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Weekly Cooking Thread ~ May 14, 2011 (Recipes)
FreeRepublic Cooks | May 14, 2011 | libertarian27

Posted on 05/14/2011 8:08:36 AM PDT by libertarian27

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Never work before breakfast; if you have to work before breakfast, eat your breakfast first. ~ Josh Billings ~

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May 14 - National Buttermilk Biscuit Day

May 15 - National Chocolate Chip Day

May 16 - National Coquilles St. Jacques Day

May 17 - National Cherry Cobbler Day

May 18 - National Cheese Soufflé Day

May 19 - National Devil's Food Cake Day

May 20 - National Quiche Lorraine Day

1 posted on 05/14/2011 8:08:40 AM PDT by libertarian27
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To: libertarian27; FrdmLvr; TN4Liberty; Daisyjane69; HungarianGypsy; SouthDixie; illiac; EQAndyBuzz; ...

Weekly Cooking Thread Ping List

*to be added/deleted - just post here or PM me

Recap of last week’s cooking thread:

Appetizer* 31 Spinach Chips
Appetizer* 46 I Can’t Believe It’s Not A Packaged Biscuit Appetizer
Dessert* 6 Nutmeg Sauce
Dessert* 22 mothering cake (various cakes for mom)
Dessert* 6 cinnamon rolls with pie crust
Dessert* 44 Peanut Butter (and Chocolate) Rice Krispie Treats
Meal* 3 Beef Burger Stroganoff
Meal* 8 Grannys Sunday Chicken
Meal* 15 Camarones a la Playa (Beachside Shrimp)
Meal* 20 Riverbend Camarones
Meal* 27 Chicken Alfredo Lasagna
Meal* 32 Tuna stuffed celery:
Meal* 50 Mom’s Salmon Patties
Side* 39 Mexican rice
Soup* 51 Italian Chicken Soup
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2716503/posts?page=71#71


2 posted on 05/14/2011 8:12:59 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: libertarian27
My Famous Yucatan Poke Chops:

Marinate nice chops in Buffalo brandR chipotle sauce
Salt and pepper.
Zest a lime over the chops.

Grill that bad boy, let the chop rest and enjoy as is or....

. You may serve with a tomatillo sauce. I use store bought, such as Herdez or La Victoria but add:

diced white onion, finely diced serrano peppers and cilantro.

Serve that on top.

Enjoy

3 posted on 05/14/2011 8:26:12 AM PDT by mylife
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4 posted on 05/14/2011 8:33:56 AM PDT by mylife
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To: mylife
Thanks for that recipe. Looks delicious.
5 posted on 05/14/2011 8:37:49 AM PDT by Flavious_Maximus
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To: libertarian27
I want you to know how much I look forward to this thread every week! Thanks for running and indexing it for us!

My daughter asked me for a few of our favorite family recipes this morning. I found this in the TOH Simple and Delicious issue a few years ago. It's always been a hit at our house:

BACON CHEESEBURGER PASTA

8 ounces uncooked penne pasta

1 pound ground beef

6 bacon strips, diced 1 can (10-3/4 ounces) condensed tomato soup, undiluted

1 cup (4 ounces) shredded cheddar cheese

Barbecue sauce and prepared mustard, optional

Cook pasta according to package directions. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, cook beef over medium heat until no longer pink; drain and set aside. In the same skillet, cook bacon until crisp; remove with a slotted spoon to paper towels. Discard drippings. Drain pasta; add to the skillet. Stir in the soup, beef and bacon; heat through. Remove from the heat and sprinkle with cheese. Cover and let stand for 2-3 minutes or until the cheese is melted. Serve with barbecue sauce and mustard if desired. Yield: 4-6 servings.

(note) Leave a good coating of bacon drippings in the pan, or add a couple tbs, if you want to. I usually do.

Nutrition Facts: 1 serving (1 each) equals 389 calories, 16 g fat (8 g saturated fat), 62 mg cholesterol, 565 mg sodium, 36 g carbohydrate, 2 g fiber, 25 g protein.

6 posted on 05/14/2011 8:38:44 AM PDT by FrdmLvr (Death to tyrants)
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To: libertarian27

Secured some first class provender at the farmers markets today. Rilletes, fresh bread, merguez sausage and veggies. French dinner with a bottle of wine.


