out in the sun all those years?


12 posted on 01/04/2011 7:16:28 AM PST by Roos_Girl (The world is full of educated derelicts. - Calvin Coolidge)
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To: djf
Your body can make Vitamin D in the sunlight, but ONLY if the sun is 60 degrees or more above the horizon, which is for all practical purposes, directly overhead.

That sounds like someone could only get half pregnant ..... Exposure is Exposure unless someone is referring to the Heat of the sun creating Vity D then i might buy the Quote of 60* above.

13 posted on 01/04/2011 7:19:51 AM PST by ATOMIC_PUNK (Any man may make a mistake ; none but a fool will persist in it . { Latin proverb })
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To: Smokin' Joe

Vitamin D ping. Interesting read.


14 posted on 01/04/2011 7:22:07 AM PST by azishot
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To: Roos_Girl

Heck no...sunblock was against my religion, LOL. This was years ago before sunblock was even thought of. We slathered on stuff to make us tan more evenly, but it didn’t have any UV blockers in it. Our cure for sunburn was Noxema, LOL.

It’s a wonder I don’t have skin cancer because I would be a perfect candidate. I used to burn till I blistered when I was a kid/teenager. In addition to living in Florida our family spent a weeks on vacation at the beach each summer.

First MS symptoms showed up in college, so I was getting plenty of sun to that time. Of course once MS showed up, I found that my tolerance for heat was greatly reduced.


15 posted on 01/04/2011 7:25:00 AM PST by dawn53
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To: dawn53
‘Tis a puzzlement!

To me, verily.

The last thing I read about MS and vitamin D was of some study in Canada. No correlation was found. But your cart/horse thing occurred to me with that reading. If I had it right then the researchers found no curative effect of vitamin D for MS but that says nothing about a possible preventative effect.

And that was but a single study so I don't know where the issue stands.

16 posted on 01/04/2011 7:27:10 AM PST by decimon
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To: ATOMIC_PUNK

It requires UVB radiation to make Vitamin D.

UVB is a short-wavelength ultraviolet. It doesn’t even make it to the ground if the sun is low in the sky. None of it.

A person say in Alaska could sit in the sun the entire day and make NO Vitamin D at all.

I don’t make this chit up...


17 posted on 01/04/2011 7:29:12 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: decimon

For an excellent, informative and entertaining video on Vitamin D research done by Dr. Michael Holick, go here:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cq1t9WqOD-0
It will make you run out and get that Vitamin D supplement like I did!


18 posted on 01/04/2011 7:31:05 AM PST by SFmom (Hey, MHT, weigh in!)
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To: dawn53

LOL, yep, everyone knows Noxema was the best cure for sunburn! I’ve lived in FL my whole life, mom tried to slather me up with sunscreen, but I’d just run and jump in the water and rub it all off. :) I never blistered boy have I had some bad bad burns, and I’ve already had a pre-cancer spot removed from my back.


19 posted on 01/04/2011 7:31:19 AM PST by Roos_Girl (The world is full of educated derelicts. - Calvin Coolidge)
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To: ATOMIC_PUNK
...Exposure is Exposure...

Apparently not. The story is that Earth's atmosphere filters out the UVB rays when the Sun is low in the sky. No UVB, no vitamin D.

20 posted on 01/04/2011 7:31:43 AM PST by decimon
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To: ATOMIC_PUNK

http://nodivisions.com/blog/2009/09/04/Vitamin_D_Or_Youre_Not_Getting_Enough_Sun


21 posted on 01/04/2011 7:32:35 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: SFmom; blam

Yeah, Holick may be the original vitamin D evangelist. But I’m in the D flock of my own accord. ;-)


22 posted on 01/04/2011 7:40:17 AM PST by decimon
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To: djf; ATOMIC_PUNK

Yep, that’s right. UVB is required and it’s filtered out by the atmosphere when the sun is low in the sky. I have read you need at least 40 percent of your body exposed for “optimal” Vitamin D production though, and stay out just long enough for your skin to just start turning pink; approx. 15 minutes depending on your skin tone.


23 posted on 01/04/2011 7:41:43 AM PST by Roos_Girl (The world is full of educated derelicts. - Calvin Coolidge)
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To: djf

...actually, Whales are loaded with vitamin D.


24 posted on 01/04/2011 8:05:09 AM PST by Hotdog
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To: Hotdog

Probably from krill.
Or for whales that eat fish, that means whole fish, and that means fish livers, which are full of the stuff.


25 posted on 01/04/2011 8:08:44 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: djf

Cod liver oil! I can’t believe my 4 year old son likes it. It does have orange flavoring, though,not like the stuff my dad would give us when we were kids.


