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PC Boot-up Time Reduced by Half With 8GB SSD, Software
TechOn! ^ | 06-07-2011 | Tomohisa Takei, Nikkei Electronics

Posted on 06/08/2011 2:00:19 PM PDT by Red Badger

Diskeeper Corp developed "ExpressCache," software that enhances operating speed of personal computers (PCs) by using a small-capacity SSD as a cache for HDD, and demonstrated it at Computex Taipei 2011.

In the demonstration, operations such as booting Windows 7 and launching applications were compared between a PC equipped with a 500-Gbyte HDD (5,400rpm) and a PC using the same hardware in addition to an 8-Gbyte SSD for a cache (made by SanDisk Corp, connected via mSATA). As a result, the software and the SDD halved the time it takes to perform those operations.

ExpressCache is software that monitors the read/write operations of applications software and duplicates frequently-used data in an SSD. It operates as one of the components of Windows 7. Though an SSD with any capacity can be used as a cache, 4-Gbyte or higher capacity will be more effective than capacities lower than that.

"Considering the balance between the prices and effects of current SSDs, 8-Gbyte capacity might be the best," said Modesto Rodriguez, vice president, OEM Business Development of Diskeeper, which will sell ExpressCache to PC makers. "It's not that the operating speeds increase in proportion to the capacity of SSD. So, we expect that PC makers decide the capacity in consideration of the prices of SSDs."

At Computex Taipei 2011, Intel Corp announced a similar technology called "Smart Response Technology." Commenting on this technology, Rodriguez said, "ExpressCache has an advantage that it can be used with any types of SSDs and HDDs with any capacities and does not require any specific hardware configurations."

Intel said that Smart Response Technology can be used only with the Z68 chipset and is best used with a 20-Gbyte SSD.

"In addition, Intel uses SLC-based SSDs, which are expensive," Rodriguez said. "When ExpressCache is combined with an 8-Gbyte MLC-based SSD, the price of the SSD can be reduced to about 1/4."


TOPICS:
KEYWORDS: communications; computer; data; software

In the demonstration, by installing ExpressCache in a PC equipped with an 8-Gbyte SSD used as a cache, the time it takes to launch Windows 7 and applications software were reduced by half. The numbers shown on the displays are the time it takes to launch them. Only the right PC is equipped with the SSD.

1 posted on 06/08/2011 2:00:23 PM PDT by Red Badger
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To: ShadowAce

Ping!................


2 posted on 06/08/2011 2:00:47 PM PDT by Red Badger (Nothing is a 'right' if someone has to give it to you................)
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To: Red Badger

No special software required. If you boot from an SSD, you will be amazed at the boot time. At work I have a Windows 2000 system that cold boots to the windows desktop in under 5 seconds.


3 posted on 06/08/2011 2:03:47 PM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Red Badger
operations such as booting Windows 7 and launching applications were compared between a PC equipped with a 500-Gbyte HDD (5,400rpm)

Well THAT'S part of the problem. I use a 10K RPM disk for my system partition, and my boot time is under 20 seconds.

Granted, I'm using Ubuntu with a high-end system, but I'm assuming by the picture that this test was done on laptops where 7200 RPM disks are a little pricier.

4 posted on 06/08/2011 2:04:27 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Red Badger

My m11x with SSD smokes on boot-up....fast.


5 posted on 06/08/2011 2:04:49 PM PDT by cranked
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To: rarestia

ssds are still too rich for my blood. I’ll probably go with a hybrid drive for my next box.


6 posted on 06/08/2011 2:05:30 PM PDT by utherdoul
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To: Red Badger

What’s an SSD for us dummies?


7 posted on 06/08/2011 2:07:26 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: Red Badger
Computer Geek YouTube Video: Samsung SSD Awsomness
8 posted on 06/08/2011 2:07:57 PM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: knarf

I suspect it stands for Solid State Drive but I have no idea what “SLD” means.

I have an 8 GB thumb drive. Can I set up my PC to use that at bootup time?


9 posted on 06/08/2011 2:11:15 PM PDT by Tarantulas ( Illegal immigration - the trojan horse that's treated like a sacred cow)
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To: knarf

SSD = Solid State Disk or Drive. Fast like RAM in your computer and no moving parts. Also, rather pricey per gigabyte. At this point, they are not a reliable as the standard disk drive, but they are getting better.