7 posted on 05/14/2011 8:39:20 AM PDT by doodad
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To: FrdmLvr

Bacon Cheeseburger Pasta link:

http://www.tasteofhome.com/SiteSearch/FacetSearchResults.aspx?search=bacon%20cheeseburger%20pasta&st=2&vw=1&page=1&rs=10&sort=0&searchSource=hdrbox-Recipes


8 posted on 05/14/2011 8:42:29 AM PDT by FrdmLvr (Death to tyrants)
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To: Flavious_Maximus

It’s wonderful and its my variation on a Mexican classic.

I swear, the chipotle sauce and lime zest is all it needs, but..
Traditionally it gets the tomatillo sauce.


9 posted on 05/14/2011 8:42:45 AM PDT by mylife
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To: doodad

Mmmmm...Rilletes...


10 posted on 05/14/2011 8:44:03 AM PDT by mylife
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To: mylife

Pork chops are by far my favorite food....


11 posted on 05/14/2011 8:44:29 AM PDT by ErnBatavia (It's not the Obama Administration....it's the "Obama Regime".)
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To: ErnBatavia

I love Pork Chops! Rib Pork Chops are my favorite - way better than Center Cut ones IMHO....they are the ‘Ribeye’ of Pork.

I haven’t had pork chops in a while, the stores I go to have ‘enhanced’ pork and I hate that stuff....have to wait for the ‘earthy-crunchy’ “natural” pork chops to go on sale to get a decent chop that we all used to eat as just normal a few years ago, but now it’s called “natural” and holds a premium price.

I buy pork tenderloin mostly now - can still find decent sales of tenderloin that isn’t ‘enhanced-pumped’ to smithereens.....


12 posted on 05/14/2011 8:54:17 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: doodad

You may also like “Cretons”

Ingredients

1 1/4 pounds ground pork
3/4 cup finely chopped yellow onion
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon salt
3/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cloves(I use crushed coriander seed)
nd1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon(I use cayenne)
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
3/4 cup whole milk(I use half and half)
1/4 cup fine bread crumbs

Directions

In a large saute pan, add the pork a cook until no longer pink, about 3 minutes. Add the onions and garlic, and cook for 1 minute. Add the salt, pepper, cloves, cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg and cook for 1 minute. Add the milk and bread crumbs and cook for 3 minutes over medium heat, stirring to break up the meat. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the pork is very tender and most of the liquid is evaporated, about 1 hour and 15 minutes. Remove the lid and cook uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is thick and all the liquid is evaporated, about 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and adjust the seasoning, to taste.

Transfer to a decorative bowl or several smaller ramekins, smoothing the top with a rubber spatula. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate until well chilled and firm, at least 4 hours or overnight. Serve with thinly sliced French bread or toasted French bread croutons.

Personally I don’t like the Cinnamon and cloves, I prefer to add savory spices such as cayenne and Crushed coriander seed.

Enjoy


13 posted on 05/14/2011 8:58:18 AM PDT by mylife
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To: libertarian27; All

When I saw your post that included the National Food Days, I noticed Coquilles St. Jacques and realized I had no idea what it was, so I looked it up online, and was delighted to know that it was a shrimp and scallop dish, since shrimp and scallops are my favorite kinds of seafood.

I am wondering if this is perhaps a name they use in the south or even in the New Orleans area (since it is obviously a French name), because I have never seen it on the menu at any restaurants here, but I have seen Shrimp and Scallop Thermador, which is basically the same thing.

I will go find my recipe for it and type it up and post it later today for everyone to enjoy.


14 posted on 05/14/2011 9:01:00 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: ErnBatavia

I think you’ll like these.

They are outstanding without the sauce, and with the sauce.

One of my best recipes.

My only problem with the sauce is that the lime can get lost in the mix.

Without the sauce, the lime zest really “pops”


15 posted on 05/14/2011 9:02:33 AM PDT by mylife
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To: doodad
Cretons (breakfast pate)


16 posted on 05/14/2011 9:06:29 AM PDT by mylife
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To: All

Made this last night, came out quite good.

Chicken Picatta (chicken in lemon-caper sauce)

ingredients:

CHICKEN BREASTS, 4 (6-ounce), skinless, boneless.
SALT, 1/4 teaspoon.
BLACK PEPPER, 1/4 teaspoon.
FLOUR, 3 tablespoons, all-purpose
BUTTER, 1 tablespoons.
OLIVE OIL, 3 tablespoons.
CHICKEN BROTH, 1/2 cup.
LEMON JUICE, 1/4 cup.
WHITE WINE, 1/4 cup.
CAPERS, 2 tablespoons, drained .
PARSLEY, Flat Leaf, 3 tablespoons, minced.

directions:

1. Place CHICKEN between 2 sheets of plastic wrap or in a plastic bag and pound to an even thickness using a meat mallet or small heavy skillet.

