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Oscar nominations 2011: Academy Award season is here (list of nominees)
Star-Ledger ^ | 01/25/2011 | Anthony Venutolo

Posted on 01/25/2011 9:17:25 AM PST by SeekAndFind

The nominees for the 83rd Academy Awards were announced live this morning in Beverly Hills, California. They were read by Academy President Tom Sherak and last year's Best Supporting Actress winner, Mo'Nique.

The British monarchy saga "The King's Speech" led the pack for this year's Academy Awards with 12 nominations, including best picture and acting honors for Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter and Geoffrey Rush.

The Coen brothers' western remake of "True Grit" snagged 10 nominations, just ahead of "The Social Network," David Fincher's Facebook drama which racked up eight.

Entertainment's most esteemed award ceremony will take place from the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood. Actor James Franco and actress Anne Hathaway will be co-hosting the event, which will be the first time for each. The Oscars will be televised Sunday, February 27 on ABC at 8 p.m..

Here is the list of major nominees:

Best Picture

Black Swan

The Fighter

Inception

The Kids Are All Right

The King's Speech

127 Hours

The Social Network

Toy Story 3

True Grit

Winter's Bone

(Excerpt) Read more at nj.com ...


TOPICS: Arts/Photography; Music/Entertainment; Society; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: 2011; academyawards; oscars
For the complete list of Nominees, click here
1 posted on 01/25/2011 9:17:30 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

It’s a shame they passed over the kid who played the Facebook CFO in “The Social Network” for best supporting actor. He was great.


2 posted on 01/25/2011 9:18:48 AM PST by MissesBush
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To: SeekAndFind

The King’s Speech should clean up.


3 posted on 01/25/2011 9:20:25 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: SeekAndFind

Some major nominees....


Actor in a Leading Role

Javier Bardem in “Biutiful”

Jeff Bridges in “True Grit”

Jesse Eisenberg in “The Social Network”

Colin Firth in “The King’s Speech”

James Franco in “127 Hours”


Actor in a Supporting Role

Christian Bale in “The Fighter”

John Hawkes in “Winter’s Bone”

Jeremy Renner in “The Town”

Mark Ruffalo in “The Kids Are All Right”

Geoffrey Rush in “The King’s Speech”


Actress in a Leading Role

Annette Bening in “The Kids Are All Right”

Nicole Kidman in “Rabbit Hole”

Jennifer Lawrence in “Winter’s Bone”

Natalie Portman in “Black Swan”

Michelle Williams in “Blue Valentine”


Actress in a Supporting Role

Amy Adams in “The Fighter”

Helena Bonham Carter in “The King’s Speech”

Melissa Leo in “The Fighter”

Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit”

Jacki Weaver in “Animal Kingdom”


Animated Feature Film

“How to Train Your Dragon” Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois

“The Illusionist” Sylvain Chomet

“Toy Story 3” Lee Unkrich


Directing

“Black Swan” Darren Aronofsky

“The Fighter” David O. Russell

“The King’s Speech” Tom Hooper

“The Social Network” David Fincher

“True Grit” Joel Coen and Ethan Coen


Writing (Original Screenplay)

“Another Year” Written by Mike Leigh

“The Fighter” Screenplay by Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson;

Story by Keith Dorrington & Paul Tamasy & Eric Johnson

“Inception” Written by Christopher Nolan

“The Kids Are All Right” Written by Lisa Cholodenko & Stuart Blumberg

“The King’s Speech” Screenplay by David Seidler


4 posted on 01/25/2011 9:21:17 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind
Back in the day it was "how many of these best picture nominees have I seen?"

Now it's "how many of these nominees have I heard of?"

5 posted on 01/25/2011 9:21:17 AM PST by GSWarrior (Businessmen are more trustworthy than preachers, professors and politicians.)
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To: SeekAndFind; Perdogg; DollyCali; EveningStar; Borges; Mr. K; Blondie; altura; mylife; Mama_Bear; ...

And the Oscar goes to ______________

Cinema

Post here or FR Mail DollyCali or Perdogg
to be added or dropped from this ping list.

If you are receiving this I put you on my list,
no doubt w/o your permission..
so it is okay if you want to dive out


This is who I have on my newly "throw together from memory" list.

Perdogg;DollyCali; evening star; borges; Mrk; blondie; altura; mylife; Mama-bear; jackdeth; Dr. Scarpetta; starman417; wtc911; swmobuffalo; rummyfan; tax-chick; LS; JoeProBono; joe6 pack; MHGinTN; re_nortex ; trisham ;Yorlik803; patriot08; hattend;Clara Lou; Ruy Dias de Bivar ;Ricebug;

6 posted on 01/25/2011 9:23:09 AM PST by DollyCali (Don't tell God how big your storm is... tell your storm how BIG your God is!)
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To: dfwgator

RE: The King’s Speech should clean up.

They were bypassed at the Golden Globes in favor of the Social Network. The only win for the King’s Speech at the Golden Globe was Colin Firth for Best Actor.

I remember Steven Spielberg’s THE COLOR PURPLE ( starring Whoopi Goldberg and Oprah Winfrey ) was nominated for 11 Oscars in 1985 but DID NOT WIN ANYTHING that year.


7 posted on 01/25/2011 9:24:20 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: GSWarrior

Aint’ it the truth! I know who Bridges is and don’t care who the rest are.


8 posted on 01/25/2011 9:24:22 AM PST by Terry Mross (I voted for McCain and WASTED my vote.)
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To: SeekAndFind

It would be a damn shame, although it would be a perfect sign of the times, having a film about the narcissists who started Facebook, win out over a story about triumphing over adversity.


9 posted on 01/25/2011 9:26:23 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: SeekAndFind

The Golden Globes best picture usually isn’t the Oscar Best Picture. “The King’s Speech” just won the best produced movie from Producers Guild of America which also happened to be the Oscar Best Picture for the last 3 years in a row.

So it has a very good chance right now of being Best Picture


10 posted on 01/25/2011 9:34:38 AM PST by CaptainK (...please make it stop. Shake a can of pennies at it.)
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To: GSWarrior

“Now it’s ‘how many of these nominees have I heard of?’”

Partly, this is due to the current reign of mindless sequels, prequels, reboots, adaptations, and so forth that dominate the “tentpole” pictures, which I happen to agree wityh the critical community are with few exceptions (Toy Story 3, The Dark Knight, etc.) worth forgetting. Their penchant for the old “indie” feel isn’t quite for me, and I resent the academy and critics endlessly honoring it.

Perhaps, though, they have no choice. I’d honor a great middlebrow movie like Back To the Future over pretentious one which no one will watch in five years, like for instance Secrets and Lies, The Thin Red Line, The Pianist, Lost in Translation, or Babel. Problem is, Transformers, The A-Team, and Tron are not Back To the Future.

That being said, this is not a particularly bad year. Inception and Toy Story 3 were juggernauts, and The Social Network and True Grit were respectable hits. Of course, if there weren’t now 10 best picture nominees there’s no way Inception and Toy Story 3’d be up there, which kinda makes it feel like a consolation prize.


11 posted on 01/25/2011 9:40:01 AM PST by Tublecane
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To: Tublecane
Inception would be up there. It was the best movie I saw last year.

I also thought the Thin Red Line was one of the greatest war movies ever made. Came out the same year as Saving Private Ryan unfortunately, but I liked Thin Red Line better.

12 posted on 01/25/2011 9:47:53 AM PST by GunRunner (10 Years of Freeping...)
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To: SeekAndFind

Colin Firth and the King’s Speech — it was excellent and deserves every Oscar.


13 posted on 01/25/2011 9:51:32 AM PST by Moonmad27 ("I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way." Jessica Rabbit)
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To: dfwgator

“It would be a damn shame, although it would be a perfect sign of the times, having a film about the narcissists who started Facebook, win out over a story about triumphing over adversity.”

Firstly, just because the movie is about a narcissist (or someone with narcissistic tendencies) doesn’t mean it celebrated narcissism. Actually, the main character was sort of the villain. Secondly, at least he was a self-made man. And though his product was unecessary and perhaps socially destructive (not that people were getting along in the old fashioned way beforehand), it was what the people wanted. He’s a true entreprenuer.

