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Why Japan Will Turn to Solar Energy Following Fukushima
OilPrice.com ^ | 10/06/2011 | John Daly

Posted on 06/10/2011 7:42:19 AM PDT by bananaman22

As the dire news continues to leach out of Fukishima, the silver lining in its nuclear cloud is that renewable energy technologies, despite their daunting start-up costs, are receiving renewed scrutiny.

Make no mistake - given the trillions of dollars invested over the last five decades in nuclear energy, the industry and its lobbyists will not go down without a fight, promoting new, “safe” reactor designs, etc. etc. etc.

But the Fukushima debacle has finally bared the industry’s darkest secret, it inability to manage its nuclear waste. The six reactor TEPCO Daichi Fukushima stored all its waste onsite, and the spent fuel rods and their lack of cooling have been a major contributor to the high radiation levels observed around the facility. Worse for nuclear power proponents has been the reluctant admission by TECPO that three of the complex’s six reactors apparently did in fact suffer a meltdown.

So, what’s next?

Hydroelectric facilities are a proven technology, but expensive and take years to construct.

Wind power also has substantial start-up costs, is erratic, and faces environmental opposition.

With the notable exception of bioethanol, little real money has gone into biofuel renewable, particularly in the U.S., where bioethanol produced from corn has a hammerlock on both subsidies and crop insurance, despite rising concerns about shifting land from food to energy production is driving up costs of foodstuffs. The leading contenders for bio-renewables, camelina, algae and jatropha, all are starved for investment as a result. Full article at: Why Japan will turn to Solar Energy


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: belongsinbloggers; fukushima; japan; nuclearenergy; solarenergy

1 posted on 06/10/2011 7:42:23 AM PDT by bananaman22
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To: bananaman22

Bad move IMO. It took an earthquake and Tsunami to bring down Fukishima. With solar, it will take.....night time.


2 posted on 06/10/2011 7:45:02 AM PDT by mmichaels1970
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To: bananaman22

If anything demonstrated the overall safety of nuclear power, the accidents in Japan did.


3 posted on 06/10/2011 7:46:34 AM PDT by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: bananaman22
Yeah, sure, solar is the answer! Every industrial society dependent upon reliable and powerful energy sources will shift to something that is neither!

The answer is to solve the problems with nuclear, such as going to Thorium reactors and actually building waste repositories - and also taking continengy planning seriously. In the post 9-11 U.S., I don't see a Fukishima happening - disaster planning is done in depth.

4 posted on 06/10/2011 7:46:53 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: bananaman22

Japan Needs Molten Thorium Salt reactors, heck all 1st world countries need them...

Either that or orbital solar.

Of course in the interim we need more oil and gas exploration.


5 posted on 06/10/2011 7:48:00 AM PDT by GraceG
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To: mmichaels1970

There is a place for solar - namely as a widely distributed resource on rooftops to supplement large-scale power sources. But not as a primary source of power.


6 posted on 06/10/2011 7:48:42 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy
There is a place for solar...

Agreed.
7 posted on 06/10/2011 7:53:38 AM PDT by mmichaels1970
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To: bananaman22
But the Fukushima debacle has finally bared the industry’s darkest secret, it inability to manage its nuclear waste.

After government takes every strategy for waste management off the table, it's the industry's fault that they can't manage their waste. Brilliant. /s

8 posted on 06/10/2011 8:12:59 AM PDT by Campion ("Fallacies do not cease to be fallacies when they become fashions." -- GKC)
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To: bananaman22; Defendingliberty; WL-law; Normandy; TenthAmendmentChampion; FrPR; enough_idiocy; ...
 


Beam me to Planet Gore !

9 posted on 06/10/2011 8:18:06 AM PDT by steelyourfaith (If it's "green" ... it's crap !!!)
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To: bananaman22

Solar’s a liberal fantasy... Japan couldn’t run a village on it...


10 posted on 06/10/2011 8:19:33 AM PDT by GOPJ (In times of universal deceit, telling the truth will be a revolutionary act. - - Orwell)
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To: bananaman22

Solar watts instead of nuclear megawatts. That’s a plan.


11 posted on 06/10/2011 8:20:35 AM PDT by Avery Iota Kracker (You say ma-ca-ca, I say mac-a-ca....)
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To: bananaman22

No they won’t. Solar won’t cut it.

If E-Cat (look up LENR, Rossi) turns out to be the real deal, they will turn to it for their power generation.

BTW, so will everyone else. It’s a game changer.


12 posted on 06/10/2011 8:32:55 AM PDT by TruthInThoughtWordAndDeed (Yahuah Yahusha)
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To: bananaman22

Mass solar power is a stupid idea. The Japanese are not a stupid people.


13 posted on 06/10/2011 8:33:40 AM PDT by BfloGuy (Even the opponents of Socialism are dominated by socialist ideas.)
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To: bananaman22
How many square miles of solar panels will it take to replace the power from one nuclear reactor?

Will the Greens scream as forest is cut down because shade doesn't power anything, and gets in the way of panels that do?

14 posted on 06/10/2011 8:34:34 AM PDT by chesley (Eat what you want, and die like a man.)
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To: bananaman22

How many square miles of solar panels will it take to replace the power from one nucleur reactor?

Will the Greens scream as forest is cut down because shade doesn’t power anything, and gets in the way of panels that do?


15 posted on 06/10/2011 8:35:26 AM PDT by chesley (Eat what you want, and die like a man.)
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To: bananaman22

Because the Japanese don’t need electricity at night?
Because they have sites to dump all the toxic waste from making solar panel, not to mention the toxic worn-out solar panels themselves?
Because they have lots and lots of empty space to use for solar farms?
Because they lots of excess cash to invest in inefficient power generation schemes?

Boy those Japanese are lucky!


16 posted on 06/10/2011 8:39:59 AM PDT by Little Ray (Best Conservative in the Primary; AGAINST Obama in the General.)
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To: bananaman22
Fukushima stored all its waste onsite...

Well, there's your problem right there. And every other nuke site in the world has the same problem. When are we finally going to do something to fix it?

17 posted on 06/10/2011 8:44:21 AM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open ( <o> ---)
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To: smokingfrog
Well, there's your problem right there. And every other nuke site in the world has the same problem. When are we finally going to do something to fix it?

We're not. We can write tomes about how stupid the reaction might be, but facts are facts, and nuclear is dead. Propaganda and unfounded fears killed it, but it's still dead.

18 posted on 06/10/2011 8:57:25 AM PDT by Melas (Sent via Galaxy Tab)
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To: dirtboy

“There is a place for solar - namely as a widely distributed resource on rooftops to supplement large-scale power sources. But not as a primary source of power.”

You are misinformed about rooftop solar. In most cases, it is a very inefficient way to generate electricity. Absent huge subsidies (federal and state tax credits, forced utility subsidy (utility earns interest on this investment), forced offsets of excess solar power generation, and other solar industry subsidies), rooftop solar has payback periods from 50 to 100 years. Without subsidies, rooftop solar would be limited to offgrid usage and rich, deluded leftists.


19 posted on 06/10/2011 9:02:06 AM PDT by businessprofessor
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To: businessprofessor

I see solar on rooftops mainly for solar heating/hot water until efficiencies improve.


20 posted on 06/10/2011 9:08:02 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

Mega dittos.

What the idiots who write to the papers who think that a future solar collector the size of a cellphone can light up a city don’t realize:
A square foot 100% efficient solar collector at the equator at noon generates only 100 watts. And a 100% efficient collector is impossible.


21 posted on 06/10/2011 9:09:14 AM PDT by hecht (TAKE BACK OUR NATION AND OUR NATIONAL ANTHEM)
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To: dirtboy

“going to Thorium reactors and actually building waste repositories”

Don’t the French reprocess used fuel rods to cut down on the waste?


22 posted on 06/10/2011 9:09:26 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: bananaman22

The Japanese will spend trillions on solar power only to find it will not replace their nuclear power program in any large part. Solar might work on a small scale but cannot supply the power needs of an industrial nation.


23 posted on 06/10/2011 9:17:01 AM PDT by The Great RJ ("The problem with socialism is that pretty soon you run out of other people's money" M. Thatcher)
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To: dirtboy

“I see solar on rooftops mainly for solar heating/hot water until efficiencies improve.”

I am not sure about solar for water heating. It may work if you use electricity for heating. I am not sure that rooftop solar makes sense for natural gas heating.


24 posted on 06/10/2011 9:22:50 AM PDT by businessprofessor
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To: Durus

“If anything demonstrated the overall safety of nuclear power, the accidents in Japan did.”

A truly pathetic statement, that takes away my faith in the human race. With reasoning like that then we can consider it impossible to fix anything in this country or the world.


25 posted on 06/10/2011 9:25:05 AM PDT by Revel
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To: bananaman22

Maybe the Japanese know something the rest of the world does’nt about solar energy. But I doubt it or they’d be marketing it.

I think some 80% of Japan’s electrical energy is generated by nukes. Not sure what that translates to in kws, but if they shut down their nukes it’ll be decades before the country ever has a chance of regaining its industrial footing.

Solar technology is just not viable as a replacement energy generation system And it will be decades before it gets there—if it ever does.

My money is on more practical heads prevailing as time elapses and emotions calm down. There has always been a vociferous Japanese anti-nuke crowd in the Land of the Rising Sun. Partly because of the a-bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Partly because of that island nation’s vigorous Marxist contingent.


26 posted on 06/10/2011 9:27:20 AM PDT by dools0007world
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To: bananaman22

As we watch the “lost decade” evolve into the lost century.


27 posted on 06/10/2011 9:35:46 AM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: Revel
Generally when one is confronted with an opinion they find distasteful they can come up with facts to counter said opinion. If you think acting like a drama queen changes anything except peoples opinion of you, I'm afraid you are mistaken.
28 posted on 06/10/2011 9:51:16 AM PDT by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: bananaman22

Isn’t real estate a very precious commodity in Japan? About the only open place to host a solar panel array will be in the Fukishima Exclusion Zone.