2. Sprinkle CHICKEN evenly with SALT & PEPPER. Place FLOUR in a shallow dish; dredge CHICKEN in FLOUR.

3. Put OIL in a large skillet over medium-high heat.

4. When skillet is hot, add CHICKEN and cook 3 minutes. Turn CHICKEN over and cook for 2 minutes more.

5. To the pan with the CHICKEN, add the BROTH, LEMON JUICE, WINE and CAPERS; reduce heat to medium, and simmer 3 to 5 minutes, basting chicken occasionally with sauce.

6. Sprinkle CHICKEN with PARSLEY; cook 1 minute.

7. Remove CHICKEN from pan; keep warm.

8. Bring sauce to a boil; cook 2 to 5 minutes or until thick. Turn off the heat and add in 1 tablespoon BUTTER to bind the sauce together. Pour pan sauce over CHICKEN.

Bon appetit!


17 posted on 05/14/2011 9:11:07 AM PDT by OhhTee5
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To: OhhTee5

Sounds excellent,Savory and bright.


18 posted on 05/14/2011 9:15:26 AM PDT by mylife
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To: libertarian27
I made this for Mother's Day last week and it turned out great!

It's not my recipe, I got it from Pastry Parrot on YouTube.

Its also on her web page The Frugal; Chef

The only difference was I couldn't find a boneless pork loin(!) so I substituted one with a bone in. I also left out the bell pepper because Mrs p6 isn't fond of them.

Along with a loaf of bread in the bread machine it made the day smell fantastic and we had a wonderful Mother's Day dinner...and leftovers! Not many though, LOL!

Latin Style Pork Loin in the Slow Cooker

2 to 3 pound pork loin
Salt & Pepper
Garlic powder
Cumin
Dried thyme
1 white onion – sliced
1 bell pepper – sliced
1 bunch cilantro sprigs
1 – 15 oz. bottle salsa

Rinse the pork and pat dry it. Season both sides with salt, pepper, cumin, garlic and thyme.
Place pork in slow cooker. Add the onion, bell pepper, cilantro and salsa. Fill the empty salsa jar half way with water. Add to the pot.
Cook pork on low for 6 to 7 hours. Discard the cilantro stems and serve. Enjoy!
If you have left overs use them to make shredded pork tacos with fresh avocado salsa.

19 posted on 05/14/2011 9:17:26 AM PDT by prisoner6 (Right Wing Nuts bolt The Constitution together as the loose screws of the Left fall out!)
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To: Flamenco Lady

I have only ever seen Coquille St Jacque as a scallop dish since coquille is the French word for scallop. I live and grew up in the South and have never seen it. A really really good recipe for it can be found in Anthony Bourdain’s Les Halles cookbook. My go to recipe and should be online easy.


20 posted on 05/14/2011 9:22:40 AM PDT by doodad
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To: prisoner6

Excellent, but try a pork butt. its cheaper and has more flavor.

Man, I do this sort of thing all the time in a crock pot for taco and burrito fillings.

Delicious and so simple.


21 posted on 05/14/2011 9:23:44 AM PDT by mylife
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To: libertarian27
Staying in shrimp mode today

Classic Jambalaya (per Louis Messarveaux...and, yes, he was pure Cajun)

1 large pot or overlarge skillet, with cover
1 lb shrimp, peeled and deveined, 30-40 ct
1 lb Andouille sausage (or sweet Italian, if you don't like heat), cut into small cubes, bigger than diced
1 medium-large onion, well chopped
1 large bell pepper, well chopped (green, traditionally, but in reality any colour you like)
2-3 stalks celery, well chopped
1 full cup long-grain white rice, uncooked
16 oz shrimp or chicken stock (canned is ok, fresh is better)
6-8 oz tomato sauce
2 bay leaves
6 large cloves garlic, finely chopped (or 6 tsp minced garlic in oil)
2 tsp ground cumin (if you grind cumin seeds yourself, grind the day before using, trust me on this)
cajun seasoning (Tony Chachere or Zatarain's) to taste. Note: neither of these contain MSG.

In large pot, saute veggies uncovered, on medium, in 2-3 TBSP butter until soft, roughly 5 minutes.

Add sausage and brown it for 5 minutes.

Add garlic, cajun seasoning, rice, shrimp or chicken stock, tomato sauce and bay leaves. Stir well until mixed.

Bring pot to a boil, then cover and reduce heat to low. Cook for 15 minutes or until liquid is ALMOST (not completely!) gone. Tip: do NOT peek until 8 minutes have passed, then once every 2 minutes thereafter until condition above is met. Stir in the cumin at your first peek.

Stir in the shrimp, leaving 2 or 3 on top, re-cover, and cook until shrimp on top are pink throughout (could be 3-5 minutes, could be less -- you have to peek every minute or two).

Remove from heat. Drain any remaining liquid through a strainer. Serve in covered bowl along with French bread and butter. Have some ground cayenne available for those who like it spicy...or if you happen to have any Cajuns in the house.

Bon appetit, mes amis!

22 posted on 05/14/2011 9:23:56 AM PDT by SAJ (Zerobama -- a phony and a prick, therefore a dildo)
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To: mylife

MMMM thanks. That looks great.


23 posted on 05/14/2011 9:24:30 AM PDT by doodad
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To: libertarian27

Got some tongue today at the farmer’s market as well from a local rancher. I plan to brine it with a sour orange brine and then braise it down like conchinita for tacos.


24 posted on 05/14/2011 9:26:12 AM PDT by doodad
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To: SAJ

Here is my jambalaya. Cajun by way of the SC low country and tweeked a bit by me.

Critchfield Jambalaya

1 cup chopped onion
3 cloves garlic chopped
1 cup chopped bell pepper
1 cup chopped celery
1 large (32 oz at least) can crushed tomatoes
1 or 2 chopped hot peppers (your call on how hot a pepper and how much)
½ cup chopped parsley
2 cup or so chicken stock

1 cup chopped andouille sausage or ham or tasso
1lb chopped chicken
1 lb whole and peeled shrimp

Worcestershire sauce
soy sauce
hot sauce
rice

Sauté the vegetables until soft in a large pot that will be the finished cooking vessel. Deglaze with a bit of the stock and add the tomatoes. Keep a pinch or two of parsley for each serving to top and add the rest to the pot. Add more of stock and or water so that it is a bit thinner than you would want. Simmer on a back burner for at least 30 minutes.

In the meantime, brown the sausage and remove. Brown the chicken in the sausage pan and remove. Deglaze the pan with a little stock and add the meats (except shrimp) and deglazed elements to the tomato mix. Stir and simmer until desired thickness, about a half hour. Should be chili thick, but not your Mom’s idea of chili, i.e. no Skyline gravy. Add a half tsp of soy, a tbsp of Worcestershire and Tabasco to taste. Adjust as needed, but no more soy. It skews the flavor too much.

Now as for rice, there are three ways to think about it. You can add water to the stew in an amount 1.5 the amount of rice and a tad more, bring to boil, cover and cook 35 minutes before checking. This is the most risky.

Next, you could make a risotto with the stew as your liquid being added to the rice. Second easiest, but easy to make gummy if not careful. You know how to make risotto though.

Easiest is to make rice on the side and add to pot as desired.

Once rice is incorporated, no matter how, add the shrimp on the top of the contents, cover and cook about five minutes until shrimp are done. Give it a good stir.

Serve in bowl, sprinkle of parsley and extra hot sauce on the side and French bread.

Laissez les bon temps rouler!


25 posted on 05/14/2011 9:31:10 AM PDT by doodad
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To: prisoner6

Carnitas make a great filling for your tacos, tortas and burritos. They are chewy with crispy pieces on the outside. Carnitas are also tasty alone or with a little crema and salsa.
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 3 hours
Total Time: 3 hours, 15 minutes
Ingredients:

3 lbs pork (shoulder or butt)
5 cloves of garlic, peeled
1 bay leaf (laurel)
1 onion, peeled and quartered
3 cups orange juice
Broth to cover meat
Lard or oil for frying
salt to taste

Preparation:
In a large pot, brown the pork on both sides. Carefully add in the orange juice, then add broth to cover meat. Add in garlic, bay leaf and the onion. Bring the liquid to a boil then turn it down to a simmer for 2 1/2 hours. At the end of the cooking time, turn up the heat to help evaporate the excess liquid. When the liquid is gone, and just the fat is left, use tongs to break up the meat into smaller chunks (think golf-ball size or smaller) and begin to fry them in the remaining fat. Add a few sprinkles of salt while you are doing this.

