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Gen Y Not Slackers, Just Slow Starters
Live Science ^ | March 24, 2011 | Unknown

Posted on 03/25/2011 6:25:42 AM PDT by decimon

Generation Y is often thought of as a slacker group of young adults who have failed to launch, delaying real careers and families until later in life. But new research suggests their heavy dependence on Mom and Dad might ultimately prepare them to be successful adults.

Specifically, the study found this generation of "emerging adults" turns to parental support in times of difficultly and as a way to advance their careers in a job market geared toward the highly educated, though most are weaned from such support by their early 30s.

"On a general level, people have concerns about young adults being more dependent than their parents' or grandparents' generations," said researcher Teresa Swartz of the University of Minnesota.

In the mid-20th century, most parents could safely assume their children would be full-fledged adults by their mid 20s, economically stable with their own homes and families. Five decades later, half of twentysomethings are still supported by their parents in some capacity at age 24, the study shows.

"People know that it is a challenge to be a young adult and start off your adult life today," Swartz said. "It's taking longer to find their job and move out of their parental home."

A 2009 survey by the Pew Research Center found that 13 percent of parents with grown children say an adult son or daughter had moved back home over the past year for various reasons, including the recession, with most so-called "boomerangers" in the 18 to 34 age group.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Society
KEYWORDS: generationy
This at least avoids the usual mysticism of generational traits to give reasons for what's occurring.
1 posted on 03/25/2011 6:25:44 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

Oh great, I see another boomer bashing thread coming.


2 posted on 03/25/2011 6:27:27 AM PDT by caver (Obama: Home of the Whopper)
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To: decimon
most are weaned from such support by their early 30s.

Society is in deep, deep trouble if most "kids" are still receiving parental support into their 30s. Clearly, something has gone terribly wrong.

3 posted on 03/25/2011 6:29:04 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: decimon

gonna play hell with demographics.


4 posted on 03/25/2011 6:30:16 AM PDT by Poison Pill
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To: decimon

They’re weaned by their 30s—what’s the big deal? LOL.


5 posted on 03/25/2011 6:31:49 AM PDT by Huck (Fools make feasts and wise men eat them - Poor Richard)
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To: ClearCase_guy

Yeah, cost of living is at an all time high. Very simply math.


6 posted on 03/25/2011 6:32:00 AM PDT by GlockThe Vote (Who needs Al Queda to worry about when we have Obama?)
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To: caver
One of my son's is in trade school, working and still living at home. As long as he contributes to the household I have no problem with this. I gave all five of my kids a choice at 18, move out, pay rent, or help around the home, and you must hold a job or go to school.
7 posted on 03/25/2011 6:35:24 AM PDT by ladyvet ( I would rather have Incitatus then the asses that are in congress today.)
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To: ladyvet

Alexander the Great of Macedonia was conquering the known world at age 17 or so. My...how times have changed. We wouldn’t want our children to get stressed now, would we?


8 posted on 03/25/2011 6:38:33 AM PDT by hal ogen (1st amendment or reeducation camp?)
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To: ClearCase_guy
Clearly, something has gone terribly wrong.

De-evolution.

9 posted on 03/25/2011 6:38:58 AM PDT by Huck (Fools make feasts and wise men eat them - Poor Richard)
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To: GlockThe Vote

cost of living is high, jobs are scarce (good quality blue color jobs are almost impossible to find and white color jobs are going the same way) education, rent, fuel, and food costs are astronomical. Not to mention public schooling means that most graduates need to take the equivalent 13th and 14th grade in college to get to where they should have been when they graduated high school.

The way the country is going alot of people my age seem to think why bother? Or thanks to afore mentioned public school they think the government should support them once mom and dad stop. The future seems bleak enough why not drink, party, and game?

I will also say that the majority of my generation seem to be idiots. Most of them voted for Obama and haven’t seemed to have learned from it.


10 posted on 03/25/2011 6:40:49 AM PDT by utherdoul
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To: decimon

Instead of letting kids move back home, parents ought to tell them to make some government-reform signs and head for Washington D. C.

If the millions of unemployed would show up, as they are doing in other countries, it might get some attention from the ruling class in the government and media.
The politicians wouldn’t find it nearly as charming if it were on the US capitol lawn, instead of TV coverage from the Middle East.


11 posted on 03/25/2011 6:40:49 AM PDT by kittymyrib
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To: decimon
most are weaned from such support by their early 30s

How encouraging.

12 posted on 03/25/2011 6:41:46 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Nadie me ama como Jesus.)
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To: GlockThe Vote
This is coming from the Pew Center, originally founded as the Tribune's in-house polling organization to produce tailored polls.