The King, on the other hand, is a useful figure for the culture in which he lived. We don’t need one, but the British are used to it. Anyway, if you’re going to have a king, he’s the sort you’d want, from what little I know. In the very least he was a triumph compared to his predecessor. However, is anyone going to seriously argue his role was necessary when you had Churchill to make speeches for you? Does anyone outside of rabid royalists study his speeches—or his life as a whole, for that matter?

Aside from the general overemphasis on politics, there is the old aristocratic bias at work here. I, for one, think it’s perfectly okay for a Horatio Alger story (if characters in Alger stories were pricks who struck it rich making superficial trinkets) to win over a silver spoon story. Then again, The King’s Speech also has Geoffrey Rush’s character, so maybe I’m talking out my rear.


14 posted on 01/25/2011 9:54:20 AM PST by Tublecane
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To: GunRunner

“I also thought the Thin Red Line was one of the greatest war movies ever made. Came out the same year as Saving Private Ryan unfortunately, but I liked Thin Red Line better.”

That’s fine, and certainly I love plenty of obscure movies myself. But you must admit that it’s not for a general audience (lacking—what do you call it?—oh yeah, a plot). It also bombed at the box office and has not since become part of the cannon (that is, very few watch it anymore). It fits the point to which I was responding: namely, that the Academy Awards have a tradition of rewarding obscure titles.

I included it in the list because of my special hate for Terence Malick; anmy number of other films could’ve taken its place.


15 posted on 01/25/2011 10:00:12 AM PST by Tublecane
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To: Tublecane

Most of my favorite recent have been foreign films, I still can’t think of any recent Hollywood film that was better than “The Lives of Others.”


16 posted on 01/25/2011 10:05:45 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: GSWarrior

Agreed. I haven’t heard of most of these movies. Haven’t heard of some of the actors and actresses either.

I wonder what the ratings will be for the Oscars. Will middle America sit through a 3 to 4 hour show about movies they don’t care about?

Many of these movies did poorly at the box office, so I’m thinking that many people don’t know and don’t care if the movies they haven’t seen win awards.


17 posted on 01/25/2011 10:07:01 AM PST by Dilbert San Diego
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To: Tublecane; Moonmad27
Was looking forward to King's Speech until I read Hitchens' write up about it.

Apparently its royalist Hollywood revisionism. The royals had a policy of appeasement but to this day can claim they stood by Britain it its "finest hour" due to clever marketing.

Oh well, Braveheart was a mess of historical propaganda, but I can still enjoy it from time to time.

18 posted on 01/25/2011 10:11:17 AM PST by GunRunner (10 Years of Freeping...)
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To: dfwgator

King’s Speech was good, not great. But the acting was strong. Firth is a lock for Best Actor.

Loved True Grit. Didn’t see Social Network, The Fighter or Black Swan.

Toy Story 3 and Inception were great.

All in all, a ho-hum year for movies.


19 posted on 01/25/2011 10:11:21 AM PST by Retired Greyhound
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To: Tublecane
I think people probably watch it frequently. Don't know for sure, but it deserved a nomination.

The plot was a historical retelling of soldiers' experiences on Guadalcanal with internal monologues. A traditional plot like your average 'guys on a mission' flick would've missed the point. Put it this way, I could watch Thin Red Line with the sound off and enjoy it better than 90% of the other crap that's out there.

What caused your special hatred for Terrence Malick?

I saw Days of Heaven about a month ago, and wasn't blown away with the story but could certainly see why people went crazy over the cinematography at the time.

That's kind of the point with a Malick film. Criticizing his films for not having a traditional plot is like criticizing expressionist paintings for not being realistic.

20 posted on 01/25/2011 10:21:23 AM PST by GunRunner (10 Years of Freeping...)
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To: dfwgator

Good call on “The Lives of Others”. Amazing movie.

My only problem with it...it was total BS. There are NO known reports of this kind of Stasi goodwill.

But if one can overlook that, it was a fantastic movie that touched on every possible emotion.