The pork is ready when the edges of the chunks become browned and crispy. You can serve it as-is in the larger chunks, or you can remove it from the pot and chop it up (using a clever or two clever’s) into smaller pieces to use as a filling for tacos or burritos.

I like this with fresh diced white onion,diced serranos,cilantro and a squeeze of lime on top.

Salsa Verde is also an appropriate finish.


26 posted on 05/14/2011 9:32:39 AM PDT by mylife
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To: OhhTee5

There is NOTHING better than Chicken Picatta. Your recipe sounds like it has all the right ingredients!


27 posted on 05/14/2011 9:33:40 AM PDT by smalltownslick
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To: mylife

My husband’s family is French Canadian, and he’s talked about this for many years. Unfortunately he had the name wrong. He’s very excited that I’m going to try it. Apparently it was a regular item on his mother’s table.


28 posted on 05/14/2011 9:36:25 AM PDT by rexiesmom
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To: prisoner6
Carnitas


29 posted on 05/14/2011 9:36:59 AM PDT by mylife
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To: rexiesmom; MS.BEHAVIN

I found out about it from MsBehavin, a French Acadian


30 posted on 05/14/2011 9:41:14 AM PDT by mylife
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To: doodad
Sounds very good -- kind of similar, but enough difference to be well worth a try.

I asked Louis once why he didn't use whole tomatos and why he was sparing with the tomato sauce. His reply, rendered as accurately as possible, "De shrimp are no' fond of de acid".

Also, I made a typo in the recipe. Should read: 1-2 tsp ground cumin. Me, I love cumin, so the more the better, but 2 tsps might be overkill for some folks, esp. Yankees...    ;^)

31 posted on 05/14/2011 9:42:10 AM PDT by SAJ (Zerobama -- a phony and a prick, therefore a dildo)
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To: doodad
Excellent. Tacos de Lengua are tasty.


32 posted on 05/14/2011 9:46:09 AM PDT by mylife
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To: SAJ

I’m not so sure shrimp no fonda da acid.

I do them as a scampi.
I get olive oil going in a skillet, add garlic and red pepper flakes and let that bloom, then add crushed tomato and white wine. Reduce the sauce.
Add butter to thicken the sauce. Add the shrimp.

Plate over linguini with garlic bread on the side


33 posted on 05/14/2011 9:54:26 AM PDT by mylife
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Shrimp Scampi


34 posted on 05/14/2011 9:55:45 AM PDT by mylife
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To: mylife
try a pork butt. its cheaper and has more flavor.

Yes. Come to think of it that's what I did use. We went to two local supermarkets and couldn't find boneless pork loin so I used the pork butt instead.

I think Carnitas are on Pastry Parrot's website too. They looked YUMMY! Maybe next weekend...!

35 posted on 05/14/2011 10:06:13 AM PDT by prisoner6 (Right Wing Nuts bolt The Constitution together as the loose screws of the Left fall out!)
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To: mylife
He never explained any further than that. I thought of scampi, too (which he did make), but == although he was a great guy == he REALLY didn't like being questioned on cooking. And he always had a wooden spoon with him, which was NOT used for stirring... That sucker stung, too.

No reason to question him though. His food was unbelievably good.

36 posted on 05/14/2011 10:07:00 AM PDT by SAJ (Zerobama -- a phony and a prick, therefore a dildo)
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To: doodad

I like tongue just boiled and sliced. Hubby won’t have it in the house so haven’t had it in years. Fickle. I also miss sweetbreads and brains, etc. but you just can’t find innards in the store now days.


37 posted on 05/14/2011 10:08:44 AM PDT by bgill (Kenyan Parliament - how could a man born in Kenya who is not even a native American become the POTUS)
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To: All

Recipe: Vietnamese Sugar Cane Shrimp (Chao Tom)

Ingredients:

1 1/2 pound raw shrimp (smaller shrimp)
3 cloves garlic
1/8 teaspoon salt
1/2 tablespoon sugar
3 dashes fish sauce
1 egg white, beaten until frothy
2 dashes white pepper powder
2 teaspoons lard or cooking oil
Sugar cane (skin peeled and quartered into 5-inch length)

Method:

Rinse and devein the shrimp and pat dry the shrimp thoroughly with paper towels. Put the shrimp, garlic, white pepper, lard/cooking oil into a food processor and blend well to form a smooth paste. Transfer the shrimp paste into a bowl.

