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Kudzu-eating sheep take a bite out of weeds
Atlanta Journal Constitution ^ | June 10, 2011 | Alexis Stevens

Posted on 06/10/2011 7:44:35 PM PDT by Pan_Yan

It's everywhere in the South. The green, winding vines of kudzu line highways, climb trees and fill backyards. It can be downright aggravating if you want to get rid of it.

Except if you're a sheep or a goat.

"They'll eat just about everything," Brian Cash, of Decatur, told the AJC.

As the owner of Eweniversally Green, Cash makes a living helping customers fight off kudzu, ivy and other weeds. His employees? About 100 four-legged friends.

"Primarily sheep and a few well-behaved goats," Cash, 30, said.

Unwanted greenery gets chomped away quickly when Cash brings his animals by. The sheep stay busy, but they don't mind. Plus, the change of location every few days is nice.

"The animals are on really good, lush food," Cash said. "It's like going to a fancy restaurant every day."

Although using livestock to control plant growth is common in rural areas, Cash said he's the only one with a business like his in Atlanta. He grew up in Dunwoody, nowhere near the country, but he's been interested in livestock since he was a child.

Since he started the venture earlier this year, both he and the animals have been busy, going from site to site all over town. Customers are asked to provide water for the animals and to wash all the greenery down. And Cash brings along a temporary, solar-powered fence that goes up quickly to prevent the animals from escaping or getting injured.

(Excerpt) Read more at ajc.com ...


TOPICS: Gardening; Outdoors; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: georgia; kudzu; sheep

1 posted on 06/10/2011 7:44:38 PM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan

Don’t let cows or goats you plan to milk eat kudzu, gives the milk a peculiar flavor.

Plenty of other uses for the stuff though, it turns out. Several creative local farmers have found a way to convert a big stand of it into a cash crop. Harvest and bale, feed it to livestock. The vines are saleable to craft shops for certain wreaths and flower arrangements. The young leaves are edible and fairly tasty fried up in a light batter. Jellies made with the purple blooms tastes nice enough, the color seems to intensify as it’s cooked, which is unusual. And finally, the roots are not just edible but regarded as medicinal in Asia. Good hangover cure, helpful to stave off alcohol cravings in those who have a problem with it.

The vine that ate the south might turn into a blessing instead of a curse after all, lol. Now, if I could just figure out how to make biofuel out of it.


2 posted on 06/10/2011 7:52:29 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Pan_Yan

The free enterprise system at work. I like stories like these.


3 posted on 06/10/2011 7:59:32 PM PDT by OldNewYork
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To: RegulatorCountry
Now, if I could just figure out how to make biofuel out of it.

That might be worth looking into. The neighbors are gonna start talk when I'm out back torching weeds in various manners.

4 posted on 06/10/2011 8:00:32 PM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan

Pressing it doesn’t produce much except a pulpy mess. Not a source for vegetable oil (yes I tried it, lol).


5 posted on 06/10/2011 8:04:58 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: Pan_Yan

Shhh, the democRATS/Peta/EPA will find a way to close it down or tax it heavy.


6 posted on 06/10/2011 8:10:19 PM PDT by TribalPrincess2U (VOTE out the RATS! Go Sarah!)
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To: RegulatorCountry

Thanks for the warning. No pressing. Check.


7 posted on 06/10/2011 8:10:40 PM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan
On next week's Kudzu Wars, Admiral of the Ocean Sea Paul Watson annoys some of the kudzu eating sheep and goats by trying to trip them with ropes thrown under them until one of the goats gets sick of it and butts him down. Watson runs off with a bruised rear and bloody nose, vowing revenge.
8 posted on 06/10/2011 8:19:54 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vice! Tea Party extremism is a badge of honor.)
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To: Pan_Yan

OM NOM NOM NOM

9 posted on 06/10/2011 8:20:00 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: Pan_Yan

OM NOM NOM NOM

10 posted on 06/10/2011 8:20:24 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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pfft, server fart.