10 posted on 06/08/2011 2:12:57 PM PDT by Mr. Jazzy (The United States Marine Corps, your greatest friend or your worst enemy. YOU choose.)
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To: Red Badger; Ernest_at_the_Beach; ShadowAce; SunkenCiv

Imagine how fast Linux or OSX would boot on SSD. Yikes.


11 posted on 06/08/2011 2:14:18 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: Red Badger

I just bought a new SandyBridge laptop (4x i7 cores with hyper threading). We replaces the 2x 340gig hard-drives with 2x 256gig SSD’s. — It’s amazingly fast.

I use it for on-location video work. It can render multi-cam projects faster than real time. (a lot of that has to do with read/write times.

I sure would like to see more of those hybrids, I could certainly use cheaper/larger internal drives.


12 posted on 06/08/2011 2:15:21 PM PDT by ResearchMonkey (Holding Conservative Country in California.)
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To: utherdoul

Agreed! SATA 6G with a 10K RPM disk will provide way faster access speed than most have seen in recent years. Since 7200 RPM is the standard, folks are used to the 20-30 second boot time, but with SSD still running way too high compared to rotational disk with higher disk space, I’ll stick with the old platters.

Besides, if you’re using a 64-bit OS and have at least a dual-core proc and over 6 GB of RAM, the disk is only an issue on boot. After that, most everything is cached and accessed from physical memory. I turned off swap files after going 64-bit, and my disk doesn’t get accessed much anymore.


13 posted on 06/08/2011 2:16:24 PM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Red Badger; All
To shorten your startup time, you might want to check out this software called Soluto. The software is still in the beta state, but I have really trimmed the start up time on my computer. Here is their web site:

http://www.soluto.com/
14 posted on 06/08/2011 2:16:57 PM PDT by Mr. Jazzy (The United States Marine Corps, your greatest friend or your worst enemy. YOU choose.)
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To: martin_fierro

Well, look at the MacBook Air.


15 posted on 06/08/2011 2:17:17 PM PDT by montyspython (This thread needs more cowbell)
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To: Red Badger

Have a 500 megabyte drive, W7, Quadcore, 8 gigs of RAM....15 seconds from off to fully functional.


16 posted on 06/08/2011 2:21:37 PM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2011)
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To: knarf

What’s an SSD for us dummies?
***************************************
“solid state device” ,, electronic memory ... faster than magnetic memory as there is no wait for rotation or seek.. I had SSD back in 1982 ,, StorageTEK SSD “drum” units attached to a IBM 3081 as paging devices.


17 posted on 06/08/2011 2:21:51 PM PDT by Neidermeyer
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To: Red Badger

Have a 500 gigabyte drive, W7, Quadcore, 8 gigs of RAM....15 seconds from off to fully functional.


18 posted on 06/08/2011 2:22:01 PM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2011)
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To: Tarantulas
I have an 8 GB thumb drive. Can I set up my PC to use that at bootup time?

Probably, assuming your BIOS supports it (which it does unless you've got some pretty old kit). It's going to be very slow, however.

19 posted on 06/08/2011 2:47:25 PM PDT by Darth Reardon (No offense to drunken sailors)
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To: Red Badger

Solid State Drive or SSD is kinda like a USB flash drive but faster, much faster with no moving parts hence the solid state (no noise, less heat, small) versus you regular hard drive that spins a metal disk to store information on.

I bought 30gig SSD made by OCZ (vertex series SATA II 2.5” 80mb sustained write, I updated the firmware, etc...) just to try it out for about $70 on sale at newegg at the time.

I went to load Windows 7 Ultimate on it and walked away for about 10 minutes and came back to check on it and it was already done.

Then I loaded only my basic programs ex. FireFox on the new SSD and they loaded lightning fast, I mean fast. All other programs were loaded/linked onto the old regular Western Digital (black) 1.5TB hard drive for more or less a storage unit now but necessary to compliment the smaller 30gig SSD. I fly around the web and everything loads quicker. Boot up is less then 15 seconds with no special software.

The larger SSD drives are expensive still but is helping to drive down the price of the older technology. So, a small capacity SSD drive with a large storage regular drive is probably the way to go for now, I have about 10gigs of free space left on the SSD 30gig and Windows 7 needs about 20gigs just to install itself so it’s a minimal size with a decent cushion and I just move stuff over to the large drive for storage to keep the SSD from filling up. No trouble at all.

Overall a very nice upgrade without having to buy a new system and it would work well for a laptop upgrade as the SSD units are small.