21 posted on 01/25/2011 10:22:15 AM PST by Retired Greyhound
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To: GunRunner

A lot of people hated the Thin Red Line, just because Sean Penn was in it. His part was relatively small, the real “star” of the movie was Jim Caviezel, from “Passion of the Christ.”

I was quite a good film, IMHO, of course movies about the Pacific War, are much different than the ones about the European theater. The two were as different as night and day, as far as fighting conditions.


22 posted on 01/25/2011 10:25:13 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: Retired Greyhound
Good call on “The Lives of Others”. Amazing movie. My only problem with it...it was total BS. There are NO known reports of this kind of Stasi goodwill. But if one can overlook that, it was a fantastic movie that touched on every possible emotion.

The other movie that's one of my all-time favorites is "Goodbye, Lenin." A bit farcical, but in the end, it becomes a movie about the bond between mother and son.

23 posted on 01/25/2011 10:28:42 AM PST by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator

“I still can’t think of any recent Hollywood film that was better than ‘The Lives of Others.’”

I loved that one. Incidentally, I think I heard that William F. Buckley named it one of his favorites shortly before passing.


24 posted on 01/25/2011 10:46:51 AM PST by Tublecane
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To: GunRunner

“The plot was a historical retelling of soldiers’ experiences on Guadalcanal with internal monologues. A traditional plot like your average ‘guys on a mission’ flick would’ve missed the point”

You’re confusing a short summary of the story with plot, which consists of a sequence of events that usually form the cause-and-effect of a story. Usually, scenes relate to one another and are laid out in a discernable pattern. And though occassionally discreet parts of The Thin Red Line make sense in isolation, the movie as a whole can be said to have no plot because the parts don’t fit together in any recognizable manner. Or at least in a manner that amounts to something more than random soldiers’ memories which happened to take place in the same battle.

“What caused your special hatred for Terrence Malick?”

I don’t normally advocate comparing serious things to pornography, but Malick’s style has been called “scenery porn.” That’s all his movies amount to, in my opinion: they look good. Which is why, no doubt, you say, “I could watch Thin Red Line with the sound off.” I could probably also watch some of my favorite movies with the sound off, but it would never occur to me to do so because, unlike with Malick, I get something out of the other elements.

That’d be okay, if that’s all people wanted. But his movies are held up as masterpieces, and he a genius. I require more. Little things like plot, theme, character, and dialogue. All he manages is setting and perhaps symbolism (though Lord knows what they’re symbolic of).

“That’s kind of the point with a Malick film. Criticizing his films for not having a traditional plot is like criticizing expressionist paintings for not being realistic.”

It’s perfectly appropriate to criticize non-representative art for not representing things if the former is being held up as every bit as good as representative art and you think differently. I wouldn’t go out of my way to damn, for instance, Islamic mosaics or graphic advertising. They serve their own purposes. It is only in the contex of what constitutes high art that I’d rail against them.

Likewise, I speak in the context of The Thin Red Line being nominated for Best Picture and Malick being hailed as a filmmaking genius. Film is a narrative form. In my opinion, a movie cannot be great if it looks good and has a bad story, every bit as much as a good story can overcome the worst possible direction.

The very fact that it’s “kind of the point with a Malick film” that the cinematography and nothing else is great is exactly the problem.


25 posted on 01/25/2011 11:08:43 AM PST by Tublecane
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To: SeekAndFind

Inception ?
Geez, that’s one of the suckiest movies I’ve ever seen.


26 posted on 01/25/2011 11:28:54 AM PST by BuffaloJack (Re-Elect President Sarah Palin 2016)
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To: SeekAndFind

Somehow like the Nobel Peace Prize - who really cares anymore?


27 posted on 01/25/2011 11:41:59 AM PST by Moltke (Always retaliate first.)
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To: Tublecane
I disagree. Film can be whatever you make of it, and it's primarily a visual art more than a narrative one.

I thought that I learned more about the characters in the TTRL through the flashbacks and internal monologue than any of the stereotypically clichéd characters in Saving Private Ryan, and while the so-called story might have been thin, I wouldn't call it 'bad'.