11 posted on 06/10/2011 8:21:05 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: Pan_Yan
Brian Cash leads the herd to a new grazing area in front of the home of Kathie and Kevin Brown in Dunwoody

Sheep belonging to Brian Cash, the owner of Eweniversally Green, were hard at work at the home of Kathie and Kevin Brown in Dunwoody on Friday, June 10, 2011.

12 posted on 06/10/2011 8:23:56 PM PDT by rawhide
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To: Pan_Yan

Neat story OP! Thank you!


13 posted on 06/10/2011 8:24:37 PM PDT by rawhide
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To: Pan_Yan
Kudzu-eating sheep take a bite out of weeds

Ain't enough goats/sheep in the world to get rid of the southern scourge known as Kudzu.

14 posted on 06/10/2011 8:26:04 PM PDT by doc1019 (Palin/West, unbeatable.)
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To: Pan_Yan

Neat story OP! Thank you!


15 posted on 06/10/2011 8:28:57 PM PDT by rawhide
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To: Pan_Yan

Neat story OP! Thank you!


16 posted on 06/10/2011 8:29:03 PM PDT by rawhide
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To: rawhide

Lots of double posting tonight. I think FR is running slow.


17 posted on 06/10/2011 8:41:54 PM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: Pan_Yan

The sheep don’t just eat the kudzu; they actually convert it into a nice fertilizer which they graciously deposit around the yard.


18 posted on 06/10/2011 8:46:18 PM PDT by bobjam
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To: Pan_Yan

I once had a plan that was so un-PC and so efficient that it would have blown liberal fuses all over the planet.

Briefly, take young herd boys from any of the East African pastoral tribes, Pokot, Turkana, Karamajong, Maasai. Only a single tribe a a time, though. Bring them & their young goats & lambs to the SE USA.

Rent the boys & their goats to clear Kudzu covered land. Half of the boys watch goats in the morning, the other half go to school. At noon, swap places. After just under a year, load the boys, their fat goats and sheep onboard a ship heading to Africa.

Stop by Jeddah on the way back to Mombasa in time the sell the livestock to the pilgrims doing their haj. Drop the boys back at Mombasa with tickets home, half the cash from renting & selling the livestock, and a good start to an education.

Use the other half of the income for the expenses of the entire operation.

Now that’s a symbiotic relationship! Otherwise known as “Win, Win, Win”.

Just another wild & crazy idea from BwanaNdege!

;-)


19 posted on 06/10/2011 8:54:18 PM PDT by BwanaNdege (For those who have fought for it, Life bears a savor the protected will never know.)
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To: bobjam

Full of Kudzu seeds.


20 posted on 06/10/2011 9:10:28 PM PDT by doc1019 (Palin/West, unbeatable.)
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To: doc1019

But there are evidently enough of them to make Mr. Cash a lot of cash . . .


21 posted on 06/10/2011 9:13:04 PM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Vigilanteman

The entrepreneurial spirit at work.


22 posted on 06/10/2011 9:18:43 PM PDT by doc1019 (Palin/West, unbeatable.)
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To: Pan_Yan; All

HOW TO GROW KUDZU
by Tifton B. Merritt

All you beginning gardeners out there might want to consider growing kudzu as a fine way to launch out into the great adventure of gardening. Kudzu, for those of you not already familiar
with it, is a hardy perennial that can be grown quite well by the beginner who observes these few simple rules.

CHOOSING A PLOT: Kudzu can be grown almost anywhere, so site selection is not the problem it is with some other finicky plants like strawberries. Although kudzu will grow quite well on cement, for best results you should select an area having at least some dirt. To avoid lawsuits, it is advisable to plant well away from your neighbor’s house, unless, of course, you don’t get along well with your neighbor anyway.

PREPARING THE SOIL: Go out and stomp on the soil for a while just to get its attention and to prepare it for kudzu.

