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Pledge Is One of Many Oaths Iíve Been Proud to Take (Pledge of Allegiance)
Register Guard ^ | June 22, 2011 | Pat Parr

Posted on 06/22/2011 12:23:33 PM PDT by Retain Mike

On Sept. 7, 1965, I stepped into an American classroom for the first time.

I was nervous, but in that the Beatles had been on the Ed Sullivan Show just before that and I had a similar English accent (Sheffield, not Liverpool), I was quite a novelty and the nerves soon went away.

Then, without warning, I was asked, along with all of the other kids in Mrs. Imhoff’s sixth-grade class at East Elementary in Tillamook, to recite the Pledge of Allegiance.

I didn’t know the words, but Debbie Johnson, standing next to me, did.

And she was proud to help me out.

The next day I could recite it without help, and I can to this day. And I, like Debbie Johnson, am proud to do so, every chance I get.

Later, on Oct. 25, 1979, after taking an extended course of study and passing a knowledge test, I became a citizen of the United States. I freely recited the following:

“I hereby declare, on oath,

“that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen;

“that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic;

“that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same;

“that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by law;

“that I will perform noncombatant service in the armed forces of the United States when required by the law;

“that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law;

“and that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God. In acknowledgement whereof I have hereunto affixed my signature.”

A few years later, I joined the U.S. Army and the Oregon Army National Guard:

“I, Patrick Matthew Farr, do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the president of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God.” (Title 10, US Code; Act of May 5, 1960, replacing the wording first adopted in 1789, with amendment effective Oct. 5, 1962).

Then I became a commissioned officer:

“I, Patrick Matthew Farr ... having been appointed an officer in the Army of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of second lieutenant, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; so help me God.” (Department of the Army Form 71, Aug. 1, 1959, for officers.)

In January 2003 I was sworn in as state representative for Oregon House District 14:

“I, Patrick Matthew Farr Sr., do solemnly swear, or affirm, that I will support the Constitution of the United States, and the Constitution of the state of Oregon, and that I will faithfully discharge the duties of Oregon state representative according to the best of my ability.”

Every day thereafter, when I reported to the floor of the House, before any other duty was performed, I — along with the entire House and gallery — pledged allegiance to the flag of the United States of America.

Will I ask the Eugene City Council and gallery to voluntarily join me before council meetings in pledging allegiance to the flag of the United States of America, and to the republic for which it stands?

You bet I will.

Pat Farr, a naturalized citizen, has served in the Oregon Legislature, on the Bethel School Board and in the U.S. Army and Oregon National Guard. He is a current and past member of the Eugene City Council.


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans; Religion; Society
KEYWORDS: oath; pledge; pledgeofallegiance
This article will be interesting to review today and tomorrow as the comments pile up. In the Eugene there is a “highly controversial” proposal by this councilor to begin City of Eugene council meetings with the Pledge of Allegiance. The proposal is by the individual who wrote this Guest Point of View.
1 posted on 06/22/2011 12:23:36 PM PDT by Retain Mike
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To: Retain Mike

Touching example that puts things in perspective.


2 posted on 06/22/2011 12:38:59 PM PDT by nolongerademocrat ("Before you ask G-d for something, first thank G-d for what you already have." B'rachot 30b)
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To: Retain Mike
I never liked the pledge much. It was written by a Socialist. I wish instead that kids would sing the Star Spangled Banner in all four stanzas as I did.

I guess with the Messiah's administration, I should really be singing "The Internationale." The version printed in wikipedia does not move as smoothly as the version I have sung. I am cynical enough to think "The Internationale" is our new national anthem with that Bolshevik, Milli Vanilli character (TOTUS) in the White House.

3 posted on 06/22/2011 12:55:43 PM PDT by Stepan12 (Palin & Bolton in 2012)
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To: Retain Mike

Touching example that puts things in perspective.


4 posted on 06/22/2011 1:09:55 PM PDT by nolongerademocrat ("Before you ask G-d for something, first thank G-d for what you already have." B'rachot 30b)
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To: Stepan12

The Pledge written by Bellemy was amended in 1923 and again in 1924 by a national Committee. When they changed Bellamy’s “my flag” to “the flag of the United States”and the next year added “of America” it ceased to be Bellamy’s Pledge. When Congress got around to recognizing the Pledge ,in 1942 they
ended Bellamy’s Socialist salute. When Congress acted- and President Eisenhower agreed to add by law “under God” they made the pledge a reflection of our nations coin which has been minted since 1865— and reflects (since Under God was added the Star Spangled Banner(written in 1814 and recognized by Congress as the National Anthem in 1931.The same year Congress approved adding “under God” they approved the Congressional Prayer room with image of Gen.George Washington kneeling as if in prayer-and the banner reads the words from Psalm16:1.With other Christian symbols. The man from Oregon sounds like a man welcome in my house and I salute him for his service to our Country and in defense of our Constitution.


5 posted on 06/22/2011 3:15:38 PM PDT by StonyBurk (ring)
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To: StonyBurk
The man from Oregon sounds like a man welcome in my house and I salute him for his service to our Country and in defense of our Constitution.

Yeah... I agree with you about that fellow and your comments on the pledge are most interesting; however, I still wish people would sing the Star Spangled Banner -- the complete version. I will continue to sing all four stanzas if the need for singing our national anthem arises.

6 posted on 06/22/2011 5:50:21 PM PDT by Stepan12 (Palin & Bolton in 2012)
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To: Stepan12

The very idea that the Star Spangled Banner had four verses would be terrifying to most people in Eugene. To them Francis Scott Key could never have written, “Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation. Then conquer we must, for our cause is just, and this be our motto: “In God is our trust’.” The Pledge of Allegiance is daunting enough for them.


7 posted on 06/22/2011 9:59:58 PM PDT by Retain Mike
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To: Retain Mike
The very idea that the Star Spangled Banner had four verses would be terrifying to most people in Eugene. To them Francis Scott Key could never have written, “Praise the Power that hath made and preserved us a nation. Then conquer we must, for our cause is just, and this be our motto: “In God is our trust’.” The Pledge of Allegiance is daunting enough for them.

That fourth verse in God is our trust is probably the best one of our anthem. There was a fellow at a tea party rally who did sing all four... stanzas(?).

When I was real little I didn't know "The Star Spangled Banner" was our national anthem; however, I heard "The Star Spangled Banner" and "America the Beautiful" sung and I always liked "The Star Spangled Banner" better, even if "America the Beautiful" is easier to sing.

8 posted on 06/23/2011 2:13:16 AM PDT by Stepan12 (Palin & Bolton in 2012)
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To: Stepan12
I like a simple salute.
9 posted on 06/23/2011 2:23:20 AM PDT by Daffynition ("Don't just live your life, but witness it also.")
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To: Stepan12

We are in agreement. I would join in singing all of the National anthem anytime.When we start cutting out parts to make it more convenient we end up risking being cut as no longer needed ourselves.


10 posted on 06/23/2011 2:50:07 PM PDT by StonyBurk (ring)
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