Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Feral Camels Plague Australian Outback
Discovery News ^ | Tue May 17, 2011 | Jessica Marshall

Posted on 05/18/2011 12:20:27 AM PDT by LucyT

* Over one million feral camels live in arid and semi-arid regions of the Australian outback.

* The camels demolish air conditioners, fences and toilet systems and foul critical watering holes.

* A new program aims to track the camels by allowing people to report sightings using Google maps.

The single-humped dromedary camels were brought mainly from India in the second half of the 19th century to work in the scrubby, red-earthed arid parts of the Australian outback, transporting people and as pack animals. Once trains, roads and machinery made them obsolete as workers, the camels were let loose, creating the world's only population of wild camels.

Since then their population has doubled every eight or nine years.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.discovery.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Outdoors; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: australia; camel; camels; dromedary; feral; outback
The program adds another species to the list of programs tracking other feral animals in Australia, including rabbits, foxes and myna birds. Since CamelScan launched earlier this month, the public has logged nearly 150 sightings.
1 posted on 05/18/2011 12:20:31 AM PDT by LucyT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Fred Nerks; Jet Jaguar; Slings and Arrows; Rushmore Rocks; Brown Deer; SunkenCiv; grey_whiskers

.

Ping.

.


2 posted on 05/18/2011 12:24:08 AM PDT by LucyT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Perfect opportunity for a new fast food joint...McCamels...their slogan could be, “I’d Walk A Mile For a McCamel.”


3 posted on 05/18/2011 12:25:03 AM PDT by FrankR (A people that values its privileges above its principles will soon lose both.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT
Camel on bar-b-que! The Aussies have cheap meat for holidays.
4 posted on 05/18/2011 12:26:15 AM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: count-your-change; FrankR

Wonder what Camel tastes like.


5 posted on 05/18/2011 12:29:06 AM PDT by LucyT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

With over a million animals, they could harvest them down to a manageable herd of 2000 or 3000 animals on a preserve, and use the remainder of the feral herd for food instead of killing them and wasting them as they do now.


6 posted on 05/18/2011 12:32:35 AM PDT by Concho (-)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Since you asked:

Recipes using and preparing camel

SNIP . . Whether your camel dish is a success really depends on the state of the camel when it entered the abattoir.

aSNIP . . .Though camel meat can be cooked in almost any method in which you would cook lamb, (and it is a similar taste), the very best method is roasting.

7 posted on 05/18/2011 12:39:52 AM PDT by skeptoid (The road to serfdom is being paved by RINOs, and Lisa Murkowski is their mascot.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: FrankR

Very clever with the McCamel bit!!

They are supposedly mean beasties, even when domesticated.

Probably more lean meat than fatty meat. Would probably cook well like cabrito, with lots of marinade or sauce.


8 posted on 05/18/2011 12:44:22 AM PDT by octex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Somehow, they’ll get over this hump...


9 posted on 05/18/2011 1:10:15 AM PDT by Vendome ("Don't take life so seriously... You'll never live through it anyway")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Like someone walked a mile on it?


10 posted on 05/18/2011 1:28:37 AM PDT by count-your-change (You don't have be brilliant, not being stupid is enough.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: LucyT
Camel meat is absolutely delicious.

The export of camels from Australia to Saudi Arabia and the rest of the sandbox is big business, along with lamb and mutton.

11 posted on 05/18/2011 2:48:04 AM PDT by Kenny Bunk (We live in America's "Awkward" Era. Too late to fix the country. To early to start shooting.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Chicken.


12 posted on 05/18/2011 3:13:34 AM PDT by Jonty30
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Bloody Sam Roberts

“Feral Camels Plague Australian Outback”

Oh nooooo! First it was the feral cats and now feral camels...oh noooo! :)


13 posted on 05/18/2011 3:41:25 AM PDT by Mrs. B.S. Roberts
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: FrankR
"Perfect opportunity for a new fast food joint...McCamels...their slogan could be, “I’d Walk A Mile For a McCamel.”

And when you order sugar in your coffee, they'll ask, "One hump or two?"

14 posted on 05/18/2011 3:43:54 AM PDT by SnuffaBolshevik
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

They would make good dog food.


15 posted on 05/18/2011 4:37:18 AM PDT by Venturer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

> Wonder what Camel tastes like.

Ask the sharks.


16 posted on 05/18/2011 4:41:14 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (Obama did not learn incompetence; he was born to it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Perhaps they could introduce a really, really large species of cane toads to eat the camels?


17 posted on 05/18/2011 7:43:07 AM PDT by Moltke (Always retaliate first.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mrs. B.S. Roberts

18 posted on 05/18/2011 9:32:49 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (A "Moderate Muslim"? Nothing more than a Muslim Extremist who has run out of ammo.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

“The camels demolish...toilet systems”. I’ll say. Have you ever tried to use a rest room after a camel has been in there? Filthy stinkin’ mess! Use all the toilet paper. Don’t flush. I think they even pee in the sink if there’s a couple of them in there at the same time.