DECIDING WHEN TO PLANT: Kudzu should always be planted at night. If kudzu is planted during daylight hours, angry neighbors might see you and begin throwing rocks at you.

SELECTING THE PROPER FERTILIZER: The best fertilizer I have discovered for kudzu is 40 weight non-detergent motor oil. Kudzu actually doesn’t need anything to help it grow, but the
motor oil helps to prevent scraping the underside of the tender leaves then the kudzu starts its rapid growth. It also cuts down on friction and lessens the danger of fire when the kudzu really
starts to move. Change oil once every thousand feet or every two weeks, whichever comes first.

MULCHING THE PLANTS: Contrary to what you may be told by the Extension Service, kudzu can profit from a good mulch. I have found that a heavy mulch for the young plants produces a hardier crop. For best results, as soon as the young shoots begin to appear, cover kudzu with concrete blocks. Although this causes a temporary setback, your kudzu will accept this mulch as a challenge and will reward you with redoubled determination in the long run.

ORGANIC OR CHEMICAL GARDENING: Kudzu is ideal for either the organic gardener or for those who prefer to use chemicals to ward off garden pests. Kudzu is oblivious to both chemicals and pests. Therefore, you can grow organically and let the pests get out of the way of the kudzu as best they can, or you can spray any commercial poison directly onto your crop.

Your decision depends on how much you personally enjoy killing bugs. The kudzu will not be affected either way.

CROP ROTATION: Many gardeners are understandably concerned that growing the same crop year after year will deplete the soil. If you desire to change from kudzu to some other plant next year, now is the time to begin preparations.

Right now, before the growing season has reached its peak, you should list your house and lot with a reputable real estate agent and begin making plans to move elsewhere. Your chances of selling will be better now then they will be later in the year, when it may be difficult for prospective buyer to realize that beneath those lush, green vines stands an adorable three-bedroom house.

http://www.walterreeves.com/how-to-archive/how-to-grow-kudzu/


23 posted on 06/10/2011 9:38:16 PM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: Kartographer

just throw the seeds on the ground and run like hell


24 posted on 06/10/2011 10:28:22 PM PDT by Charlespg
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To: Kartographer

just throw the seeds on the ground and run like hell


25 posted on 06/10/2011 10:28:24 PM PDT by Charlespg
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To: RegulatorCountry
Now, if I could just figure out how to make biofuel out of it.

Sheep & goat poop...Dry it...burn it!


Excellent comments about the uses of kudzu.

26 posted on 06/10/2011 10:38:48 PM PDT by Tainan (Cogito Ergo Conservitus.)
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To: doc1019

A goat will eat the leaves but the stems will remain. So they ain’t killin’ it.


27 posted on 06/10/2011 10:58:34 PM PDT by Terry Mross
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To: bobjam

I use to raise angora goats and the fertilizer is the best. No odor, little pellets like rabbits and deer. My zinna’s would get to 5 foot tall and then flower...best garden I ever had. You only clean the barn floor once a year. Had quite a few, started with a small flock of 18 and 5 years later up to 75-80 goats....There are a few things goats won’t eat, one is wild mustard, I tasted one of the leaves and its bitter as the dickens...


28 posted on 06/11/2011 2:56:21 AM PDT by goat granny
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To: Charlespg

LOL


29 posted on 06/11/2011 3:00:08 AM PDT by goat granny
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To: RegulatorCountry

One of the funniest uses for it I have seen was as a Halloween costume....the guy came as a bush...he tied long strands of it together in the middle put it on his head and had someone trim it around his feet. He walked around all night looking like a green cousin It.


30 posted on 06/11/2011 3:12:38 AM PDT by Lady Heron
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To: Tainan

Just close your windows at night to keep the kudzu out, lol.

Here’s a pretty thorough article on the topic:

http://www.maxshores.com/kudzu/


31 posted on 06/11/2011 4:14:09 AM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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