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The Other Deer Hunters
Field and Stream ^ | February 09, 2011 | Scott Bestul

Posted on 02/09/2011 6:07:37 PM PST by SJackson

As whitetail predators, coyotes may be more destructive than ever.

If you think coyotes aren’t killing a lot of deer, you’re not alone. You’re also probably wrong. Significant coyote predation has been documented in various parts of the whitetail’s range. But throughout much of the South, Midwest, and suburban Northeast, the coyote is a fairly new predator and is barely on the radar of many whitetail hunters and experts.

In over three decades of deer hunting and observation, I had personally come to view them as bumbling opportunists—more Wile E. Coyote than the Big Bad Wolf—when it comes to killing whitetails. But a pair of new research papers presented at the February 2009 meeting of the Southeast Deer Study Group, both conducted where coyotes had not historically been a problem, reveal a different story. What’s more, with coyotes now virtually everywhere whitetails are, and their numbers exploding in many areas, their impact is likely more lethal than ever.

The New Research In the first study, conducted by John C. Kilgo with the USDA in west-central South Carolina from 2006 to 2008, researchers implanted vaginal transmitters in pregnant does. When a doe gave birth, the transmitter was ejected along with the fawn, allowing researchers to capture the newborn deer and fit it with a monitor. When a fawn died, the monitor led researchers to the remains, where they collected DNA evidence to ID the fawn’s killer.

The results were jaw-dropping. Out of the 60 fawns monitored, 44 died within eight weeks. The killers were abandonment (one), unknown predators (two), bobcats (six), and coyotes (28 confirmed and seven probables). In other words, if you include the probables, coyotes accounted for 80 percent of all mortality.

The second study was conducted by Brent Howze and Robert Warren of the University of Georgia on a 29,000-acre area of the Peach State with a low fawn-to-doe ratio. To determine whether predation was causing poor fawn recruitment, researchers removed 23 coyotes from an 11,000-acre study block from January through August 2008. On a 7,000-acre control block of similar habitat, no predators were removed. In the fall, camera surveys showed a meager .07-to-1 fawn-to-doe ratio in the control area. In the zone where predators had been trapped, however, the ratio was a vastly better .72-to-1.

“Coyote predation is the big issue right now,” declares noted University of Georgia deer researcher Dr. Karl V. Miller, who supervised the second study. “It’s something we must take more seriously in whitetail management going forward.”

So what can you do? First, aim for a balanced buck-to-doe ratio on your property. It ensures a short, intense breeding season, which results in a short, intense fawn drop—and that narrows the window of opportunity for coyotes to kill young deer. Second, encourage grassy, brushy, young growth so does can drop fawns in comparatively predator-safe cover. Third, if you notice an upswing in local coyote numbers, you may want to decrease your doe harvest. Finally, become a coyote hunter. You’ll help keep predator numbers in check, and have a lot of fun, too. .


TOPICS: Local News
KEYWORDS: coyotes; urbanhunters

1 posted on 02/09/2011 6:07:42 PM PST by SJackson
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To: SJackson

Where we live, being able to reach out the window and club a deer with a claw hammer has taken the fun out of hunting.


2 posted on 02/09/2011 6:13:30 PM PST by fso301
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To: SJackson

“But throughout much of the South, (Midwest, and suburban Northeast,don’t know about those areas) the coyote is a fairly new predator and is barely on the radar .”

Pure BS

These suckers will tear the hell out of a watermelon patch.Kill them all.They’re all over the place down here.They love watermelons; hint.


3 posted on 02/09/2011 6:13:37 PM PST by silentreignofheroes
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To: Iowa Granny; Ladysmith; Diana in Wisconsin; JLO; sergeantdave; damncat; phantomworker; joesnuffy; ..
If you’d like to be on or off this Upper outdoors/rural list please FR mail me. And ping me is you see articles of interest.

Coyotes go hand in hand with fawn predation, more coyotes, fewer fawns make it to summer. Lots of attention has been focused on predators in WI and the disappointing deer population the last couple years. The harsh winters in 08-09 also had an impact. One issue I've not seen addressed is the packing up of coyotes, which of course is purely anecdotal the DNR not identifying it as an issue. One coyote, a threat to deer, three or four, a bigger threat. And if they're not packing up, why at night in winter or spring can I hear them yipping at me from three sides. Aggressive democrats pursuing my vote?

