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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Virginia.edu ^ | 1884 (1885 in the US) | Mark Twain a.k.a. Samuel Clemens

Posted on 01/07/2011 8:26:26 PM PST by SunkenCiv

This thread will contain the entire text of "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain, who was not only a socialist, and never worked a day in his life, but also believed that William Shakespeare didn't write the works of William Shakespeare. IOW, he was a deeply flawed do-nothing who happened to become (temporarily) successful in middle age.

"All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn... American writing comes from that. There was nothing before. There has been nothing as good since." -- Ernest Hemingway, "Green Hills of Africa" (1935)
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TOPICS: Books/Literature; Education; Humor
KEYWORDS: alangribben; auburnuniversity; homeschooling; huckfinn; huckleberryfinn; kabumpokadumpo; marktwain; pages; samclemens; samuelclemens; tomsawyer
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1 posted on 01/07/2011 8:26:27 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: SunkenCiv

Of course he worked in his life - he worked on boats on the Mississippi
He also worked at a printing press, and a lot of other jobs. Later, he became a writer, and if you don’t think that’s work, try tossing off a novel one afternoon in your spare time.
Many prominent writers have questioned the authorship of Shakespeare’s work. I don’t agree with them, but it’s not ipso facto an indication of stupidity or evil.


2 posted on 01/07/2011 8:40:38 PM PST by kabumpo (Kabumpo)
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To: kabumpo
All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn... American writing comes from that. There was nothing before.

IIRC Moby Dick predated Huck by about 30 years. There's also Nathaniel Hawthorne.

That said, Clemens is clearly an American treasure.

3 posted on 01/07/2011 8:51:36 PM PST by SonOfDarkSkies
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To: SunkenCiv

4 posted on 01/07/2011 8:51:39 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: SunkenCiv
To suggest Mark Twain never worked a day in his life is ludicrous.

And, he was a damn fine author.

For those who have not read Huckleberry Finn, or who have not read it since their youth...I recommend giving it another run. I have recently and it's still astounding. He paints a portrait few could imagine.

5 posted on 01/07/2011 8:54:36 PM PST by Mariner (USS Tarawa, VQ3, USS Benjamin Stoddert, NAVCAMS WestPac, 7th Fleet, Navcommsta Puget Sound)
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To: SunkenCiv

Are you saying Finn was a socialist or
Twain?

Based on Twain’s writings he was a
conservative who believed in smaller
government.


6 posted on 01/07/2011 9:01:01 PM PST by Jo Nuvark (Those who bless Israel will be blessed, those who curse Israel will be cursed. Gen 12:3)
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To: SonOfDarkSkies

Moby Dick is unreadable.
Find me somebody that claims they’ve read it front to back (not an abridged version) and I’ll show you a liar.


7 posted on 01/07/2011 9:16:54 PM PST by Artemis Webb (What, if not a bagel and coffee, confirms the existence of a just and loving God?)
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To: SunkenCiv
IOW, he was a deeply flawed do-nothing who happened to become (temporarily) successful in middle age.

I guess that's why everyone today still knows of Twain and his newly released autobiography is a best seller.

8 posted on 01/07/2011 9:24:25 PM PST by Inyo-Mono (Had God not driven man from the Garden of Eden the Sierra Club surely would have.)
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To: Artemis Webb
Moby Dick is unreadable. Find me somebody that claims they’ve read it front to back (not an abridged version) and I’ll show you a liar.

I've read it in its entirety twice. Great book.

9 posted on 01/07/2011 9:28:12 PM PST by Prokopton
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To: Artemis Webb
Moby Dick is unreadable. Find me somebody that claims they’ve read it front to back (not an abridged version) and I’ll show you a liar.

lol...I haven't studied Mody Dick in so many years that I had forgotten how the original work stirred up such passions.

You have obviously tried to read it...and walked away angry. Can you remind us of why it was so unreadable?

10 posted on 01/07/2011 9:39:15 PM PST by SonOfDarkSkies
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To: SonOfDarkSkies

As a grade school boy who lived in a town on the Mississippi where Twain once lived, I and others studied Twain’s writings including Huckleberry Finn. I thought I had a copy of the book. However, right now I can’t locate it. However I do have my One Volume Edition of ‘ The Complete Short Stories and Famous Essays of MARK TWAIN’. It has over 1000 pages about Twain with his stories. Copywrites are from late 1880s to early 1900s. The one not in the Book is about ‘Huckleberry Finn’. Twain was a remarkable and prolific teller of stories and about world places and conditions.


11 posted on 01/07/2011 9:40:09 PM PST by noinfringers2
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To: Artemis Webb

I’ve read it and enjoyed it. I occasionally like to read something in that old style of writing in which the author took the time to say what he intended instead of pushing on to the next explosion.


12 posted on 01/07/2011 9:42:10 PM PST by tickmeister (tickmeister)
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To: SonOfDarkSkies

As a grade school boy who lived in a town on the Mississippi where Twain once lived, I and others studied Twain’s writings including Huckleberry Finn. I thought I had a copy of the book. However, right now I can’t locate it. However I do have my One Volume Edition of ‘ The Complete Short Stories and Famous Essays of MARK TWAIN’. It has over 1000 pages about Twain with his stories. Copywrites are from late 1880s to early 1900s. The one not in the Book is about ‘Huckleberry Finn’. Twain was a remarkable and prolific teller of stories and about world places and conditions.


13 posted on 01/07/2011 9:42:48 PM PST by noinfringers2
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To: SunkenCiv
...but also believed that William Shakespeare didn't write the works of William Shakespeare.

It's a fine point I make, but it's a point nonetheless: "William Shakespeare" wrote the plays of William Shakespeare.

But Twain had doubts about who precisely this "William Shakespeare" was.

As do many scholars.

14 posted on 01/07/2011 9:46:06 PM PST by Flycatcher (God speaks to us, through the supernal lightness of birds, in a special type of poetry.)
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To: Prokopton
Moby Dick is unreadable

That is like saying the U.S. Constitution is hard to understand.

15 posted on 01/07/2011 10:01:29 PM PST by oyez (The difference in genius and stupidity is that genius has limits.)
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To: Artemis Webb

I’ll admit I never could get through Moby Dick. And I really loved to read in my youth. Just plain painful. I never finished the comic book version either and hate the movie with Gregory Peck. Never watched all of it either.


16 posted on 01/07/2011 10:27:32 PM PST by packrat35 (America is rapidly becoming a police state that East Germany could be proud of!)
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To: Artemis Webb

“Moby Dick is unreadable.”

Preach it, brother.


17 posted on 01/07/2011 10:36:34 PM PST by Blue Ink
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To: noinfringers2
Well maybe you can help me. Clemens wrote about my ggggranduncle, Dr. Humphrey Peake, played some tricks on him. Then it was stated that Clemens used him as Dr. Wheelwright in some other book, The Mysterious Stranger in Hannibal".

I can seem to find that book or story, any clues?,

I have read many of the Twain/Clemens writing and books written about him, in my library. Just got the 100 yr. BIO Vol 1 for Christmas.

Visited Hannibal several years ago, great place.

18 posted on 01/07/2011 10:38:09 PM PST by annieokie
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To: Mariner
To suggest Mark Twain never worked a day in his life is ludicrous.

Well, Hemmingway considered himself a writer, and at the time was probably thinking of Twain as a newspaper columnist. (Bob Roach's Plan For Circumventing A Democrat) Columnist/communist- they kinda sound alike, I guess, but he also tried his hand as a publisher. So right there are two occupations which might get him on the shit-list of some literary-minded guys.

19 posted on 01/07/2011 10:40:55 PM PST by Seven plus One
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To: SunkenCiv

“never worked a day in his life”

Read “Life on the Mississippi. He didn’t just work on boats, he was a riverboat pilot (hence the pen name Mark Twain). “Life...” tells in detail how you become a riverboat pilot, which takes years of practice to get good at. And requires brains and an incredible memory. And it’s really hard — four hours on, four hours off.

Twain could be unpleasant, especially after the deaths of two of his daughters, but he was no slacker.


20 posted on 01/07/2011 10:44:14 PM PST by Blue Ink
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