Beat the egg white with an electronic hand beater(I use a food processor) until frothy. Combine the shrimp paste with beaten egg white and blend well. Chill in the refrigerator for 30 minutes and then divide the shrimp paste into four (4) equal portions.

Oil both hands and wrap the shrimp paste around the sugar cane. Shape them nicely and leave 1.5 inch of the sugar cane exposed. Heat up a wok of oil and deep fry(I oil them and do them on the grill *charcoal is best*) the chao tom until golden brown. Serve immediately.

(I like to serve them with lettuce for wrappers along with Thai basil, sprouts, julienned cucumber and carrot. Pull the shrimp into chunks by hand and roll them up with the other stuff like a burrito in the Lettuce then dip in the sauce as you eat)


38 posted on 05/14/2011 10:11:45 AM PDT by mylife
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Chao Tom


39 posted on 05/14/2011 10:14:35 AM PDT by mylife
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To: SAJ

Hey, He likes it his way.

I’m sure it rocks!


40 posted on 05/14/2011 10:17:51 AM PDT by mylife
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To: prisoner6

Thank the Lard! for Pork Butt!


41 posted on 05/14/2011 10:19:15 AM PDT by mylife
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To: libertarian27

Last week I purchased some food products from Shirley J (www.shirleyj.com) and have been VERY impressed with their versatility. The product line was developed years ago by a food scientist and has been used commercially ever since. A couple of years ago they decided to begin selling it to the home market.

If you’re not an inspired cook (and that definitely describes me!), they have a program called M30M or Master 30 Meals. This is the kit I purchased. It comes with all the Shirley J products needed to make 30 meals, a full color cookbook with photos, and 30 menus. The first one was BBQ Chicken Pizza (made with their sourdough bread mix and BBQ seasoning), a fantastic salad (the dressing included their Pasta & Pizza seasoning), and a fruit compote w/ vanilla sauce. Everything they sell can be used in dozens of different recipes and they’re reasonably priced.

Tonight is Day 2 of their 30 meal menu, and we’ll be making Turkey Chili, Corn Pudding, and a Key Lime Dessert Squares.

Before I bought the kit, I was using their chicken bouillon, which I really liked because it’s double strength and has great flavor. Their Universal Sauce can be used with just about anything from mac and cheese to enchiladas. You add the flavorings and other ingredients you want and have a different dish every night using the same sauce mix!

If you sign up as one of their sellers, you can get the M30M kit for $105 and then get a discount on your own purchases. If any of your friends buy the products through you, I think you get a commission.

So far, I really like what I’ve tried and the fact that each product can be used in so many different ways.


42 posted on 05/14/2011 10:20:29 AM PDT by ChocChipCookie (Jonah is my patron saint.)
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To: doodad

I don’t speak French, so I didn’t know that coquille was how you say scallop in French, but that would make sense. When I looked online some of the recipes were for just scallops and some were for a combination of scallops and shrimp.


43 posted on 05/14/2011 10:22:46 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: All

Okay, Here is my recipe for Seafood Thermador. It looks complicated, but it really is easy to make.

Seafood Thermador
(or Coquilles St. Jacques if you use just Scallops)

1 ½ -2 pounds of cooked seafood (shrimp, scallops, lobster, and/or crab) You can use just one kind or a combination

Cream Sauce with Sauteed Mushrooms (see recipes below)

Bread Crumbs

Parmesan Cheese

Parsley or chives

Place seafood in the bottom of a buttered 9X13 casserole dish or in individual size serving dishes.

Pour Cream Sauce with Sauteed Mushrooms over the top of the seafood. Top with a layer each of bread crumbs, then parmesan cheese and then a touch of parsley or chives as a garnish.

Place under the broiler just long enough to toast up the breadcrumbs and melt the parmesan cheese.

Sauteed Mushrooms

1-2 tablespoons butter
¼ -1/2 of an onion, grated
8-12 oz. fresh sliced mushrooms
splash of dry white wine

Sauté onion and mushrooms in the butter until tender, and finish with a splash of dry white wine. Set aside and cover with a lid so they stay warm while you make the cream sauce.