20 posted on 06/08/2011 2:55:33 PM PDT by Razzz42
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To: Red Badger

Great! Now I can only watch two episodes of Seinfeld while Old Betsy is booting up.


21 posted on 06/08/2011 3:05:30 PM PDT by Cyman
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To: Red Badger

My Windows 7 boots to the start application in under a minute.


22 posted on 06/08/2011 3:37:37 PM PDT by UB355 (Slower traffic keep right)
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To: Red Badger

tech bkmk


23 posted on 06/08/2011 3:46:25 PM PDT by Sergio (An object at rest cannot be stopped! - The Evil Midnight Bomber What Bombs at Midnight)
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To: UB355

It’s not only boot time, everything is faster.

I remember back in my geek days when I used to play Battlefield and other 3D shooters and constantly had to upgrade my system to keep up with the latest. Always adding more memory, new motherboards, faster processors, video cards and bus speeds... Nothing compared to when I bought my first WD Raptor 10,000 RPM, 36gb hard drive back in the day. Wow! Programs seemed to load instantly and the upgrade was immediately noticeable. Computer seemed like it tripled in speed.

Just bought a Corsair 128gb SSD and going to use it as my boot HD and put files on the 1TB drive.


24 posted on 06/08/2011 4:17:07 PM PDT by vlad335
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To: knarf

Solid State Drive......no moving parts.........


25 posted on 06/08/2011 5:47:15 PM PDT by Red Badger (Nothing is a 'right' if someone has to give it to you................)
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To: martin_fierro; Swordmaker

I’ve booted off flash drive before; even with some intervening crap (I think there was a floppy drive involved, to load the boot routine and USB driver), it was pretty danged fast. In the misspent youth days, booting an Apple IIgs off battery-backed-up memory card was so freaking fast (and silent) that we’d restart just to watch it again. And then the DMA SCSI cards came out, and those were fast. Of course, the entire OS fit on an 800K floppy...


26 posted on 06/08/2011 8:13:02 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Thanks Cincinna for this link -- http://www.friendsofitamar.org)
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; JosephW; ...

27 posted on 06/09/2011 4:40:22 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

To: rarestia
Well THAT'S part of the problem. I use a 10K RPM disk for my system partition, and my boot time is under 20 seconds.

I had a friend who booted off of dual 15K drives striped in a RAID 0, hooked to a pretty hefty SCSI RAID card with gobs of cache. It was impressive, everything was practically instant. Seems there's no limit to what people going for the ultimate gaming rig will do.

29 posted on 06/09/2011 8:05:29 AM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: antiRepublicrat

I had an HP SmartArray PCI card with 512MB cache in my old desktop server booting to three 300 GB 15K Ultra320 SCSI disks in a RAID5. Server 2003 took less than 10 seconds to come up to a login screen. With 32 GB RAM and two dual-core Intel procs, it could run just about anything, but my God did it just gobble up power!


30 posted on 06/09/2011 8:11:15 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: montyspython; martin_fierro
Well, look at the MacBook Air.

It takes 15 seconds.

But why would you ever shut it down (except for doing a big upgrade)? I only did to see how long it took. Takes about 5 seconds to shut down, BTW.

But, in normal use, you just open/close the lid. Instantaneous.

31 posted on 06/09/2011 8:18:49 AM PDT by B Knotts (Just another Tenther)
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To: Red Badger
I would imagine it would be useful for caching applications as well as just the OS. 

My Fedora workstation takes a while to boot and load KDE, but it is something that happens rarely enough that I don't give a damn.

 ~ :) uptime 10:57:30 up 153 days, 18:01, 18 users, load average: 1.04, 1.08, 1.08

Why not just use something that doesn't need to be booted every hour?

I have servers at work that have been up for more than 1300 days.

11:01am  up 1333 day(s), 19:23,  2 users,  load average: 1.21, 0.69, 0.56

That's more than 3 and a half years. Even if that server took 10 minutes to boot, (which it doesn't) it would still pay off.

32 posted on 06/09/2011 9:17:31 AM PDT by zeugma (The only thing in the social security trust fund is your children and grandchildren's sweat.)
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To: zeugma

I predict that the old HDD will soon go the way of the 5 1/4” FLOPPY, in favor of the SDD. Faster, more reliable, more secure...............


33 posted on 06/09/2011 10:14:57 AM PDT by Red Badger (Nothing is a 'right' if someone has to give it to you................)
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