Good visuals impress me, things like natural light, non-CG action, conservative use of screen smoke, and backlighting are all really hard to get right. The best parts of movies like 2001 and Apocalypse Now, or Schindler's List in my mind are the parts where nothing is said for minutes at a time.

Malick and his DPs do it better than anyone, and he constructs stories that are more akin to poetry rather than prose. The cool thing is that just by watching five minutes of one of his movies you can see his style, and tell you're in a Malick movie. It reminds me of how you can tell you're in a Robert Altman movie just by the little things like the crosstalk between different character conversations. It's his style, and it's not for everyone, but I can see why people call him a genius because in many ways, what he does with the camera is genius. But people are also aware of his shortcomings as a filmmaker when it comes to budget and schedule. I think it took him something like three years to edit Days of Heaven, which is ridiculous.

I thought it odd that you mentioned hating Malick films, just because he's not clogging up the theater with a new film every other year. In fact I think he's only directed four or five films in the past 40 years.

I'm looking forward to The Tree of Life, not just because it was filmed nearby in central Texas, but because looking at the previews I can tell that it will be something beautiful to look at.

28 posted on 01/25/2011 11:50:10 AM PST by GunRunner (10 Years of Freeping...)
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To: Tublecane

I heard about the King’s Speech while in London. Having enjoyed the Imperial War Museum and its incredible exhibits on that era, including that speech, the movie really reminded me of all they went through. Just wish I’d seen it there — to walk out of the theater and be right where it took place!


29 posted on 01/25/2011 12:27:09 PM PST by Moonmad27 ("I'm not bad, I'm just drawn that way." Jessica Rabbit)
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To: GSWarrior
Now it's "how many of these nominees have I heard of?"

One you never heard of before is Hailee Steinfeld in “True Grit.” She carries the picture but was only 13 years old and never had been in a movie before. She was chosen out of 15,000 applicants -- the Coen brothers, Bridges and Matt Damon have nothing but praise at her acting, especially the stilted dialog. Much, much better than Kim Darby in the 1969 original.

30 posted on 01/25/2011 12:38:55 PM PST by CedarDave (What is DADT? Obama's response when inquiries are made about his birth certificate.)
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To: DollyCali

hi there! please add me to your list.
thanks


31 posted on 01/25/2011 12:46:11 PM PST by warsaw44
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To: DollyCali

Please add me to your ping list.


32 posted on 01/25/2011 12:51:00 PM PST by ColdOne (Government "help" to business is just as disastrous as government persecution...Ayn Rand)
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To: SeekAndFind

“The King’s Speech” has taken off at the box office since the Golden Globes.

The Academy loves to reward “art” films that actually make money. This film is gonna clean up at the Oscars, starting with Colin Firth as Best Actor.

(And it’s a really good movie.)


33 posted on 01/25/2011 1:05:10 PM PST by Blue Ink
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To: ColdOne; warsaw44

I have added you both. Welcome!


34 posted on 01/25/2011 1:29:23 PM PST by DollyCali (Don't tell God how big your storm is... tell your storm how BIG your God is!)
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To: CedarDave

Kim Darby was pretty wooden in the original, IIRC.


35 posted on 01/25/2011 2:21:27 PM PST by GSWarrior (Businessmen are more trustworthy than preachers, professors and politicians.)
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To: SeekAndFind
The Kids Are All Right

Cool. I love The Who!

36 posted on 01/25/2011 2:22:25 PM PST by GSWarrior (Businessmen are more trustworthy than preachers, professors and politicians.)
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To: GunRunner

“Film can be whatever you make of it”

Can’t really argue with that, but I’m just gonna say, “No.”

“it’s primarily a visual art more than a narrative one”

While it is true that non-narrative films exist. Random images have been strung together for extended periods of time without any intention for them to be interpreted as telling a story. However, the sort of films that people actually go see, the ones people care about, the ones that live on as more than elaborate but disposable art projects, the ones that are usually up for Oscars, have stories.