4 posted on 02/09/2011 6:13:43 PM PST by SJackson (In wine there is wisdom, In beer there is freedom, In water there is bacteria.)
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To: SJackson

They forgot to add wolves and bears into the mix we are not in short supply of them in Northern Wis and may other places.


5 posted on 02/09/2011 6:15:05 PM PST by riverrunner
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To: SJackson

I live about 15 miles west of Grand Rapids, Michigan. I walked outside the other night and heard coyotes howling....it was a little unnerving. I’ve got chickens and I’ve got a shotgun and if I see a coyote it’s not going to be alive long.


6 posted on 02/09/2011 6:16:45 PM PST by DouglasKC
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To: DouglasKC

I agree with your sentiment, but walking at night, you probably won’t see em.


7 posted on 02/09/2011 6:18:37 PM PST by SJackson (In wine there is wisdom, In beer there is freedom, In water there is bacteria.)
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To: riverrunner

Yeah, doubt bears are an issue with deer, they’ve been around forever. Wolves, goodness, the DNR is only recently admitting their resurgance, and I suspect they’re an issue.


8 posted on 02/09/2011 6:21:07 PM PST by SJackson (In wine there is wisdom, In beer there is freedom, In water there is bacteria.)
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To: SJackson

They come right up to the farmhouse. I have apple trees next to the house and when my kids were babies I went out one night to yell at them to shut up.

Two just looked at me as if sizing me up. But before my temper took over, my English mastiff, who had come out behind me, went past me faster than I have ever seen it move. There was no doubt nothing would be left of those coyotes but smears in the dirt.

They took off with a two hundred pound dog hot on their trail. They aren’t stupid. I didn’t see or hear of a coyote on my side of the lake for months.


9 posted on 02/09/2011 6:26:09 PM PST by IrishCatholic (No local Communist or Socialist Party Chapter? Join the Democrats, it's the same thing!)
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To: fso301

Not having a gun or a hunting license, I’ve tried to stone deer to death. Doesn’t work. They just stand and look at me as they munch my prized hybrid tea roses. Have at ‘em coyotes. Be my guest.


10 posted on 02/09/2011 6:27:38 PM PST by WestSylvanian
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To: SJackson

Welcome to our world.

Down here in South Texas, Coyotes were here before people. And they ARE smart, nasty, tenacious, and audacious. I’m not sure they are that much of a threat to wildlife anymore. They’ve figured out that eating is much better in the city and they are rapidly moving in (apparently Fluffy is easier to hunt than Bambi).

I’ve seem them walking along the street, in broad daylight, almost as if saying, “what are you going to do, start shooting and get a ticket?”. Outside of killing them, there is not much you can do to get rid of them.


11 posted on 02/09/2011 6:28:50 PM PST by I cannot think of a name
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To: SJackson
“But throughout much of the South, (Midwest, and suburban Northeast,don’t know about those areas) the coyote is a fairly new predator and is barely on the radar .” Pure BS

I am in Arkansas and have seen the coyote population literally explode over the past five to six years. They are taking a lot of deer, I can certainly attest to that fact.

12 posted on 02/09/2011 6:29:20 PM PST by RobertClark (On a long enough timeline the survival rate for everyone drops to zero.)
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To: SJackson

Anyone use nighttime wildlife cameras in their yard?


13 posted on 02/09/2011 6:31:06 PM PST by tubebender (The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in Eureka...)
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To: SJackson

Someone once told me: If you decide to hunt coyotes then make sure you get a good look before you shoot. You don’t want to walk up to it and find that the “coyote” has a collar and tags.


14 posted on 02/09/2011 6:31:30 PM PST by Aglooka ("I was out numbered 5-to-1, I got 4.")
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To: SJackson

Heard a whitetail hunter this season tell of killing a deer and a bobcat after the deer and then a cayote after the bobcat. Predators are in abundance as are the deer


15 posted on 02/09/2011 6:33:46 PM PST by Figment ("A communist is someone who reads Marx.An anti-communist is someone who understands Marx" R Reagan)
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To: DouglasKC

I live in Jenison and I have 5 acres in the back yard. I have coyotes right in the middle of Jenison. They are all over the place over here. I have had them with their nose on my slider door and my cats hissing at them. Almost got one last year with my .17 Ruger. I also have 10 acres in Hopkins and had one follow me all the way to my truck at about 1 am. I thought it was my uncles dog until I got a flashlight and hit it with the beam....and then my .40 cal.

If you have them.....and you know where they will be, kill em. They take cats, small dogs, pheasants, ducks, and lots of deer.


16 posted on 02/09/2011 6:34:30 PM PST by Michigan Bowhunter
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To: SJackson

I see signs for missing cats and dogs in my neighborhood frequently. The prairie dogs are faster, so the coyotes (and foxes) go for easier food.


17 posted on 02/09/2011 6:36:08 PM PST by dynachrome ("Our forefathers didn't bury their guns. They buried those that tried to take them.")
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To: SJackson

Deer hunting in CA sucks. I have to travel to CO to have any luck. Too many predators here. Mountain lions are protected and can’t be shot.


18 posted on 02/09/2011 6:41:14 PM PST by umgud
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To: tubebender

To paraphrase a recent President, it depends on the meaning of what yard is.


19 posted on 02/09/2011 6:41:45 PM PST by SJackson (In wine there is wisdom, In beer there is freedom, In water there is bacteria.)
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To: SJackson

We have a coyote pack in our area. We’ve seen some tracks in the snow this winter but it’s been several years since they were back in our woods howling every night.

I think a serious danger this article doesn’t mention is that in parts of the Northeast, which has only recently been overrun by coyotes, they have cross-bred with wolves. What you get from that is a pretty dangerous animal.

Luckily, our dogs seem to keep them away from the house.


20 posted on 02/09/2011 6:41:47 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: SJackson
Those mangy varments cause a lot of problems with the cattle too. Especially with calving season here.

I always have the lever action 30-30 near.

21 posted on 02/09/2011 6:45:35 PM PST by MountainDad (Support your local Militia)
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To: SJackson
Our California Black Tail Deer seem to have found comfort in our yard for several years...


22 posted on 02/09/2011 6:45:43 PM PST by tubebender (The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in Eureka...)
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To: SJackson


23 posted on 02/09/2011 6:45:44 PM PST by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: Michigan Bowhunter

Yes, I don’t hunt them. And they’re not stupid, and when they’re just hanging around, which is what they do, they don’t present shooting opportunities.


24 posted on 02/09/2011 6:46:31 PM PST by SJackson (In wine there is wisdom, In beer there is freedom, In water there is bacteria.)
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To: Cicero

How many dogs do you have? I don’t know about coyotes that much but will a pack of them try to harm/kill your dogs if they outnumber them?


25 posted on 02/09/2011 6:47:14 PM PST by momtothree
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To: Cicero

Eastern coyotes are essentially a hybrid of the little wiley coyotes of the southwest and Canadian wolves. Frequently underestimated is terms of size. I’ve got trail cam pics of them where you argue whether over whether it’s a coyote or wolf based on ear shape and butt size. Whatever they might be, they’re bigger than most German Shepards, which is bigger than many folk would tell you Eastern Coyotes are.


26 posted on 02/09/2011 6:52:48 PM PST by SJackson (In wine there is wisdom, In beer there is freedom, In water there is bacteria.)
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To: Joe 6-pack

Show me what they can do in the snow.


27 posted on 02/09/2011 6:54:07 PM PST by SJackson (In wine there is wisdom, In beer there is freedom, In water there is bacteria.)
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To: momtothree
I don’t know about coyotes that much but will a pack of them try to harm/kill your dogs if they outnumber them?

Yes, unfortunately. They can even take a fairly large dog if it is weak or old.

My dog goes into stealth mode when there is a pack of coyotes near the house. For anything else he barks up a storm.

28 posted on 02/09/2011 6:56:48 PM PST by freeandfreezing
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To: SJackson

Yeah these things are no joke, a canadian pop star was killed and eaten by a pack of coyotes:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_Mitchell


29 posted on 02/09/2011 7:00:18 PM PST by Weird Tolkienish Figure
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To: SJackson


As whitetail predators, coyotes may be more destructive than ever.

Here in Mid-Missori (Columia, MO), the coyotes seem to be on the rise.
We livc on the southwest side of Columbia with an adjacent multi-acre
undeveloped field.
Occassionally, maybe once every two weeks, we are treated to the howling
of a pack of what we can only presume to be a pack of coyotes.
We have local deer...but lately haven’t seen them much.
Given the harshness of our “global warming” winter (guffaw), the deer
may be on the downturn.
Although I have some testosterone, I no longer walk my brother’s
Australian Cattle Dog in that area for fear of encountering a pack of coyotes
(no matter how generally timid coyotes are reputed to be).

A local talk-radio show host mentioned that while riding by
a park area about 3 miles from our home at about 5AM...
he was spooked by hearing the howling of a pack of what he presumed were coyotes.
I don’t worry that the local coyotes wil attack humans...but if hungry enough
during an extreme winter...who knows?


30 posted on 02/09/2011 7:14:47 PM PST by VOA (`)
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To: SJackson
This was inevitable.

All over the Northeast there are "No Hunting" counties where the deer population has just exploded. Some nights literally dozens are maimed and killed on the roads, and many struggle off to die in the woods.

Nature abhors a vacuum. Enter the coyote, coy dogs, those BIG Wolf/Coyote hybrids, and every once in a while, the elusive puma. Not too proud to feast on carrion, these guys can run down a deer quite efficiently, too! Even black bears are in it for the leftovers! Badgers, wolverines, vultures ... having a field day and picnic, thank you!

Nature red in fang and claw. If you doubt my naturalist bonafides, here's how I can prove my theory. If there's a Democrat in your neighborhood, trap him, truss him, smear him with bacon fat, and use him as bait for your trail cam. Check the camera daily. Your fatter Democrats can often be put out for 2 or 3 nights. For wolverines and such, the riper the better.

31 posted on 02/09/2011 7:15:44 PM PST by Kenny Bunk (Man up, Mubarak ... you're Air Force!)
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To: SJackson

Back about 1990 I stopped along a highway on the Mass/Conn. border to check what appeared to be a dead dog in the road. My 120lb Shepherd was banging up against the sides of my pick up when I stepped out and approached the “dog”. Turned out to be a fat coyote better than sixty pounds I would guess. He must have had a nice life raiding garbage cans and chowing down cats all along the Connecticut River prior to being smacked on the highway. As I hauled his sorry ass off to the side of the road I recall thinking “man this is one big coyote” while my dog roared at me and him from the truck.


32 posted on 02/09/2011 7:15:50 PM PST by massatoosits
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To: SJackson

I should mention that (IIRC) Discovery Channel had a documentary that
showed something like 2,000 coyotes lurk in the Chicagoland areas.
One strayed into a conveience store near downtown Chicago.
(and didn’t apprear to be deranged or suffering from a neurological
defect like rabies).


33 posted on 02/09/2011 7:19:23 PM PST by VOA (`)
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To: SJackson
I usually see one or two coyotes every deer season. This year I saw a bobcat instead.

Next time I see a coyote though, I'm going to drop it.

34 posted on 02/09/2011 7:34:51 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum ("If they bring a knife to the fight, we bring a gun." -- Barry Soetoro, June 11, 2008)
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To: momtothree

Our basset got ripped and had to be stitched about four years ago, but we think that was probably a fisher cat. The coyotes hung out for several years in our woods until they moved on to another feeding ground. We have plenty of deer in the neighborhood, a good sized flock of wild turkeys, and lots of other animals.

I suppose the coyotes probably could take on the dogs if they were hungry enough to feel the necessity, but they’d much rather tackle something less challenging if there is any choice. As it is, they avoid the dogs, and they pretty much avoid the five acres our dogs roam in and mark. We have a shepherd/hound mix, a basset, and a bloodhound who died last fall. The shepherd/hound is a pretty fierce fighter if she is challenged, and the basset gets in low and can do a pretty good job, too.

We have bears who wander around the woods, too, but they also prefer to avoid the dogs as long as they are not challenged.


35 posted on 02/09/2011 8:13:55 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: SJackson
I can't speak re the deer population, but yotes decimate rabbits and quails. If you listen to the idiot tree hugging animal rights New Age moron coyote apologists, however, yotes don't kill anything.

I guess the coyote orders out.

36 posted on 02/09/2011 8:30:17 PM PST by LouAvul
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To: DouglasKC
I was hunting in CT the last week of muzzle loader season and I saw the biggest coyote I've ever seen. It looked like a big Siberian Husky that weighed all of 90 pounds. I thought it was a wolf but everybody keeps telling me there are no wolves in CT. If I see it again next year I'm going to shoot it.
37 posted on 02/09/2011 8:39:51 PM PST by peeps36 (America is being destroyed by filthy traitors in the political establishment)
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To: SJackson
Coyotes regularly run across the field here in Anza. They've killed some of our pups and cats. I shot one with a .45 a while back. I know I hit her, but she ran off. Don't know whether she survived long.
38 posted on 02/09/2011 8:46:17 PM PST by JoeFromSidney (New book: RESISTANCE TO TYRANNY. A primer on armed revolt. Available form Amazon.)
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To: riverrunner

My neighbor lives on 23 acres of wooded land in Mequon (SE Wisconsin) just outside Milwaukee. She’s spotted wolves runningn her land.Since she owns a German Shepherd and a yellow Lab, she knows the differrnce between a wolf and a big dog. She won’t report it to the DNR because she’s afraid that they’ll declare her land a wolf habitat!


39 posted on 02/09/2011 8:52:27 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: riverrunner

My neighbor lives on 23 acres of wooded land in Mequon (SE Wisconsin) just outside Milwaukee. She’s spotted wolves runningn her land.Since she owns a German Shepherd and a yellow Lab, she knows the differrnce between a wolf and a big dog. She won’t report it to the DNR because she’s afraid that they’ll declare her land a wolf habitat!


40 posted on 02/09/2011 8:52:27 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: tubebender

We have a hunter who hunts on our land every year during bow and gun seasons. Although my husband is a hunter,he prefers to travel to hunt. But our “guest” hunter places motion sensitive cameras n the trees every August-October to track the deer wanderings. (I just look at their hoof prints.) In addition to capturing me on the lawmower, he’s captured lots of shots of bucks on our property. We see the does and fawns all the time, but we seldom see a buck. They are out there,ut they keep themselves hidden. I saw 8 in our driveway the other night when we came home from watching the Super Bowl.


41 posted on 02/09/2011 8:59:40 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: SJackson

Atlanta suburbs are lousy with Coyotes. We have them in our neighborhood. No fear of humans. One took a run at our Chihuahua one night as we were walking her and our Beagle. I had to pick the little one up while my fiancee’ was making a run at it with a maglite. We went back in the house and waited about 20 minutes and took the dog out again and within a minute the Coyote appeared out of the woods again. Best thing to do is see a Coyote shoot a Coyote. They are a total nusiance animal.


42 posted on 02/09/2011 9:21:40 PM PST by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: WestSylvanian; All
Not having a gun or a hunting license, I’ve tried to stone deer to death. Doesn’t work. They just stand and look at me as they munch my prized hybrid tea roses. Have at ‘em coyotes. Be my guest.

You got that right. All they are is potential hood ornaments where we live. I'd like to see more people hunt them. I've stopped hunting because where we live they are more like vermin and something seems wrong about getting up early to go hunting when i can stand in my doorway and club them most any day.

Last year, I went out with my son and he got his first buck. This year, we went out together and he got another. While I had a license, I did so simply to be able to carry a gun in the woods and not go through a big hassle should some game warden happen to come along. I didn't fill any of my tags because with the bucks my son killed, we have plenty of tough, dry venison in the deep freeze without need of additional contribution by me.

Next season may be more of a problem because my daughter will be old enough to take into the woods. If she and my son take a buck, we'll be eating tough, dry venison most of the year when my preference is for a nicely marbled ribey.

43 posted on 02/10/2011 4:40:58 AM PST by fso301
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