Cream Sauce

2- tablespoons butter
2- tablespoons flour
1 ¾ c heavy cream
½ tsp. of nutmeg
Pinch of salt and white pepper
(I go easy on the salt because the parmesan cheese in the finished dish is very salty)

Melt butter on low heat and stir in flour and cook about a minute to get the flour taste out of the roux. Add heavy cream, nutmeg and seasonings. Cook on low to medium heat until sauce is thickened, stirring frequently (Watch this closely). When thickened to the desired consistency stir in the Sautéed Mushroom mixture and thoroughly combine them

Note: I usually sauté the raw shrimp and scallops in a bit of butter to cook them and boil the lobster and crab (save the water and throw in the shells from your seafood with an onion and make your own seafood stock too!)


44 posted on 05/14/2011 10:57:31 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: All

Earlier this week my stepson cooked up this soup for the family to try. This is a knock off of an Olive Garden Recipe and was absolutely delicious.

Zupa Toscana

Ingredients
1 pound bulk mild Italian sausage
(or hot Italian Sausage and leave out pepper flakes)
1-2 tsp. red pepper flakes (depending on how spicy you like your soup)
4 slices bacon, cut into 1/2 inch pieces
1 large onion, diced
1 tbs. minced garlic
8 ½ -9 cups chicken broth or 5 about cans
6 potatoes, thinly sliced
1 cup heavy cream
¼ -1/2 of a bunch fresh spinach with the tough stems removed (We used some chopped up cabbage instead of the spinach, since my husband won’t eat anything with spinach in it and it was excellent in it.)

Directions

Cook the Italian sausage and red pepper flakes in a Dutch oven over medium-high heat until crumbly, browned, and no longer pink, about 10 to 15 minutes. Drain and set aside.

Cook the bacon in the same Dutch oven over medium heat until crisp, about 10 minutes. Drain, leaving a few tablespoons of drippings with the bacon in the bottom of the Dutch oven. Stir in the onions and garlic; cook until onions are soft and translucent, about 5 minutes.

Pour the chicken broth into the Dutch oven with the bacon and onion mixture; bring to a boil over high heat. Add the potatoes, and boil until fork tender, about 15-20 minutes.

Reduce the heat to medium and stir in the heavy cream and the cooked sausage; heat through. Mix the spinach (or cabbage) into the soup just before serving.

Serve with Parmesan cheese and crusty garlic bread and enjoy!


45 posted on 05/14/2011 11:06:51 AM PDT by Flamenco Lady
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To: ChocChipCookie

That looks interesting but I couldn’t get onto the ShirleyJ site (something is wrong with it- at least on my end)

But it got me to thinking that it would be easy to make up dry mixes for sauces - and I bumped into this site with some recipes:
http://www.oldfashionedhomecooking.net/2010/01/make-your-own-dry-cream-soup-mix.html

Even has a recipe for homemade “gravy master” (and I’ve been cheating once in a while using gravy master lately -shh, don’t tell anyone)


46 posted on 05/14/2011 11:17:56 AM PDT by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: doodad
Can you give me an idea how much this makes? I make my own jambalaya but mostly for block parties or family gatherings. It's prepared in the LARGE pot outdoors on a turkey fryer so yes, it makes A LOT!

Mrs p6 often doesn't want me to cook because she claims I can only cook for large crowds.

Think deep fried turkey or Burgoo.

In any case at the moment it would be just her and me and our youngest son so figure at least 4 people. Youngest son can eat for ....several.

It will also be my first attempt at using shrimp because I am not that crazy about seafood although I do eat it from time to time.

47 posted on 05/14/2011 11:27:02 AM PDT by prisoner6 (Right Wing Nuts bolt The Constitution together as the loose screws of the Left fall out!)
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To: doodad

I should have added my instinct is to basically double the recipe. We like leftovers.


48 posted on 05/14/2011 11:29:38 AM PDT by prisoner6 (Right Wing Nuts bolt The Constitution together as the loose screws of the Left fall out!)
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To: libertarian27; happydogx2; glock rocks; NormsRevenge

Friend of ours caught a 50# Halibut off shore yesterday on top of the freezer full of Razor Clams plus Salmon season opens today. Should we send him a box of chocolates ?


49 posted on 05/14/2011 12:07:55 PM PDT by tubebender (A perfectly good tagline used to reside here but our colorless Prez needed it for his campaign)
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To: prisoner6

It makes about 2 qts if memory serves. Lots of leftovers for three, but I would think with bread and such serves 6.


50 posted on 05/14/2011 12:38:12 PM PDT by doodad
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