26 posted on 01/04/2011 8:28:12 AM PST by kickonly88 (I love fossil fuel!)
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To: kickonly88

Yup.
But I have to say that out of ALL the supplements you can take, fish liver oil is probably one you want to be careful with. In fact almost any liver type substances.

There are stories of explorers, etc. in the arctic who run out of food, then after a while catch a polar bear or whatever and eat the liver.

Then they keel over dead from Vitamin A poisoning or Vit D overdose.

So it can happen!! And fish livers are loaded with the stuff, so be careful!


27 posted on 01/04/2011 8:42:04 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: djf
There are stories of explorers, etc. in the arctic who run out of food, then after a while catch a polar bear or whatever and eat the liver.

Then they keel over dead from Vitamin A poisoning or Vit D overdose.

No offense but I don't believe that has happened. The vitamin A overdose is possible but that would require a whole lotta liver.

28 posted on 01/04/2011 8:56:00 AM PST by decimon
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To: Hotdog
...actually, Whales are loaded with vitamin D.

Old news - that's what Jonah said among other things.

29 posted on 01/04/2011 8:57:06 AM PST by newfreep (Palin/DeMint 2012 - Bolton: Secy of State)
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To: djf
It requires UVB radiation to make Vitamin D. UVB is a short-wavelength ultraviolet. It doesn’t even make it to the ground if the sun is low in the sky. None of it. A person say in Alaska could sit in the sun the entire day and make NO Vitamin D at all. I don’t make this chit up...

Great - can you provide a reference to this? As far as energy is concerned - the shorter the wavelength usually the more penetrating power. I'm not so sure there is a proportionate difference between UVA and UVB exposure as the sun agle changes. As the angle increases TOTAL UV exposure drops as the light has to go through more atmosphere but i'm interested in seeing your citation that UVB halts sooner than UVA. Thanks

30 posted on 01/04/2011 9:10:59 AM PST by corkoman
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To: decimon

There is disagreement about the conclusions.

But two facts are known: They ate the livers, and they did die.

http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/183_11_051205/car10291_fm.html


31 posted on 01/04/2011 9:12:36 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: corkoman

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=839&q=UV+exposure+sun+angle&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=&gs_rfai=


32 posted on 01/04/2011 9:15:30 AM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: djf

Actually Vit D along with a couple others are cumulative- however like anything else it should be taken sensibly and there is no problem. Mega-doses are the reason people can get into trouble.

The medical literature suggests most older people do not have/ get enough- a google check will bring up some reliable data.


33 posted on 01/04/2011 9:18:34 AM PST by handmade
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To: corkoman

“Sun exposure Most people meet their vitamin D needs through exposure to sunlight [5,31]. Ultraviolet (UV) B radiation with a wavelength of 290-315 nanometers penetrates uncovered skin and converts cutaneous 7-dehydrocholesterol to previtamin D3, which in turn becomes vitamin D3 [9,32,33]. Season, geographic latitude, time of day, cloud cover, smog, skin melanin content, and sunscreen are among the factors that affect UV radiation exposure and vitamin D synthesis [33]. The UV energy above 42 degrees north latitude (a line approximately between the northern border of California and Boston) is insufficient for cutaneous vitamin D synthesis from November through February [5]; in far northern latitudes, this reduced intensity lasts for up to 6 months. In the United States, latitudes below 34 degrees north (a line between Los Angeles and Columbia, South Carolina) allow for cutaneous production of vitamin D throughout the year [27].”

http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp


34 posted on 01/04/2011 9:41:39 AM PST by decimon
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To: djf
There is disagreement about the conclusions.

Yeah, but dog liver?

35 posted on 01/04/2011 9:49:50 AM PST by decimon
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To: decimon

I believe I can vouch for this.

Over the summer, I was taking dairy products and outside a LOT for hypocalcemia, getting plenty of vitamin D in. In the last few month, I had some symptoms that were puzzling: my hair was falling out, I had a growing problem with insomnia, and was having breathing issues. Just couldn’t get deep breaths in the way I was.

On Christmas night, I wound up in ER thinking I was having a stroke or heart attack. Turns out the calcium in my blood dropped off and the phosphorus levels were high (turned out to be hypoparathyroidism). So started taking Oscal and calcitriol, a prescrip vitamin D, which I’ll be doing for the rest of my life.

All my odd symptoms had reversed, including my breathing issues. I can breathe in nice and deep again and no longer am having problems with it at night.


36 posted on 01/04/2011 10:21:59 AM PST by Ladysmith ("A community organizer can't bitch when communities organize." Rush Limbaugh)
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To: decimon; SFmom
This is the article from back in 2006 that got my attention. I've taken vitamin D suppliments ever since I read this:

The Antibiotic Vitamin

37 posted on 01/04/2011 10:39:06 AM PST by blam
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To: Varda
Doing a searches for vitamin D indicates vitamin D deficiency is rampant and vitamin D overdose is very rare.

You forgot that Vitamin D is in Milk and many other food products. So don't forget that when adding it all up.

38 posted on 01/04/2011 11:09:01 AM PST by sr4402
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To: decimon

People. To understand anything about an overdose of d, you’d have to know what is actually in your bloodstream. It’s not about your dosage. Everyone has a certain therapeutic dose to get you over 60 in your blood, the best amount to have in terms of health. For fighting disease or cancer you’d probably be better off with over 80 on your test results.

I was taking 2000 units all summer, plus some sun, and got tested. My levels were only 24, very low. No wonder I got the flu last year!

I upped my dose of D3 to 10,000 units, and after a few months, got tested again. Only 49, still too low! Now I am on 15,000 units. I hope I’m getting closer to the necessary therapeutic dose. Everyone is different, and you have to all stop bitching about overdose because it cannot happen if you don’t have the therapeutic amount of 60+ in your blood yet. Get tested. It’s not about dose alone.


39 posted on 01/04/2011 11:20:25 AM PST by Yaelle
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To: Yaelle
I was taking 2000 units all summer, plus some sun, and got tested. My levels were only 24, very low. No wonder I got the flu last year!

This is speculation, but...

Vitamin D in hard tablet form may not dissolve quickly enough. I use gel caps.

It's supposed to be taken with a meal and I do that but I also take some that is in caps of 1,000 mg of fish oil and 1,000 IU of vitamin D. Maybe that helps but I don't know.

40 posted on 01/04/2011 11:31:02 AM PST by decimon
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To: sr4402

D is in miniscule amounts in milk and other foods. Your skin produces 20,000iu of D in just a few minutes of sun exposure. Even the newest supplements are in the 1000-2000iu range with standard vitamins containing only 400iu. That’s way below what it takes to get an overdose. Some rare people can overdose. The vast majority have the other problem, we need more.


41 posted on 01/04/2011 11:49:52 AM PST by Varda
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To: Yaelle

Quite correct. And if your doctor finds you have a deficiency, he’s liable to write you a prescription.

And in that form, he might have you taking one per day for two weeks, but not the measly 400 or even 1000 units.

Prescription Vit D comes in 50,000 unit tabs


42 posted on 01/04/2011 3:51:34 PM PST by djf (Touch my junk and I'll break yur mug!!!)
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To: djf

I suppose that could be a problem if I was ingesting the whole bottle at once.


43 posted on 01/04/2011 6:31:16 PM PST by kickonly88 (I love fossil fuel!)
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To: 2ndreconmarine; Fitzcarraldo; Covenantor; Mother Abigail; EBH; Dog Gone; ...

Ping....(Thanks for the ping, azishot!)


44 posted on 01/04/2011 7:42:26 PM PST by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: ATOMIC_PUNK

Exposure is not exposure, since vitamin D requires UV exposure, which is cut dramatically when the sun is low in the sky.


45 posted on 01/04/2011 7:45:17 PM PST by MediaMole
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To: MediaMole

Thanks for the ping!


46 posted on 01/04/2011 8:25:57 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: MediaMole; Smokin' Joe

Oops, my “thanks for the ping” should have been addressed to Smokin’ Joe.


47 posted on 01/04/2011 8:26:46 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: decimon

sfl


48 posted on 01/04/2011 8:58:36 PM PST by phockthis
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To: sr4402; SunkenCiv
Hypercalcemia & Vitamin D overdose

Last month there were some articles in the news that large dose Vitamin D is not good, perhaps some of those articles were posted at FR.

I wonder how many docs would even recognize Vitamin D overload?

49 posted on 01/05/2011 3:53:25 AM PST by hennie pennie
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To: Yaelle; SunkenCiv
>>>> "....you have to all stop bitching about overdose because it cannot happen if you don't have the therapeutic amount of 60+ in your blood yet." <<<<

And why is it up to you to decide that people who cannot tolerate Vitamin D supplements should not participate in this thread?

Just recently there were articles in the news that SEVERE KIDNEY DAMAGE can result if you do NOT need Vitamin D and you follow the Online-Vitamin-D-Panacea-Crowd and take large amounts, because "EVERYONE" needs it and "nobody" EVER gets a vitamin D overdose.

50 posted on 01/05/2011 3:58:19 AM PST by hennie pennie
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