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Myself ^ | Sunday, 9 January 2011 | Mayr Fortuna

Posted on 01/09/2011 5:13:33 AM PST by Mayr Fortuna

Freeppers?

In the sixties late century I had my first English Course which was Eletronic Teacher (one of this boondozels pseudo-cientific thing that used bone induction subliminar learning techs...) and at end sixties Thomas Gefferson House in Brazilia - Brazil for two years...

I do have great difficulty with the double letters in words, as pp, ll, ss and so on...

Can you help me with a rule?

(Excerpt) Read more at freerepublic.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Education
KEYWORDS: english; grammar; help; on
Much gratefull for all who answer this...

Also ask you to implement policy of correcting me when you find needed in phrase construction...

1 posted on 01/09/2011 5:13:36 AM PST by Mayr Fortuna
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To: Mayr Fortuna

zzot


2 posted on 01/09/2011 5:19:51 AM PST by GOP_Party_Animal
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To: GOP_Party_Animal

IBTTZZ


3 posted on 01/09/2011 5:25:20 AM PST by TN4Liberty (My tagline disappeared so this is my new one.)
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To: GOP_Party_Animal
L2OL


4 posted on 01/09/2011 5:26:00 AM PST by tomkat
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To: Mayr Fortuna

I wish you luck. English must be tricky to learn as a second language.


5 posted on 01/09/2011 5:27:01 AM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Very simple to understand. Let me take the word “Apple” as an example. Apple has two syllables “AP” + “PLE” (pronounced Ap-pul with the emphasis on the Ap)
It is confusing because some words begin or end with double letters where the rule of pronouncing the letter twice does not apply, such as “full” or the name “Aaron”.
In those cases the pronouncer would be a slightly stronger emphasis on the double letters.

Hope that helps.


6 posted on 01/09/2011 5:29:21 AM PST by nagdt ("None of my EX's live in Texas")
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Ibtz!


7 posted on 01/09/2011 5:30:36 AM PST by rotstan
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Rules aren’t very reliable. Often, double consonants are found in conjunction with short vowel sounds. Copper, hidden, tapping. Single consonants accompany long vowel sounds. Hoping, hiding, taping.


8 posted on 01/09/2011 5:31:40 AM PST by Genoa (Put the kettle on!)
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To: Mayr Fortuna

We are having great difficulty with Barry Barrack and Barrak.


9 posted on 01/09/2011 5:32:08 AM PST by bushpilot1
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Hmmmm.

I’ll treat this as a serious question.

Generally, the double consanant is employed to preserve the short vowel sound preceeding it. If a vowel is followed by a consonant and another vowel, it takes the long sound of the vowel (when two vowels go walking, they play a little game. The last vowel is silent, the first says it’s own name.) and the second is not sounded.

An example is found by the word “rap”. It means to hit something, like knocking on a door and is synonymous with “tap”. If it is an on-going action we give it an “-ing” suffix. However, to preserve the vowel sound we must double the “p”, thus “rapping.”

If we didn’t double the “p” the “a” would be sounded with the long sound, making the word “raping”. That has a different meaning entirely.

Hope this helps.


10 posted on 01/09/2011 5:32:17 AM PST by Jemian (War Eagle, no matter what!)
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To: nagdt

Thank you for being kind.


11 posted on 01/09/2011 5:33:08 AM PST by netmilsmom (Happiness is a choice.)
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To: Mayr Fortuna
This looks like a helpful place
12 posted on 01/09/2011 5:34:27 AM PST by sonofagun (Some think my cynicism grows with age. I like to think of it as wisdom!)
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To: Mayr Fortuna

why the English language is so hard to learn:

> 1) The bandage was wound around the wound.

> 2) The farm was used to produce produce.

> 3) The dump was so full that it had to refuse more refuse.

> 4) We must polish the Polish furniture.

> 5) He could lead if he would get the lead out.