The Thin Red Line is supposed to be one of those movies, obviously. It has a well known background with a story of its own (Guadalcanal), characters, dialogue, and various scenes and sequences which, when you ignore how they’re supposed to fiot together as a whole, do actually tell a story. I understand why Malick’s unorthodox style of delivering the story appeals to people. No one wants every movie experience to be the same. And expecially if the visuals are inarguably masterful, what an opportunity to praise something different.

Except it’s not just different. It’s bad. It tells the story badly. As proof I offer my complete inability to remember what the story was. No point arguing now that film isn’t a narrative medium, since as we know, and as I’ve demonstrated, this particular movie was supposed to tell a story of some sort.

Now, it never would be my position that every movie has to be the same. And certainly, plenty of directors have gotten away scott free from having to follow every conventional rule of storytelling. I’m not saying Hitchcock, Tarantino, Lynch, Peckinpah, P.T. Anderson, or John Waters should have been exiled from the industry. What I am saying is that Malick is a particular offender. Much worse than most, in that not only do his movies break storytelling conventions, they barely even have stories.

By the way, there’s a popular saying that movies should tell a story with pictures, not words. I agree. Mostly, that is. There’s nothing wrong with some exposition. Anyway, the point is even that dictum appreciates that the story is the important thing. It only argues over the best means of presenting a story, not whether or not a story should be told.

“I thought that I learned more about the characters in the TTRL through the flashbacks and internal monologue than any of the stereotypically clichéd characters in Saving Private Ryan”

If Cusack (the green young officer), Nolte (the calous, egotistic, battle-hardened commander), and Caviezel (the stranger in a strange land cloudlander) weren’t clichéd I’ll eat my hat. And when you say you learned about the characters, I suppose I should say that my previous criticism about The Thin Red Line’s characterization is not so much that they are poorly drawn. They are not cyphers, nor are they impenetrable. Indeed, the moment Caviezel, Cusack, or Nolte (for instance) come on screen you know exactly what to expect.

No, my problem is in the character development, or lackthereof. This relates back to the lack of plot. I couldn’t say that they weren’t at all developed. To the film’s credit among some, it is done in, again, an unorthodox manner. That is, mostly by staring at scenery (once again, Malick’s strength). We think we know them when all is over because we’ve heard voice-overs and seen flashbacks that look like fabric softener commercials.

The problem for me is that they’re not developed in a dramatically compelling manner. Nor in a particularly comprehensible manner, by which I mean in a manner through which the audience can afterwards look back and realize why they did what they did, and what it was that changed about them. Somehow grass blowing in the wind and white puffy clouds don’t accomplish as much as characters coming into conflict with eachother or outside elements. Occasionally drama occurs, as in what stands for me as the most memorable scene. That is, when Nolte yells at Cusack. Other things happen, but mostly nothing happens.

By the way, comparing them to the characters in Saving Private Ryan is bad form. No one—or not me, at least—ever said that was a paragon of dramatic virtue. It will be remembered as the great war movie from ‘98. But that’s for the striking opening sequence; relaunching the WWII genre; and the influential gritty, shakey-cam psuedo-documentary style. Only two characters were dramatically compelling: Tom Hanks, for being genuinely mysterious; and Jeremy Davies, who despite my wanting to punch him in the face actually changed as a person during the movie. So did Ryan himself at the end, I suppose. But he was so disappointing and superfluous (as a character, not a plot device) up to that point that I’d rather forget him.

Aside from those two, Saving Private Ryan was comprised of cardboard cutouts, yes. However, it wasn’t a character-driven story. It was plot-driven. Unlike The Thin Red Line, it had plot to spare, and that’s basically why people preferred it. There was a clear goal from the beginning, with plenty of self-contained adventures in the middle. once they got to Ryan the plot shifted, but the importance of bridges had been previously established. As had the group’s continuing responsiblity to the rest of the army, as demonstrated in earlier assault on the machine gun nest.

It was basically the same plot in the third act anyway, in that they went on protecting Ryan. And not just Ryan, but the U.S. war effort, Free Europe, and Democracy, which made it all the more dramatic. There’s nothing approaching that in The Thin Red Line. We don’t even get an inkling what Guadalcanal is about, for pete’s sake.

