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Low vitamin D in kids may play a role in anemia
Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions ^ | May 1, 2011 | Unknown

Posted on 05/01/2011 6:08:29 PM PDT by decimon

News tips from the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies, April 30-May 3, Denver, Colo.

Pediatricians from Johns Hopkins Children's Center and elsewhere have discovered a link between low levels of vitamin D and anemia in children.

The findings, presented on May 1 at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in Denver, Colo., show that vitamin D deficiency may play an important role in anemia.

Anemia, which occurs when the body has too few oxygen-carrying red blood cells, is diagnosed and tracked by measuring hemoglobin levels. Symptoms of mild anemia include fatigue, lightheadedness and low energy. Severe and prolonged anemia can damage vital organs by depriving them of oxygen.

To examine the relationship between hemoglobin and vitamin D, the researchers looked at data from the blood samples of more than 9,400 children, 2 to 18 years of age. The lower the vitamin D levels, the lower the hemoglobin and the higher the risk for anemia, the researchers found. Children with levels below 20 nanograms per milliliter (ng/ml) of blood had a 50 percent higher risk for anemia than children with levels 20 ng/ml and above. For each 1 ng/ml increase in vitamin D, anemia risk dropped by 3 percent.

Only 1 percent of white children had anemia, compared with 9 percent of black children. Black children also had, on average, much lower vitamin D levels (18) than white children (27). Researchers have long known that anemia is more common in black children, but the reasons for this remain unclear, although some suspect that biologic and genetic factors may be at play.

The new findings, however, suggest that low vitamin D levels in black children may be an important contributor to anemia.

"The striking difference between black and white children in vitamin D levels and hemoglobin gives us an interesting clue that definitely calls for a further study," said lead investigator Meredith Atkinson, M.D., M.H.S., a pediatric nephrologist at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center.

While the findings show a clear link between low vitamin D levels and anemia, they do not prove that vitamin D deficiency causes anemia, the investigators caution.

###

Other institutions involved in the research were Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Albert Einstein College of Medicine of New York.


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: anemia; d; vitamind

1 posted on 05/01/2011 6:08:32 PM PDT by decimon
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To: neverdem; DvdMom; grey_whiskers; Ladysmith; Roos_Girl; Silentgypsy; conservative cat; ...

Ping


2 posted on 05/01/2011 6:09:32 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon
You are the sunshine vitamin D guy, decimon. :) Thanx !
3 posted on 05/01/2011 6:17:06 PM PDT by steelyourfaith (If it's "green" ... it's crap !!!)
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To: decimon

Which forms of vitamin D were they testing for? There are more than one, D3 and D6 mainly.


4 posted on 05/01/2011 6:23:20 PM PDT by allmost
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To: steelyourfaith
You are the sunshine vitamin D guy, decimon.

I've been called 'sunshine' but with more than a touch of sarcasm. ;-)

5 posted on 05/01/2011 6:28:20 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

Interesting....but, why do boys seems to have anemia more than girls when they are young? (That’s what I’ve observed.)


6 posted on 05/01/2011 6:38:19 PM PDT by goodnesswins (Unlike the West, the Islamic world is serious.)
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To: allmost
Let me be the first to call myself an idiot D2 and D3.
7 posted on 05/01/2011 6:41:09 PM PDT by allmost
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To: FReepers
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8 posted on 05/01/2011 6:42:14 PM PDT by DJ MacWoW (America! The wolves are at your door! How will you answer the knock?)
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To: allmost
Which forms of vitamin D were they testing for?

This article doesn't say so I don't know.

There are more than one, D3 and D6 mainly.

As supplement, I'm familiar with D2 and D3. D2 used to be the common supplement but has been replaced by D3 as D3 is the form we make naturally and is so thought to be better utilized. I recently posted something with the opinion that D2 may be as beneficial as D3.

That summarizes my readings on the matter.

9 posted on 05/01/2011 6:44:09 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

Tried to edit my incorrect response in post #7. This info, even speculation, is great. Bump.


10 posted on 05/01/2011 6:47:08 PM PDT by allmost
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To: allmost
Let me be the first to call myself an idiot D2 and D3.

Yeah, it's always good to preempt the detractors. ;-)

11 posted on 05/01/2011 6:47:54 PM PDT by decimon
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To: goodnesswins
...why do boys seems to have anemia more than girls when they are young?

I think it's the puppy dogs tails.

12 posted on 05/01/2011 6:51:56 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

I wonder if sitting indoors, playing video games and sucking down the Mountain Dew, has anything to do with this?