29 posted on 06/10/2011 9:53:08 AM PDT by NonValueAdded (They think "just because she's right on every damn issue doesn't give her enough credibility.")
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To: bananaman22

I think they should power their country with American coal.


30 posted on 06/10/2011 9:56:01 AM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: bananaman22

Solar power doth not steel make.


31 posted on 06/10/2011 10:10:09 AM PDT by GingisK
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

Not only are you correct ...but the basic article is incorrect - in that the Japanese send their spent fuel to France for reprocessing!

Obviously, spent fuel has decay heat - and it might sit in a spent fuel pool for cooling for 5 to 10 years - and then is shipped off for reprocessing, but NO - not all spent fuel remains on-site (unlike our American reactors - where the federal government promised to support - reprocessing (then stopped by the idiot peanut farmer) - planned off-site fuel storage - Yucca Mountain - stopped by the present idiot who makes the idiot peanut farmer look competant!)

Note - go back and read some of the discussions during the initial time frame after the tsunami - there were discussions of the impact of Mixed Oxide (MOX)Fuels contributing to the problem. MOX fuels use reprocessed spent fuel...plutonium from spent fuel, maybe some “fresh” enriched Uranium so that the new fuel can provide power over an 18 to 24 month operational period before the next refueling.


32 posted on 06/10/2011 11:15:12 AM PDT by Vineyard
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To: Vineyard

Thanks for the details. I believe I read that the French waste stockpile is much, much less than ours, because of this.


33 posted on 06/10/2011 11:23:17 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Durus

You offer no facts at all. You cannot possible offer facts to support your position. Because you only have propaganda on your side. I will offer some. But you will have to read-sort through and Analise to separate fact from noise. But their are plenty facts here:

http://www.timebomb2000.com/vb/showthread.php?380265-Fukushima-Three-Reactor-Cores-Have-Melted-Down-Containment-Is-Marginal-post-5466/page146

A lot of people are going to get sick and die in the future because of this. And it is far from over. And then there will be the birth defects, and the radioactive concrete that is about to be made. And some people in Seattle have a few “Hot” particles in their lungs. The governments lying about it and covering up the truth every step of the way.

And the the fuel “Melted Through” and into the ground.


34 posted on 06/10/2011 2:41:31 PM PDT by Revel
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To: Durus

Physician and Epidemiologist Say 35% Spike in Infant Mortality in Northwest Cities Since Meltdown Might Be the Result of Fallout from Fukushima

http://www.zerohedge.com/article/physician-and-epidemiologist-say-35-spike-infant-mortality-northwest-cities-meltdown-might-b


35 posted on 06/10/2011 2:49:07 PM PDT by Revel
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To: Revel
What propaganda do I have on my side? Based on the facts it appears problems with nuke plants happens in two ways. Gross incompetence (Chernobyl) or earthquakes the likes of which the continental united states never sees. Modern plants bear even less risk.

Don't get me wrong, if there is a cheaper or more efficient way of producing power fine, let's go that direction, but the sad fact of the matter is that there isn't, and even given the potential problems it's worth the risk.

Let's see what happens in 5 years from this problem in Japan. Like the oil spill in the gulf, the situation could be serious but isn't likely to be as severe as all the doomsayers want it to be.

36 posted on 06/10/2011 7:54:12 PM PDT by Durus (You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality. Ayn Rand)
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To: Revel; Durus
That is an opinion. The FACTS are these:

Before Fukushima it was not known what would it happen to a nuclear power station in the case of a huge natural disaster. Today we do know.

In fact, mother nature has performed a huge destructive testing. Furthermore, this "test" carried out on a single nuclear reactor might have yielded non-binding results. However ten reactors under different conditions suffered the earthquake and tsunami. That's a big sample.

Today we know much more about the behavior of a nuclear power plant suffering a major natural disaster and therefore they are much safer than on March 10th.
37 posted on 06/11/2011 12:18:05 AM PDT by J Aguilar (Fiat Justitia et ruat coelum)
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To: Revel
And the the fuel “Melted Through” and into the ground.

That is a free statement. Corium did not reach the ground in Chernobyl, which was a far more severe accident.
38 posted on 06/11/2011 12:59:23 AM PDT by J Aguilar (Fiat Justitia et ruat coelum)
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To: J Aguilar

You have your “Facts” I have mine. At least I read the news.

Physician and Epidemiologist Say 35% Spike in Infant Mortality in Northwest Cities Since Meltdown Might Be the Result of Fallout from Fukushima

http://www.counterpunch.org/sherman06102011.html


39 posted on 06/11/2011 5:57:09 PM PDT by Revel
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To: Revel

“say”? Science is about proving.


40 posted on 06/12/2011 1:44:10 AM PDT by J Aguilar (Fiat Justitia et ruat coelum)
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