Saving Private Ryan had its flaws, most notably the weird “FUBAR”/”what the heck are we fighting for?” theme. This was supposedly answered by the figure of Ryan, whose safe journey home was supposed to secure their safe journey home. So the point of the war was to get home? You’re fighting against Nazis, isn’t that enough? At some point, though, Ryan wasn’t the what they’re fighting for. Because they abandoned—or at least gravely risked—his safety to protect the bridge. But then he was their reason again, because Tom Hanks said “Earn this,” and Ryan asked his family if he’s a good man. Idiot, Tom Hanks didn’t die for you, he died for the bridge! What the heck is going on?

As you can see, at least there’s something to argue about with Private Ryan. The plot, characters, and theme were confused, but at least they were interacting. With The Thin Red Line, I can perhaps say Nolte was too much of a hard ass and Caviezel had his head too much in the clouds. But, again, that’s superficial. If only they had done things, things which did or didn’t hold together to make a whole movie, I could talk about them more.


37 posted on 01/25/2011 2:48:24 PM PST by Tublecane
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To: CedarDave

“the Coen brothers, Bridges and Matt Damon have nothing but praise at her acting, especially the stilted dialog”

That’s an odd way of putting it. The Coen Brothers dialogue is strange, but I wouldn’t exactly call it stilted. That’s the way it would read, I suppose. But the way it’s delivered is usually very funny and appropriate in context, if appearing weird and unnatural from the outside.

Or maybe that’s what you mean, it would be “stilted” without being delivered with care, which could be to the actress’ credit. I always figured the Coens themselves pretty well controlled their actors’ speech, like the way they control their camera angles. That is, given the how similar have been the performances across their ouvre.

Some actors especially excel at it, like John Goodman and Jeff Bridges, which is probably why they’ve made multiple appearances. I don’t know if this actress is one of them, or one of the various other people who have wafted in and out of Coen Brothers movies. Nominating her may just be a way of indirectly nominating them.


38 posted on 01/25/2011 2:58:43 PM PST by Tublecane
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To: Tublecane

“Nolte (the calous, egotistic, battle-hardened commander)”

I just realized that he was exactly the opposite of battle-hardened; he said something about having had to wait for his war. I guess that makes him a former arm-chair commander suddenly thrust into reality, which makes him like Himmelstoss in All Quiet on the Western Front. Still callous, but now we add no more experienced than the underlings he barks orders to, which makes him arbitrary and hypocritical as well.


39 posted on 01/25/2011 3:03:54 PM PST by Tublecane
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To: Tublecane
“the Coen brothers, Bridges and Matt Damon have nothing but praise at her acting, especially the stilted dialog”

Maybe "stilted" is not the best word to use; but it follows the dialog in the book which was formal, almost archaic. And she nailed it. I wouldn't be surprised if she takes the Oscar.

40 posted on 01/25/2011 3:35:20 PM PST by CedarDave (What is DADT? Obama's response when inquiries are made about his birth certificate.)
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To: Tublecane
No one wants every movie experience to be the same. And expecially if the visuals are inarguably masterful, what an opportunity to praise something different.

Except it’s not just different. It’s bad. It tells the story badly.

To quote Jules Winnfield, "Look my friend, this is just where me and you differ."

I also think we need to weed out the difference in not liking The Thin Red Line and not liking Malick's style as a whole.

As to the first argument, I prefer The Thin Red Line because it shows, in a fantastic and visually intoxicating style, the internal and individual experiences of war. World War II is seen by history as the ultimate "just" war, but I've seen documentaries and read accounts that show that during the Pacific theater especially, troop morale, desertion, and insubordination were high; very high.

What Guadalcanal was 'about' is almost irrelevant; this isn't a film about the island hopping campaign or the strategic importance of the island or even the battle. It's more about what goes through a soldier's head before, during, and after the shooting starts.

I've heard the experience of an infantryman in a land war described as 99% boredom and 1% sheer absolute terror. I'm attracted to the idea of a visually impressive war film that instead of hitting us over the head in the first ten minutes with nonstop gore and slaughter, shows us what amounts to a soldier sitting in the grass of a Pacific island many thousands of miles from home, grasping the damp stock of his rifle, and looking down at a grasshopper devouring a fly and pondering the meaning of conflict. Or a couple of AWOL soldiers playing with the children of a peaceful island village, dressed in loincloths and swimming off a beautiful shore and wondering why a few miles a way men were tearing each other to pieces over a war they didn't start. The film pulls this off without a straight up All Quiet on the Western Front-type anti-war agenda.

I disagree about the clichéd nature of the characters. I still remember Caviezel's character's "I'm twice the man you are" scene with Penn's character, and recall it frequently in my mind. There's not really a similar character from a war film that I can remember, and I think his mindset is the lens through which we absorb the film.

I can think of so many sequences in that movie that stuck with me, specifically the beach landing, the scene at the river where they happen upon the Japanese platoon, the flashbacks that the soldiers had of home, the spectacular no-cut steadycam scene when they attack the village, and the murder by cop death of Caviezel's character.

I'd almost forgotten about Cusack, who I think helped lead the raid that involved dropping grenades into foxholes. Just hearing you talk about it coupled with my own recollections makes me excited to watch it again. I have it on DVD, but honestly haven't watched it all the way through in at least three or four years. I just googled it and saw that there's a Criterion Collection Blu-Ray out that I haven't seen. I'll be sure and send you a copy.

Look, I know it's a rather divisive film. My uncle said it was the worst movie he's ever seen (I told him that it wasn't the movie's fault that he had no taste), but Gene Siskel called it the best contemporary war film ever made surpassing Platoon (Apocalypse Now still gets that nod IMO).

The point is, there's a place for this type of film making.

I can easily say that I appreciated it more than Private Ryan. Now I do love Saving Private Ryan and can still remember vividly my first experience in seeing it, and I think that we were lucky to have in the same year two spectacular World War II films set in opposite theaters, with completely opposite themes, styles, and executions. It just shows how versatile the film medium is, how one mind can envision relatively similar combat and situations in completely different ways.

As for Malick's films as a whole, again there's not a lot to go on. The guy averages about one movie per decade.

Days of Heaven was stunning to look at and virtually revolutionized the way filmmakers light the frame. It had a simple story about desperation, poverty, and betrayal, but the images are what stay with you.

The New World rivaled Thin Red Line's beauty, and told the Pocahontas story in a way that was fascinating and not loyal to political correctness. I thoroughly enjoyed it.

The reason I think Malick's movies are worth seeing is that what you basically get are extremely approachable experimental films. This is as far as you can get from average studio schlock, but without going off the deep end into indie film limbo. Malick is also about as non-Hollywood as you can get; he doesn't give interviews or even allow himself to be photographed for promotional material, and you certainly won't ever find him at any self congratulatory awards ceremony.

The poetic stream of consciousness narrative style isn't for everyone, but I have to disagree that the The Thin Red Line and Malick films (all four of them) are the equivalent of dangling a pretty picture in front of your face. They're much more than that to me.

41 posted on 01/26/2011 12:02:44 AM PST by GunRunner (10 Years of Freeping...)
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To: SeekAndFind
Ironically enough, Annette Bening's kid is definitely not all right.
42 posted on 01/30/2011 3:56:58 PM PST by winstonwolf33
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To: winstonwolf33

My pick for Best Picture is almost definitely Winter’s Bone; I grew up in the hills of North Carolina so the setting really hit home for me. Also how amazing were the performances?! I’d never have guessed that this was so many of the stars’ first roles.

By the way, not only does Movies On Demand on Cable have tons of nominees available to rent from the comfort of your home, but right now you can even enter to win a 3D HDTV just for picking out the nominated titles you’ve seen in their “Which Ones Have You Seen?” app! Visit Movies On Demand on Cable’s Facebook page to find out which titles you can catch up on from the comfort of your couch and to enter the sweepstakes:

http://www.facebook.com/moviesondemand

I’m working with Movies On Demand, so if anyone has any questions, just ask!


43 posted on 02/08/2011 7:25:53 PM PST by JamesFanscape
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