19 posted on 05/18/2011 9:40:18 AM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

We had camels in AZ in the 1800’s. And, no, I don’t remember them.

http://www.azcentral.com/travel/articles/2011/02/07/20110207arizona-hi-jolly-camel-military.html


20 posted on 05/18/2011 1:45:27 PM PDT by azishot (Everyone is entitled to my opinion.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

"Uncivilized feral foreigners"

21 posted on 05/18/2011 2:00:07 PM PDT by Rebelbase
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Thirsty camels get the hump in Australia water search

Australia has the largest wild camel population on Earth
A remote Australian outback town is under siege from thousands of feral camels hunting for water as drought continues to grip parts of the country.

The thirsty dromedaries smashed water mains and invaded the local airstrip in Docker River, leaving residents too scared to venture outside.

The local council has been given extra money to cull the animals.

Officials plan to use helicopters to herd them outside the town’s borders, where they will be shot.

Local Government Minister Rob Knight said the town in the Northern Territory, with a population of just 350, was under siege from 6,000 marauding camels.

“They’ve actually come right into the community, smashing infrastructure, so it’s become a critical situation,” he said.

“They are smashing over water mains and intruding on the airstrip causing problems with medical evacuations.”

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8379008.stm


22 posted on 05/18/2011 5:12:07 PM PDT by Fred Nerks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: BuffaloJack

> Ask the sharks.

How would they know?


23 posted on 05/18/2011 8:32:20 PM PDT by LucyT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: LucyT
A new program aims to track the camels by allowing people to report sightings using Google maps.

Well, there's a solution that'll handle those buggers.

24 posted on 05/18/2011 10:13:23 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Fred Nerks; azishot; melancholy

25 posted on 05/18/2011 10:46:18 PM PDT by LucyT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

7 Things you really ought to know about Camel Anatomy

1. The Hump: Contrary to popular belief, the hump does not store water. Instead, it’s filled with fat, like a gravity-defying beer belly, which allows the camel to go for a month without food.
If the hump becomes depleted, it will shrink, flop over, and hang at the camel’s side.

2. The Nipples: Camel milk, the Bedouin beverage of choice, is more nutritious than cow milk, with more potassium, more iron, and three times as much vitamin C. In fact, Camel milk will soon become available in grocery stores across Europe. In the meantime, candy makers from Vienna are developing a chocolate camel milk for the kids.

3. The Nostrils: Camels can open and close their muscular nostrils at will, which prevents them from inhaling sand in the event of a sandstorm.

4. The Body Heat: When the outside temperature is higher than body temperature, most mammals sweat to cool off. But not the camel. To avoid sweating, its body temperature will rise up to 11 degrees, which is the primary way that camels conserve water in the desert. In fact, camels often huddle together to stay cool because their body temperature is often less than the outside air.

5. The Excretions: Camels also conserve water by producing concentrated urine and dry dung.

6. The Feet: When the thick, leathery pads of a camel’s foot hit the ground, they spread wide, preventing the camel from sinking into the sand.

7. Those Long Legs: When a camel walks, it moves both legs on one side and the both legs on the other, rocking side-to-side. This is why camels are nicknamed “The ships of the desert.” Camel legs are incredibly strong, which allows them to carry up to 1000 pounds. They also can walk 100 miles per day and sprint at 12 miles per hour.

http://naturalacts.blogspot.com/2008/04/7-things-you-really-ought-to-know-about.html


26 posted on 05/18/2011 11:45:56 PM PDT by Fred Nerks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

processing feral camel meat in the Northern Territory.

27 posted on 05/18/2011 11:50:10 PM PDT by Fred Nerks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Fred Nerks

Heh, tmi!


28 posted on 05/19/2011 12:22:24 AM PDT by LucyT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Fred Nerks
Now this is interesting, thanks!:

Camel milk, the Bedouin beverage of choice, is more nutritious than cow milk, with more potassium, more iron, and three times as much vitamin C. In fact, Camel milk will soon become available in grocery stores across Europe. In the meantime, candy makers from Vienna are developing a chocolate camel milk for the kids.

How does their body produce this level of nutrition with their apparently poor diet?

29 posted on 05/19/2011 12:28:01 AM PDT by LucyT
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Two-legged camels are a bigger problem.


30 posted on 05/19/2011 12:30:03 AM PDT by cynwoody
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: LucyT

Camels’ vital role in supporting human populations in some of the poorest and frequently drought-stricken areas of the world has now been widely acknowledged (Hjort af Ornäs, 1988). Droughts in Africa, India and Mongolia over the past decade have demonstrated that camel ownership can give pastoralists an excellent chance for survival as the advanced physiology of a camel allows it to go one month without water and continue to produce milk on the poorest of diets. While entire herds of cattle, sheep and goats succumb to arid conditions, camel populations survive relatively unscathed. Consequently, some pastoral groups with deeply ingrained traditions of cattle herding, such as the Samburu in northern Kenya, started to acquire camels (Sperling, 1987), a fact which has come to the attention of development agencies and international organizations.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camel_milk


31 posted on 05/19/2011 1:42:14 AM PDT by Fred Nerks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson