Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

In Observance of Black History Month
Wikipedia (in part); Barnes Review (in part); edited by me | Not | Me (mostly)

Posted on 02/01/2011 10:14:11 AM PST by ExGeeEye

In April of 1790, a black male slave child was born into the ownership of William Ellison of South Caroline. In keeping with the custom of the time, he was registered in the Ellison stock-book by the name of "April" (for the month of his birth) "Ellison" for his owner.

Apprenticed at 12, he was taught the trades of carpentry, blacksmithing and machining, as well as how to read, write, cipher and do basic bookkeeping. On June 8, 1816, his owner appeared before a magistrate (with five local freeholders as supporting witnesses) to gain permission to free April, now 26 years of age.

April Ellison set up shop and began manufacturing, among other things, cotton gins. In 1820 he petitioned to change his name to "William Ellison, Jr." for business purposes. His request was granted.

In time the black Ellison family joined the predominantly white Episcopalian church. On August 6, 1824 he was allowed to put a family bench on the first floor, among those of the wealthy white families. Other blacks, free and slave, and poor whites sat in the balcony. Another wealthy Negro family would later join the first floor worshippers.

He became one of South Carolina's major cotton gin manufacturers, selling his machines as far away as Mississippi. From February 1817 until the War Between the States commenced, his business advertisements appeared regularly in newspapers across the state. These included the Camden Gazette, the Sumter Southern Whig and the Black River Watchman.

In 1838 Ellison purchased on time 54.5 acres adjoining his original acreage from one Stephen D. Miller. He moved into a large home on the property. What made the acquisition notable was that Miller had served in the South Carolina legislature, both in the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate, and while a resident of Stateburg had been governor of the state. Ellison's next door neighbor was Dr. W.W. Anderson, master of "Borough House, a magnificent 18th Century mansion. Anderson's son would win fame in the War Between the States as General "Fighting Dick" Anderson.

By 1847 Ellison owned over 350 acres, and more than 900 by 1860. He raised mostly cotton, with a small acreage set aside for cultivating foodstuffs to feed his family.

William Ellison died December 5, 1861.

You likely did not learn this in school.

Ellison's success was due in no small part to his use of slave labor. At first he rented the slaves of others, then began buying, and even (illegally) breeding slaves for sale. In 1840 he owned 30 slaves, and by 1860 he owned 63. His sons, who lived in homes on the property, owned an additional nine slaves.

Ellison and family were by no means unique. According to federal census reports, on June 1, 1860 there were nearly 4.5 million Negroes in the United States, with fewer than four million of them living in the southern slaveholding states. Of the blacks residing in the South, 261,988 were not slaves. Of this number, 10,689 lived in New Orleans. The country's leading African American historian, Duke University professor John Hope Franklin, records that in New Orleans over 3,000 free Negroes owned slaves, or 28 percent of the free Negroes in that city. In 1860 there were at least six Negroes in Louisiana who owned 65 or more slaves The largest number, 152 slaves, were owned by the widow C. Richards and her son P.C. Richards, who owned a large sugar cane plantation. Another Negro slave magnate in Louisiana, with over 100 slaves, was Antoine Dubuclet, a sugar planter whose estate was valued at (in 1860 dollars) $264,000. That year, the mean wealth of southern white men was $3,978 (4).

The Ellison family actively supported the Confederacy throughout the war. They converted nearly their entire plantation to the production of corn, fodder, bacon, corn shucks and cotton for the Confederate armies. They paid $5,000 in taxes during the war. They also invested more than $9,000 in Confederate bonds, treasury notes and certificates in addition to the Confederate currency they held. At the end, all this valuable paper became worthless.

As worthless, may I say, as the perpetual whinging of the professional victim class today.

Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Ellison , http://americancivilwar.com/authors/black_slaveowners.htm


TOPICS: Cheese, Moose, Sister; History; Miscellaneous; Society
KEYWORDS: blackhistory
Well, there it is. Do with it what you will.
1 posted on 02/01/2011 10:14:18 AM PST by ExGeeEye
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

I was watching public television the other day and that black professor (I don’t remember his name, went to the beer summit with zero) showed Chris Rock that his ancestors had been slaves held by American Indians. Blew his mind. He said something to the effect of, “I don’t know how to feel about that. I always considered both blacks and Indians as being suppressed by whites.” And so on.


2 posted on 02/01/2011 10:20:01 AM PST by youngidiot
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

If he had lived today, he’d surely be a transfer payment slave on the Democrats’ Plantation, where no black is allowed to succeed lest he vote Republican. Congratulations, Liberals.


3 posted on 02/01/2011 10:20:17 AM PST by pabianice
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
Shhhhhhh


Don't wake up the libtards with facts...LOL

4 posted on 02/01/2011 10:21:51 AM PST by Nat Turner (I can see NOVEMBER from my house....)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: youngidiot

The beer summit Harvard professor name is Skippy Gates.


5 posted on 02/01/2011 10:33:09 AM PST by dancusa (Socialism is a philosophy of failure, the creed of ignorance, and the gospel of envy. W. Churchill)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

read later


6 posted on 02/01/2011 10:34:28 AM PST by John.Galt2012 (I'll take Liberty and you can keep the "Change"!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

While the posting was true, it is not politically correct, therefor will never be allowed to be taught in schools. Much like the fact that 60-70 thousand blacks fought for the south( Southern army was integrated). Up until the Northern media and Hollywood vilified the Confederate flag ( 1950-1960’s) many Southern Blacks had confederate flags in their home. The KKK flew ONLY the U.S. flag,never the Confederate battle flag that many Southern black fought under.


7 posted on 02/01/2011 10:39:01 AM PST by omegadawn (qualified)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

mark


8 posted on 02/01/2011 10:43:07 AM PST by ratsreek
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
Kewl.

For Black History Month, I'll be re-reading my Thomas Sowell book collection, re-watching Alan West speeches, and Sundays will be dedicated to listening to Pastor Manning.


Today is a good day to die.
I didn't say for whom.

9 posted on 02/01/2011 10:45:01 AM PST by The Comedian (It's 3am all over the planet.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Comedian

For BHM, I’m gonna watch “Stomp the Yard”, and that cinematic wonder, “Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo.”


10 posted on 02/01/2011 10:50:56 AM PST by Doctor 2Brains (If the government were Paris Hilton, it could not score a free drink in a bar full of lonely sailors)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
A discussion of slavery in America would not be complete without covering the case of Anthony Johnson. Mr Johnson, one of the first residents of the Jamestown colony in Virginia, became the first person to have a black man declared his slave for life (prior to that, they were indentured servants, and were supposed to be freed after seven years). Johnson went to court to have his slave, John Casor, declared a slave-for-life, and won the case, this creating chattel slavery in Virginia.

What is notable about the case is that Mr Johnson himself was black, and one of the first blacks to come to Jamestown in 1619, as an indentured servant.

11 posted on 02/01/2011 10:56:41 AM PST by PapaBear3625 ("It is only when we've lost everything, that we are free to do anything" -- Fight Club)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

Sure there are examples of slaves that were allowed an education and who earned their freedom. But I am not sure of your point.

While I think using the shortest month of the year for “Black History” month is some white guy’s idea of a bad joke, I don’t think it is reasonable to hold up a single example of anyone as a reason to perpetuate the slave class.

While there might have been 250,000 free negroes in the south before the war, there were still, by your numbers, some 3 million or so who were slaves.

Slavery was an abomination. No grey area about it. We talk about “Free Republic” and every person has the God given right to be free.

That said, I agree that generations of freed slave ancestors need to move on from the civil war and their treatment. I believe that there are a lot of white men and women who are very willing to give any other free person in this country a hand up. But that requires getting up off your ass to take the hand when it is offered to you. AND, there is a moral obligation to turn around, and help the next person in line.


12 posted on 02/01/2011 11:01:00 AM PST by Vermont Lt (Don't taze my junk bro.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: youngidiot

Louis Gates.


13 posted on 02/01/2011 11:13:37 AM PST by Retired Greyhound
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Doctor 2Brains
"...For BHM, I’m gonna watch “Stomp the Yard”, and that cinematic wonder, “Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo.”..."

Sarcasm aside, "Breakin 2 Electric Boogaloo" was a cinematic tour de force, and was the most awesome movie of 1984, IMO.

from Wiki:

Critical reception
New York Press film critic Armond White considers it to be "superb."[4] Roger Ebert gave the film a three-star review, despite most critics rating Breakin' 2 poorly.[5]

14 posted on 02/01/2011 12:48:33 PM PST by I Buried My Guns (Novare Res!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Vermont Lt

I agree that generations of freed slave ancestors need to move on from the civil war and their treatment.

<><><><><><

LOL. Soon to regret this comment, but there are a handful of unreconstructed southerners on this board who would benefit from that very same advice.


15 posted on 02/01/2011 12:52:54 PM PST by dmz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: dmz

Put on the flame proof suit my friend....


16 posted on 02/01/2011 12:55:59 PM PST by Vermont Lt (Don't taze my junk bro.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Vermont Lt

Put on the flame proof suit my friend....