> 6) The soldier decided to desert his dessert in the desert.

> 7) Since there is no time like the present, he thought it was time
to present the present.

> 8) A bass was painted on the head of the bass drum.

> 9) When shot at, the dove dove into the bushes.

> 10) I did not object to the object.

> 11) The insurance was invalid for the invalid.

> 12) There was a row among the oarsmen about how to row.

> 13) They were too close to the door to close it.

> 14) The buck does funny things when the does are present.

> 15) A seamstress and a sewer fell down into a sewer line.

> 16) To help with planting, the farmer taught his sow to sow.

> 17) The wind was too strong to wind the sail.

> 18) After a number of injections my jaw got number.

> 19) Upon seeing the tear in the painting I shed a tear.

> 20) I had to subject the subject to a series of tests.

> 21) How can I intimate this to my most intimate friend?

> English: interesting language.

> There is no egg in eggplant nor ham in hamburger; neither apple nor

> pine in pineapple. English muffins weren’t invented in England or

> french fries in France. Sweetmeats are candies while sweetbreads,

> which aren’t sweet, are meat. We take English for granted. But if we

> explore its paradoxes, we find that quicksand can work slowly, boxing

> rings are square and a guinea pig is neither from Guinea nor is it a

> pig. And why is it that writers write but fingers don’t fing,

> grocers don’t groce and hammers don’t ham?

>

> If the plural of tooth is teeth,

> why isn’t the plural of booth beeth?

> One goose, 2 geese. So one moose, 2 meese?

> One index, 2 indices?

>

> Doesn’t it seem crazy that you can make amends but not one amend? If

> you have a bunch of odds and ends and get rid of all but one of them,

> what do you call it? If teachers taught, why didn’t preachers praught?

> If a vegetarian eats vegetables, what does a humanitarian eat?

> In what language do people recite at a play and play at a recital?

> Ship by truck and send cargo by ship?

> Have noses that run and feet that smell?

> How can a slim chance and a fat chance be the same, while a wise man and

> a wise guy are opposites?

> house can burn up as it burns down, in which you fill in a form by

> filling it out and in which, an alarm goes off by going on.

> People, not computers invented English, and it reflects the creativity

> of the human race, which, of course, is not a race at all. That is why,

> when the stars are out, they are visible, but when the lights are out,

> they are invisible.

> P.S.

> Why doesn’t “buick” rhyme with “quick”?


13 posted on 01/09/2011 5:37:14 AM PST by patriot08 (TEXAS GAL- born and bred and proud of it!)
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To: Mayr Fortuna
/smartass

Start here for quick reference:
http://spelling.wordpress.com/2007/04/15/basic-spelling-rules-double-the-final-consonant-rule/

Further resources via this search result:
http://www.google.com/search?q=rule+for+double+consonants

14 posted on 01/09/2011 5:38:04 AM PST by tomkat
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To: Mayr Fortuna; Jemian
I do have great difficulty with the double letters in words, as pp, ll, ss and so on...

Can you help me with a rule?

OK, I'll bite. Jemian is right.

Double consonents such as "pp" are usually preceded by a short vowel sound. For example, supper. We had rice and beans for supper.

Single consonents such as "p" are usually preceded by a long vowel sound. For example, super. Super man can fly through the air.

Another example: Feathers are a filler for pillows. The office manager needs a filer to store his folders.

15 posted on 01/09/2011 5:39:04 AM PST by matt1234 (0bama's bunker phase: Nov. 2010 - Jan. 2013)
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To: Jemian

Flash back to “grammar” school. Still makes my head hurt. The “rules” drove me crazy, especially because there were so many exceptions. For an A.R. type, it was pure heck. I before E EXCEPT after C. Yea, right. That sure makes sense.


16 posted on 01/09/2011 5:39:04 AM PST by Gadsden1st
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Back in elementary and high school we were given a lot of “rules” for spelling and pronunciation. It seems every rule had an exception. I still have a problem with spelling, if not for spellcheck I’d be lost. English is one of the most difficult languages to learn, maybe because it’s a composite of several languages. Spelling and pronunciation is dependant to a large extent on which language the word came from.
My only advise is to speak English as much as possible with native English speakers – and be aware that British and American English is not the same. When it comes to spelling, read a dictionary as much as possible.


17 posted on 01/09/2011 5:39:46 AM PST by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Don’t worry some of us make misstakes all the time.

Reading through the misstakes is a useful talent.


18 posted on 01/09/2011 5:43:05 AM PST by Marty62 (Marty 60)
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To: self
oops .. /html rust

Start here for quick reference:
double-the-final-consonant-rule

Further resources via this search result:
rule+for+double+consonants

19 posted on 01/09/2011 5:44:38 AM PST by tomkat
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To: patriot08

You may not have been as helpful as you intended.

LLOTF


20 posted on 01/09/2011 5:45:29 AM PST by Delta 21 (If you cant tell if I'm being sarcastic...maybe I'm not.)
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To: patriot08

And spelling – I was trying to help a young lady learn English. She thought I was messing with her when I told her how to pronounce “telephone”. When she sounded it out she said “tele pa ho ne”.


21 posted on 01/09/2011 5:45:41 AM PST by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
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To: patriot08

ROFL, thanks for that.


22 posted on 01/09/2011 5:49:40 AM PST by TheZMan (Just secede and get it over with. No love lost on either side. Cya.)
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Well, honey, we all have trouble with him.


23 posted on 01/09/2011 5:50:09 AM PST by ruesrose (It's possible to be clueless without being blonde.)
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Well, honey, we all have trouble with him.


24 posted on 01/09/2011 5:50:09 AM PST by ruesrose (It's possible to be clueless without being blonde.)
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To: R. Scott
“tele pa ho ne”.

The Hawaiian pronunciation?
25 posted on 01/09/2011 5:51:31 AM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: patriot08
Why doesn’t “buick” rhyme with “quick”?

For the same reason boot doesn't rhyme with foot.

If you ever figure it out, let me know. 58 years old and still wondering about my native language. It does keep crossword puzzles interesting because you can never be sure which pronunciation/meaning of a word is being used.

26 posted on 01/09/2011 5:55:35 AM PST by trebb ("If a man will not work, he should not eat" From 2 Thes 3)
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To: Mayr Fortuna
used bone induction

I had better shut up now....

where are the zot kitties???

27 posted on 01/09/2011 5:56:01 AM PST by Vaquero (BHO....'The Pretenda from Kenya')
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To: Mayr Fortuna

28 posted on 01/09/2011 5:59:09 AM PST by csvset
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To: R. Scott

As an example of how much our language has changed over the years, read Washington’s Rules of Civility (1744)

>>11th Shift not yourself in the Sight of others nor Gnaw your nails.

12th Shake not the head, Feet, or Legs rowl not the Eys lift not one eyebrow higher than the other wry not the mouth, and bedew no mans face with your Spittle, by approaching too near him when you Speak.

13th Kill no Vermin as Fleas, lice ticks &c in the Sight of Others, if you See any filth or thick Spittle put your foot Dexteriously upon it if it be upon the Cloths of your Companions, Put it off privately, and if it be upon your own Cloths return Thanks to him who puts it off.<<<

http://www.revolutionary-war-and-beyond.com/rules-of-civility-by-george-washington-1744.html


29 posted on 01/09/2011 5:59:51 AM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: patriot08
Hey friend?

It indeed is amazingly amusing isn´t it?

30 posted on 01/09/2011 6:05:55 AM PST by Mayr Fortuna
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Comment #31 Removed by Moderator

To: R. Scott
The peculiarities of the English language don't bother me and probably because I did so much book reading as a child, I never had much of a problem with spelling and using similarly pronounced words in the proper manner (i.e, their, there).

However, what throws me off is when we try to incorporate foreign words into our language. An amusing example for me is hors d'oeuvres which means appetizers in English. Well because I read the word in books and never heard how it is pronounced, I always figured it was pronounced like "Whores Dovers". So in my younger years when I mentioned we were having Whores Dovers at a party I was having, everybody figured that prostitutes would be there instead of scallops wrapped in bacon.

After that experience, it always did annoy me to see people dropping foreign words into their conversations. I think they do that to come across as "classy" and "educated" but they should really just stick to using English words and leave those fancy sounding words in Europe where they belong.

32 posted on 01/09/2011 6:14:38 AM PST by SamAdams76
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To: Vaquero
Yeeeesss... Bone Induction indeed...

Never heard of it? It was a late scientific technique developed in USA and sold for us in Brazil as the "most amazing scientific new discover" and by the time I was a kid 15 yo. only that was crediting science a lot...

Anyway, I was young, credulous and eager to learn, and that was when I begun learning English, which I am proud to know a bit and be able to read and exchange with some of you...

33 posted on 01/09/2011 6:29:34 AM PST by Mayr Fortuna
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To: tomkat
Funny isn´t it? http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b98/17837/smoker.gif
34 posted on 01/09/2011 6:31:05 AM PST by Mayr Fortuna
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To: Mayr Fortuna
Sim. Lhe vou ajudar. A única coisa que realmente vai ajudar é ler, e ler, e mais ler. Não ha muitas reglas universais porque o inglês vem de vários idiomas. Uma regla que descreve as regularidades de uma parte não aplica a outras (por exemplo, um adjetivo que termina com -ful, quase nunca tem doble ll, mas muitas palavras terminam com doble ll e outros consoantes dobles--pode visitar este sitio). Sim, pode aprender todas estas reglas limitadas ou pode gastar o tempo lendo inglês para ver como e quando se usa para expresar um imagem ou pensamento. Comeca com algo interesante como os livros de Stephen King: The Talisman, Needful Things, Desperation, The Drawing of the Three. E se você quer ver um website com muitos exemplos de ortografia má, você já tem chegado.
35 posted on 01/09/2011 6:33:48 AM PST by aruanan
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To: Mayr Fortuna

Yes, very.


36 posted on 01/09/2011 6:35:13 AM PST by patriot08 (TEXAS GAL- born and bred and proud of it!)
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To: patriot08

I read your comment; I hope others read it also.


37 posted on 01/09/2011 7:31:48 AM PST by PoloSec ( Believe how that Christ died for our sins, was buried and rose again the 3rd day)
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To: patriot08

Ref post #13.

Thank you for sharing. I really enjoyed it.


38 posted on 01/09/2011 8:32:51 AM PST by Gatún(CraigIsaMangoTreeLawyer)
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To: Mayr Fortuna
The Rule:

“If the word has a suffix but a single consonant followed by a vowel drop the vowel and double the consonant except in words that have two or more syllables and one of the double letters would be sounded with the second syllable if the word had no suffix. If the word has two more syllables and the last single consonant would NOT be sounded with the second or last syllable then double that last consonant and drop the last vowel before adding the suffix UNLESS there is only one syllable in the word and it has a double consonant and NO vowel, in which case simply add the suffix. There are exceptions to this simple rule and they are many.
For example, “piling vs. pilling” and slang words and words of foreign origin.
The above applies in cases of vowel SOUNDS following the second con........

Just use Spellcheck and take your chances.

39 posted on 01/09/2011 8:52:39 AM PST by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
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To: SamAdams76

I learned to read at an early age. My parents taught me to read before kindergarten. I never had a problem with such words as To, Two and Too. But my spelling has always been terrible. As you notice my grammar still needs some help.


40 posted on 01/09/2011 1:40:26 PM PST by R. Scott (Humanity i love you because when you're hard up you pawn your Intelligence to buy a drink)
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