You can't expect them to be capable of broad analysis or accurate data. Their job is to propose a desired result and cull available facts to support it.

13 posted on 03/25/2011 6:42:47 AM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: decimon

“People know that it is a challenge to be a young adult and start off your adult life today,” Swartz said. “It’s taking longer to find their job and move out of their parental home.”

Sorry, my grandfather was farming his own acreage, by himself, at age 16. THAT’s a challenge. Maybe if these young “adults” weren’t raised to think they’re entitled to the PERFECT job right out of school, they’d be “out of their parental home” at age 21 or 22.

Colonel, USAFR


14 posted on 03/25/2011 6:55:08 AM PDT by jagusafr ("We hold these truths to be self-evident...")
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To: decimon

I’ll say that there was a fair amount of guilt or doubt that I felt when my older son left. I had made clear that he should have a plan, direction, etc. during his last few years of High School - he was certainly “Momma’s boy” and the bonds still are incredibly tight. But, I think everyone can see that he’s better off for it - mature, takes responsibility, and has a good work ethic. Even though son #2 is still at home, Mom (and dad too) had a fair amount of empty nest feelings when the older one left.

Kids need love, but they need a ton of pressure too. We’re supposed to be prepping them for the real world, not giving them a pampered childhood.


15 posted on 03/25/2011 6:57:31 AM PDT by Sax
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To: jagusafr

My 16-year-old keeps saying he wants “this” type of a job, or doesn’t want “that” kind, and I say, “Bill, you want a job with pay!”

If he doesn’t appear ready to “launch” in a reasonable period, I’ll move another brother into his room ... either the crazy one or the destructive one ...


16 posted on 03/25/2011 6:58:52 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Nadie me ama como Jesus.)
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To: Tax-chick

LOL! Creative parenting. :)


17 posted on 03/25/2011 7:00:24 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: hal ogen

High cost of living etc. nowdays. You can’t seriously compare today to the time of Alexander the Great.


18 posted on 03/25/2011 7:03:21 AM PDT by rwfromkansas ("Carve your name on hearts, not marble." - C.H. Spurgeon)
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To: trisham

Would you want to share a room with two little boys - including Sheldon - and one bathroom with seven other people, including two teenaged girls? At that point, ROTC is going to look *really good*.

One reason may chronological adults don’t leave home is that it’s just too comfortable. Maybe we’ll have this problem when only the last two are left.


19 posted on 03/25/2011 7:04:25 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Nadie me ama como Jesus.)
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To: rwfromkansas

High cost of living???? So work harder and longer. To an emerging adult the cost of living always seems somewhat insurmountable. All of a sudden YOU have to pay for things that you took for granted (like toothpaste, food, clothing, transportation, living space and so forth). Cry me a river.


20 posted on 03/25/2011 7:07:39 AM PDT by hal ogen (1st amendment or reeducation camp?)
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To: hal ogen; rwfromkansas

I agree with “hal ogen.” Rather than “high cost of living,” we could frame the problem as “high standard of living.”


21 posted on 03/25/2011 7:13:52 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Nadie me ama como Jesus.)
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To: hal ogen

You are clueless. How are you going to work longer when there are no jobs around that pay more than 10-15 an hour?


22 posted on 03/25/2011 7:15:14 AM PDT by GlockThe Vote (Who needs Al Queda to worry about when we have Obama?)
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To: hal ogen

You paint with broad strokes. I read on this board all the time of 40-50-60 year olds looking for work after being canned in this economy. Many are collecting unemployment to get by. Not all kids are lazy and pounding on the chats in the basement.


23 posted on 03/25/2011 7:19:07 AM PDT by ladyvet ( I would rather have Incitatus then the asses that are in congress today.)
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To: Tax-chick
Would you want to share a room with two little boys - including Sheldon - and one bathroom with seven other people, including two teenaged girls? At that point, ROTC is going to look *really good*.

One reason may chronological adults don’t leave home is that it’s just too comfortable. Maybe we’ll have this problem when only the last two are left.

*********************************

I'm already sharing a room with three dogs, a 75 pound puppy, and my husband. I don't think I can fit two boys in there with a shoehorn. :)

Maybe I should join the ROTC.

24 posted on 03/25/2011 7:21:26 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: trisham

I sometimes think about running away to ROTC, myself.

Good idea about the dogs, though. We can move the greyhound in with Bill and the annoying brothers, too!


25 posted on 03/25/2011 7:23:28 AM PDT by Tax-chick (Nadie me ama como Jesus.)
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To: GlockThe Vote

If a job pays $10 that is better than sitting around moaning. You do what you have to do. As to being “clueless”...are you a liberal or something with such personal attacks? Have a great day!


26 posted on 03/25/2011 7:28:19 AM PDT by hal ogen (1st amendment or reeducation camp?)
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To: Tax-chick

LOL! I think that might work!


27 posted on 03/25/2011 7:29:02 AM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: hal ogen

And someone who brings home $400 a week in most areas can not afford to live on their own.

So, its not a matter os laziness - its economic reality and basic math.


28 posted on 03/25/2011 7:30:49 AM PDT by GlockThe Vote (Who needs Al Queda to worry about when we have Obama?)
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To: ClearCase_guy
I don't know -- now a lot of times, people need to have Masters degrees, so end up being in college until they are 25/26. Then loans to pay, so 29-30 is a break-even age. early 30s is too late, but remember that many couldn't afford houses as the prices shot up like mad

Also, in the 50s and 60s, what was the life-expectancy? 60? Now it's mid-70 for whites, meaning people have that much longer a life.

29 posted on 03/25/2011 7:34:27 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin+Jindal: 2012)
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To: decimon
"Parents were more likely to give if the young adult was engaged in building their skills or educational potential, so they would be more marketable when they enter the job market."

So a 30 something is still in college which is paid for by the parents? Not in my home.

30 posted on 03/25/2011 7:35:35 AM PDT by mlocher (Is it time to cash in before I am taxed out?)
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To: hal ogen

Though at the time of Alex the Great (300 BC), the average life expectancy in Macedonia and Greece, not to mention the civilised worlds of Persia, Egypt etc. was still 35-40.


31 posted on 03/25/2011 7:35:48 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin+Jindal: 2012)
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To: hal ogen

Deviating from the topic, but my pet peeve is that Alex was not quite so great. He inherited a strong army, a stable bureaucracy and organization from his father, Philip the Great of Macedon (now THAT guy really shook up things). And, he was lucky that the Persian Empire was ruled by a weak king (remember at that time the Persians ruled over all of what is now Egypt, Israel, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kirghizia, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Kuwait, Bahrain, Oman, the UAE and parts of India, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Oman (or had influences in these places). Alex just toppled the weak king and everyone came to his side.


32 posted on 03/25/2011 7:38:45 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin+Jindal: 2012)
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To: Cronos

Exactly - during the housing boom - most gen y, and gen x’ers on the lower side like myself got priced out of the housing market altogether.


33 posted on 03/25/2011 7:39:09 AM PDT by GlockThe Vote (Who needs Al Queda to worry about when we have Obama?)
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To: Tax-chick
Perhaps it's good to:
  1. Make kids get small jobs (not to pay them for errands which they should be doing in any case)
  2. Make them invest this in the stock market and play with the numbers, but limited.
  3. Learn a couple of languages and maybe give tuitions

34 posted on 03/25/2011 7:41:16 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin+Jindal: 2012)
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To: ClearCase_guy

...or still spending hours daily playing video games instead of working, marrying, and having kids.


35 posted on 03/25/2011 7:41:29 AM PDT by DennisR (Look around - God gives countless, indisputable clues that He does, indeed, exist.)
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To: Cronos
You make my point. Something has gone wrong with our society.

Once upon a time, a HS diploma really meant you were well educated. Does it mean that today?
Once upon a time, a college degree meant that you were destined to be one of the top dogs in our society. Does it mean that today?
Once upon a time, a graduate degree meant that you were an egghead. Today, it's the criteria for an entry-level job.

Inflation, taxes, housing costs, energy costs -- our society is broken. There are those who shrug and say, "So? Kids sponge off their parents until they are in their 30s. No big deal." But I think we need to step back and say "What the hell happened to our country?"

My answer: Too much Progressivism; not enough traditional American support for limited government.

36 posted on 03/25/2011 7:43:17 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: GlockThe Vote

If they can’t afford to live on their own, they should find several similar-situation roommates. Also, why stop at working 40 hours per week? There are 168 hours per week available to each of us. Give 8 hours per day for sleep, 2 1/2 hours per day for eating and 1 hour per day of personal hygiene that leaves about 87 1/2 hours for work each week...earning $$$$$. Let’s say you pull together a few part time jobs for 60 hours per week at $10 per hour. That would be $600 per week times 52 weeks in a year...voila: $31,200 per year. That isn’t living in the gutter and eating scraps of garbage off the street thrown out by the “privileged” as they drive by in their Mercedes.

Of course when you only want to do want you want to do, when you only want to work for 35-40 hours each week and when you only want to work if you get paid what YOU think you’re worth, that changes the equation. I guess for those folks, 99 weeks of unemployment, their parent’s spare room and other welfare programs look pretty good.

Now, I am not heartless. I am speaking here of young people 18+ through 25 or so who haven’t launched as yet (the original topic of this thread).


37 posted on 03/25/2011 7:43:31 AM PDT by hal ogen (1st amendment or reeducation camp?)
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To: Cronos

Yes, but Alexander engaged his life, made decisions and made a living, so to speak. He just didn’t sit back and moan about the stress and the responsibility...and play video games.


38 posted on 03/25/2011 7:45:40 AM PDT by hal ogen (1st amendment or reeducation camp?)
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To: Cronos

So that meant even more pressure for young people to make something of them selves. They didn’t have much time.


39 posted on 03/25/2011 7:48:04 AM PDT by hal ogen (1st amendment or reeducation camp?)
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To: ClearCase_guy
You have good points, however, do note that the world has changed since the 50s. Why it's even changed since the 90s (I don't remember having any need to have a telephone when growing up and the internet came when I was just about finishing school)

Let's take your points one by one:


40 posted on 03/25/2011 7:56:33 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin+Jindal: 2012)
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To: hal ogen; GlockThe Vote
If they can’t afford to live on their own, they should find several similar-situation roommates

True. Did that, first had to bunk with an college in a small one-room apartment. Then 6 in a two bedroom. Then 2 in a two bedroom. Finally could rent a place on my own and finally saved enough to put a down-payment on an apartment (but that was post-marriage when we wanted a place!)

. Also, why stop at working 40 hours per week? There are 168 hours per week available to each of us. Give 8 hours per day for sleep, 2 1/2 hours per day for eating and 1 hour per day of personal hygiene that leaves about 87 1/2 hours for work each week...earning $$$$$

Done that too -- and invested the money. Yes, it was worth it. Also, you can put in 80-100 hour weeks only when you're in your twenties or thirties. I think once you have a family, wife/husband and kids, it is too difficult and too much of a toll on your health.

But, it was worth it -- I can now afford a better quality of life for my family.

41 posted on 03/25/2011 8:05:11 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin+Jindal: 2012)
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To: hal ogen
He just didn’t sit back and moan about the stress and the responsibility...and play video games

True. Video games and MPP are highly addictive and an utter waste of time.

So that meant even more pressure for young people to make something of them selves. They didn’t have much time. -- well, 17 was not young. By the age of 17 in 300 BC you would have been married, with kids, have been working for at least 5 years and also might have killed a few

however -- you would be living in one home with your parents, uncles, cousins and grandparents and maybe great-grandparents -- there was no individuals going out on their own, not even an atomic family going out on their own. It was a different world.

42 posted on 03/25/2011 8:07:54 AM PDT by Cronos (Palin+Jindal: 2012)
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To: hal ogen

Many are still in college at 23-24, so it can be hard to really launch until 25.

I didn’t get my post-college job until 24, thank goodness before the economy tanked a few years ago.

Now, if you are not launching and 27-28 out of school, that’s a problem.

Frankly, I wish I had stayed home for six months to save up some money once I started that job. It’s hard to save money when the car breaks, wife gets sent to the ER etc.


43 posted on 03/25/2011 8:15:39 AM PDT by rwfromkansas ("Carve your name on hearts, not marble." - C.H. Spurgeon)
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To: DennisR

I have a decent job and am married, launching pretty much right out of college.

The only issue is...my wife wants kids. I am not sure if we can afford them.

The budget calculators online say to plan for $500 a month. Is that realistic?


44 posted on 03/25/2011 8:21:14 AM PDT by rwfromkansas ("Carve your name on hearts, not marble." - C.H. Spurgeon)
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To: ClearCase_guy; decimon; GlockThe Vote; ladyvet; hal ogen

Frankly, wasn’t multi-generational households the norm not that far back ago?

My dad recently ‘lost’ his house (sold it to pay for repairs of the sewer line and foundation), and is now living with my family.

My in-laws (in their 60’s and 70’s), have had my grand-mother-in-law move in with them, as she’s in her 90’s.

You take care of family. Period.


45 posted on 03/25/2011 8:34:20 AM PDT by Ro_Thunder (I sure hope there is a New Morning in America soon. All this hope and change is leaving me depressed)
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To: Ro_Thunder

I agree.


46 posted on 03/25/2011 9:00:57 AM PDT by ladyvet ( I would rather have Incitatus then the asses that are in congress today.)
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