<><><><

Nah, they are unlikely to come here and read this thread. There is nothing to draw them, no mention of Lincoln, no mention of slavery as the cause of the war, you know, the stuff that drives them crazy.


17 posted on 02/01/2011 1:41:41 PM PST by dmz
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: Vermont Lt
To re-order your message just a bit:

Slavery was an abomination.

Agreed.

...I don’t think it is reasonable to hold up a single example of anyone as a reason to perpetuate the slave class.

Again, agreed.

But I am not sure of your point.

Solely this: Mr. Ellison was a free Black man who himself owned 60+ Black slaves and participated actively not only in their purchase, use, and sale, but also in deliberately causing Black children to be born for the purpose of selling them. Additionally,

While there might have been 250,000 free negroes in the south before the war, there were still, by your numbers, some 3 million or so who were slaves.

Among whom Ellison was not at all unique in practicing slavery, and was indeed not the worst offender of his race.

Understand?

18 posted on 02/01/2011 2:04:29 PM PST by ExGeeEye (Freedom is saying "No!" to the Feds, and getting away with it. "Speak 'NO' to Power!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
Of this number, 10,689 lived in New Orleans. The country's leading African American historian, Duke University professor John Hope Franklin, records that in New Orleans over 3,000 free Negroes owned slaves, or 28 percent of the free Negroes in that city.

Actually that statistic is misleading and those figures cannot be true. If one looks at the 1860 census figures for Orleans Parish, subtract the free black male and female children (on the assumption that they wouldn't be slave holders), assume that most black male adults were married to one of the black female adults, and for the 3000 black slaveholder figure to be true virtually every black family in the city owned a slave. And that 72% of all slaveholders were black, in spite of the fact that free blacks comprised less than 7% of the total population. In short, those statistics don't make any sense whatsoever.

19 posted on 02/01/2011 2:11:03 PM PST by K-Stater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

OK. I understand your point, but it is going to be lost on the majority.

I mean, there are people who view the people of history through our eyes and our values/norms.

It was “normal” for southern farmers to own slaves. It was “normal” for us to not trust the “Japs” during the forties. It was “normal” for us to just want to kill as many of them with nukes as we could.

I agree, we need to keep all of this stuff in its proper context.

Personally, I think Black history month is stupid.

When my kids were in middle school, we had a party at our house. There were probably 20 kids here. Throughout the day i asked them what MLK was famous for. A vast majority—a super majority—told me that he freed the slaves. If this is the best that they can do for BHM, they should just can it and use the month for review.


20 posted on 02/01/2011 2:15:43 PM PST by Vermont Lt (Don't taze my junk bro.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Doctor 2Brains
For BHM, I’m gonna watch “Stomp the Yard”, and that cinematic wonder, “Breakin’ 2: Electric Boogaloo.”

No "Shaft"?

21 posted on 02/01/2011 2:16:55 PM PST by K-Stater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: K-Stater

Best tell him them.

At the moment I’ll accept his report as accurate, given his credentials and the liklihood that, if he had let a personal race-based bias bend his conclusions, they should have gone the other way.

http://jhfc.duke.edu/johnhopefranklin/

Oops, he’s dead. So go ahead and attack his research and conclusions, since he can’t rise up and defend them.


22 posted on 02/01/2011 2:16:55 PM PST by ExGeeEye (Freedom is saying "No!" to the Feds, and getting away with it. "Speak 'NO' to Power!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
At the moment I’ll accept his report as accurate, given his credentials and the liklihood that, if he had let a personal race-based bias bend his conclusions, they should have gone the other way.

Then by all means check out the figures for yourself and then tell me that they make sense to you. 1860 Census

If this same professor stated that 78% of all black men today suffer from the effects of slavery on their ancestors would you be so quick to accept his statement? Or would you say, "Whoa, that can't be right" and dig into it yourself?

23 posted on 02/01/2011 2:20:22 PM PST by K-Stater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
Solely this: Mr. Ellison was a free Black man who himself owned 60+ Black slaves and participated actively not only in their purchase, use, and sale, but also in deliberately causing Black children to be born for the purpose of selling them

At the same time, Mr. Ellison had no rights that a white man was bound to respect. He was not, and could never be a citizen of the U.S., or of the Confederacy had they won their independence. Being a wealthy slave owner didn't change that.

24 posted on 02/01/2011 2:26:27 PM PST by K-Stater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye

bttt


25 posted on 02/01/2011 2:28:02 PM PST by Rightly Biased (Do you know how awkward it is to have a political argument with a naked man?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: K-Stater
...virtually every black family in the city owned a slave...