13 posted on 05/01/2011 6:52:47 PM PDT by bigheadfred (Beat me, Bite me...Make Me Write Bad Checks)
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To: decimon
Yeah, self deprecation. I was thinking about fish oil when I responded. The internal receptors in our bodies will overload one and neglect(reject) the other from my understanding. Supplements can be dangerous.
14 posted on 05/01/2011 6:59:30 PM PDT by allmost
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To: bigheadfred
I wonder if sitting indoors, playing video games and sucking down the Mountain Dew, has anything to do with this?

Could be, but then rickets was a common problem before they began fortifying foods with vitamin D.

15 posted on 05/01/2011 7:08:37 PM PDT by decimon
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To: allmost
The internal receptors in our bodies will overload one and neglect(reject) the other from my understanding. Supplements can be dangerous.

I'm currently taking 5000IU of vitamin D daily. My multi-vitamin-mineral-whatever pill has no large dosages as I want it to be a supplement for what I might be missing and not a replacement. I might change my mind later but that's what I'm currently doing.

16 posted on 05/01/2011 7:16:04 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

You gonna answer my question? Which form of D?


17 posted on 05/01/2011 7:31:20 PM PDT by allmost
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To: decimon

How long have you been doing that? Be careful you may end up with Kidney stones.


18 posted on 05/01/2011 7:32:13 PM PDT by ThisLittleLightofMine
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To: allmost
You gonna answer my question? Which form of D?

I answered in post #9. I don't know because the article doesn't say and it has no link to any source.

19 posted on 05/01/2011 7:51:26 PM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

They’ve said for years 15 min of sunlight a day gives you enough Vit D, kids play outside, so what about that fact?


20 posted on 05/01/2011 8:10:59 PM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: decimon

Multiple forms often contend for the same receptors. Supplements can be weird. “take more vitamin D” can be risky for some people.


21 posted on 05/01/2011 8:13:12 PM PDT by allmost
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To: Beowulf9
They’ve said for years 15 min of sunlight a day gives you enough Vit D, kids play outside, so what about that fact?

The fact about that fact is that it's not a fact. The sun must be high in the sky for our skin to make vitamin D. In most of the United States the sun never gets high enough for much of the year.

22 posted on 05/01/2011 8:17:57 PM PDT by decimon
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To: allmost; decimon
Which forms of vitamin D were they testing for? There are more than one, D3 and D6 mainly.

PROVISIONAL INTERNATIONAL UNION OF PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY and INTERNATIONAL UNION OF BIOCHEMISTRY JOINT COMMISSION ON BIOCHEMICAL NOMENCLATURE* NOMENCLATURE OF VITAMIN D PDF

D6 is listed at the end of page 6, the last page.

25-hydroxy vitamin D test

You can find it written as 25(OH)vitamin D. Some docs aren't thrilled with its methodology. My guess is a problem with the reproducibility of results.

23 posted on 05/02/2011 8:42:51 AM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: neverdem

Thanks.

The D2 and D3 forms are all I’ve seen as dietary supplements. Don’t know where the other Ds would be found or if they are suitable as supplement.


24 posted on 05/02/2011 9:09:43 AM PDT by decimon
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To: decimon

Not surprised. Here in phx I’m sure we’re getting that sun, they aught to do a study to see whether we have kids with anemia much here.


25 posted on 05/02/2011 9:38:51 AM PDT by Beowulf9
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To: Beowulf9
Not surprised. Here in phx I’m sure we’re getting that sun, they aught to do a study to see whether we have kids with anemia much here.

Anemia could have many causes.

Here's something on vitamin D, season and latitude:

"Sun exposure Most people meet their vitamin D needs through exposure to sunlight [5,31]. Ultraviolet (UV) B radiation with a wavelength of 290-315 nanometers penetrates uncovered skin and converts cutaneous 7-dehydrocholesterol to previtamin D3, which in turn becomes vitamin D3 [9,32,33]. Season, geographic latitude, time of day, cloud cover, smog, skin melanin content, and sunscreen are among the factors that affect UV radiation exposure and vitamin D synthesis [33]. The UV energy above 42 degrees north latitude (a line approximately between the northern border of California and Boston) is insufficient for cutaneous vitamin D synthesis from November through February [5]; in far northern latitudes, this reduced intensity lasts for up to 6 months. In the United States, latitudes below 34 degrees north (a line between Los Angeles and Columbia, South Carolina) allow for cutaneous production of vitamin D throughout the year [27]." http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp

26 posted on 05/02/2011 9:46:31 AM PDT by decimon
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