Given what I've been learning on the subject, I chouldn't be at all surprised to find that, in as cosmopolitan a town an New Orleans, every free household had at least one domestic slave, and anyone with a business two or more (being much cheaper than hired help).

Yes, I looked at the census link you provided. Doesn't contradict Dr. Franklin, by me.

Thank you for your participation. I will ask, but not demand, that you at least acknowledge that Black agriculture, Black business, Black enterprise of all kinds existed and throve during the slavery era, in part at least because they participated in the institution, and that they voluntarily lent material and personnel support, for pay, to the CSA and its armed forces.

26 posted on 02/01/2011 2:51:17 PM PST by ExGeeEye (Freedom is saying "No!" to the Feds, and getting away with it. "Speak 'NO' to Power!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: K-Stater
...78% of all black men today suffer from the effects of slavery...

I should be surprised that wasn't closer to 100%, at least to some degree. There are things in my family history that color my attitudes about things in my own life; why should that be not true of anyone else? The only question is one of degree, and whether there is anyone currently living who is justly to blame.

27 posted on 02/01/2011 2:56:15 PM PST by ExGeeEye (Freedom is saying "No!" to the Feds, and getting away with it. "Speak 'NO' to Power!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: K-Stater
Mr. Ellison had no rights that a white man was bound to respect. He was not, and could never be a citizen of the U.S., or of the Confederacy had they won their independence. Being a wealthy slave owner didn't change that.

I will not presently dispute any part of your statement as to accuracy, although I have some cause to question it. Regardless, the absence of rights or citizenship do not seem to have been any impediment to his success.

28 posted on 02/01/2011 2:59:19 PM PST by ExGeeEye (Freedom is saying "No!" to the Feds, and getting away with it. "Speak 'NO' to Power!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
Given what I've been learning on the subject, I chouldn't be at all surprised to find that, in as cosmopolitan a town an New Orleans, every free household had at least one domestic slave, and anyone with a business two or more (being much cheaper than hired help).

Except the white households you mean. After all if 72% of all slaveholders in New Orleans were slaveholders then that would mean only 1100 of the 28,000 or so white families owned slaves, maybe 2 or 3 or 4 percent. Again, does that make sense to you?

Yes, I looked at the census link you provided. Doesn't contradict Dr. Franklin, by me.

If you accept that almost all black families in New Orleans owned slaves and almost none of the white ones did. Personally I find it hard to believe.

I will ask, but not demand, that you at least acknowledge that Black agriculture, Black business, Black enterprise of all kinds existed and throve during the slavery era, in part at least because they participated in the institution, and that they voluntarily lent material and personnel support, for pay, to the CSA and its armed forces.

I will say that there is a grain of truth in what you say, but not to the extent that you apparently believe. I will also say that I expect Black History Month will also me marked with myths and partial truths from both sides of the equation.

29 posted on 02/01/2011 3:09:24 PM PST by K-Stater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: K-Stater
Except the white households you mean.

No I don't. Since you are using that tactic, good-bye.

30 posted on 02/01/2011 3:37:36 PM PST by ExGeeEye (Freedom is saying "No!" to the Feds, and getting away with it. "Speak 'NO' to Power!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: GoDuke

BFL


31 posted on 02/01/2011 5:28:54 PM PST by GoDuke
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: ExGeeEye
No I don't. Since you are using that tactic, good-bye.

Sorry. No racial bias was implied, certainly not on your part, just simple statistics. There were 4169 slaveholders in Orleans Parish in 1860. According to you about 3000 of them were black. That means 72% of all slave owners in New Orleans were black. There were 149,063 free white people in Orleans Parish compared with fewer than 11,000 free black people. That means fewer than 7% of all free people were black. If there were 32,500 families in Orleans Parish, roughly 4000 of which were black, and if there were 1170 white slave owners, and assuming almost all were family men then, that means according to the statistics you quoted fewer than 4% of all white families owned slaves as opposed to three quarters of all black families. So again I would ask, does that make any sense to you?

32 posted on 02/01/2011 6:16:38 PM PST by K-Stater
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: K-Stater

.


33 posted on 02/27/2011 1:00:35 PM PST by mojitojoe (In it’s 1400 years of existence, Islam has 2 main accomplishments, psychotic violence and goat curr)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: K-Stater

Sorry. No racial bias was implied,
_____________
SUREEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE


34 posted on 02/27/2011 1:01:29 PM PST by mojitojoe (In it’s 1400 years of existence, Islam has 2 main accomplishments, psychotic violence and goat curr)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson