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Weekly Gardening Thread 2011 (Vol. 24) June 24
Free Republic | 06-24-2011 | Red_Devil 232

Posted on 06/24/2011 5:15:19 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232

Good morning gardeners. Well this past week brought a respite from the sunny hot weather here in Mississippi. We received two days of beneficial rains, which helped to revive my garden. Watching the radar it looked like a good portion of south-central Texas from San Antonio to the northeast corner received some rain also. I hope it was helpful to our gardeners over that way. My winter squash are growing like mad and my hot and sweet peppers are doing great. What is left of my tomatoes seem to have revived a bit during these rainy and cloudy days. I really hope that what ever weather you have had improved a bit for you and your gardens this past week.

If you are a gardener or you are just starting out and are in need of advice or just encouragement please feel free to join in and enjoy the friendly discussion. Our Freeper community is full of gardeners, each with varying interests and skill levels from Master Gardener to novice.


TOPICS: Agriculture; Food; Gardening; Hobbies
KEYWORDS: garden; gardening; recipes; weekly
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Weekly Gardening Thread

gardeningtools_Full-1.jpg picture by wjb123




FREE SEED EXCHANGE

 

This EXCHANGE is brought to you by FReeper 

Mrs. Don-o

Thrifty? Gifty? Curious? Generous? Spare seeds? Rare seeds? For a tiny plot? Or a flower- pot? Send seeds? Befriend seeds? Just want 10 seeds?

Send seeds? Befriend seeds? Just want 10 seeds?

 

If you have garden seeds you can offer other FReepers for free, for a SASE, and/or in exchange for other seeds, please send me your info. (Private Message Mrs. Don-o) and I will add you to this list, which I will post on the garden thread from time to time. Please also Private Message me to be removed when you no longer have the seeds to offer. FReepo-seedoholics can contact each other by Private Message to arrange any transactions.

Remember that old seeds may have reduced germination. (Although I’ve had great luck with them. And for free, you can’t lose...) If possible, list year and variety.

Mrs. Don-o

I CAN OFFER a few of these seeds (say, 10) for free to anybody who wants to send me a SASE:

Basil (“Genovese” 2010)

Beans (“Jackson Wonder Butterbean “2011)

Broccoli (“Bonanza” 2011) Chard (“Bright Lights” 2010)

Fennel (“Florence” 2011)

Kale (“Redbor Hybrid” 2010)

Squash (“Acorn 2009”… and I had really good germination with it, this year!)

Squash “(Georgia Candy Roaster” 2011.. a terrific winter squash!)

Tomato (“Brandy Boy” 2011)

INTERESTED IN

Seeds for Fall

Anything (surprise me!)


I HAVE HEIRLOOM TOMATO SEEDS (FREEPER TDSCPA) from about 75 popular, open-pollinated heirloom varieties. Tell me via PM what varieties you’re interested in, and if I have them I could send you a few seeds (10?) if you will send me a SASE.

Don’t know what variety to grow? I can make suggestions, if you want to grow plants from seed. Contact Tdscpa


If anyone needs or wants okra seeds (says JustaDumbBlonde)… please let me know. I saved a ridiculous amount in the fall of 2010. Two different varieties, Clemson and Jade, are both are heirloom variety so that you will be able to save seeds from your plants. Both are spineless and heavy producers. Jade is a bit darker green than Clemson and the pods are a bit shorter and fatter. Both are good for frying, soups, freezing, dehydrating or canning. Don’t be shy, l have more than plenty to share! Tip for planting okra: soak your seeds for 24 hours before planting. Okra seeds are hard like peppercorns and soaking will assist in quicker germination. Contact JustaDumbBlonde


I have some black-seeded Simpson lettuce seeds and some Buttercrunch lettuce seeds if anyone’s interested. (says Oberon), And... anybody have any Gold Nugget yellow cherry tomato seeds? I’m interested. Contact Oberon


Free Winter Squash or Stevia seeds or Heirloom Tomato/Pepper Seeds (says Black Agnes) The ‘Patio Marconi’ seeds are container peppers that are sweet and good for salads, sandwiches or frying. Open pollinated if that interests you. Cilantro seeds too. It’s good used fresh to detox heavy metals. Contact Black Agnes


 

swheats Has the following packets of seeds to share. They were a gift and never used contact swheats if you would like any of these packets.

Ferry Morse seeds Dated 2010

Arugula
Organic Watermelon(Moon&Stars,100%certified organic seed)
Swiss Chard (rainbow of colors)
Broccoli
Cauliflower
Turnip
Tomato (brandywine heirloom variety)
Gourd (swan)
Carrot (nutri-red)
Carrot (Big Ideas Veggie Tales)

Burpee Seeds Dated 2009

Coriander
Cilantro (Chinese parsley)
Tomato (Delicious)
Organic Cucumber Sumter (100% certified Organic Seed)
Parsley (single Italian Plain Leafed
Spearmint
Basil (Summer Long)
Sweet Corn (Jubilee Hybrid)
Green Bean (gourmet mix)
Cucumber (bush Champion)
Lettuce (Loose leaf mixture)
Squash (Fordhook Zuchini)
Pea (Sugar Daddy)

1 posted on 06/24/2011 5:15:24 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232
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To: Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; billhilly; Alkhin; ...
Ping to the Weekly Gardening Ping List.

I hope all of you will stop by.

This is typically a low volume ping list. Once a week for the thread and every once in a while for other FR threads posted that might be of interest.

If you would like to be added to or removed from the list please let me know by FreepMail or by posting to me.

2 posted on 06/24/2011 5:16:34 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

I live in Panama City, FL. It’s been miserably hot and dry here. I don’t think we’ve had an inch of rain at my house since March. My peas and string beans died after producing a pretty meager harvest. The cucumbers died last week. A couple of tomatoes died and the survivors are barely holding on. It’s been a pretty rough year for gardening.


3 posted on 06/24/2011 5:36:59 AM PDT by mbynack (Retired USAF SMSgt)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Mornin’, Red.


4 posted on 06/24/2011 5:37:54 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies. Plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Good morning. I read where you got some rain also. Did it help?


5 posted on 06/24/2011 5:40:57 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232; Diana in Wisconsin; fanfan; tubebender; greeneyes; JustaDumbBlonde; ...

Good morning all. It’s been raing al week. When I was checking my garden yesterday between shouwers, I noticed something “funnY’ about my tomatoes. Keep in mind that these plants have been in the ground only about 2 1/2 weeks. In that time, they have more than doubled in size, set a few tomatoes, etc. ut, I noticed yesterday that one out of the 16 plants looks funny” on top. The topmost leaves are bending back upon themselves so that the leaf looks more like a poinsietta leaf than a tomato leaf. They are sort of pity around the edges.

All the rest of the plants look fine. It’s an “Early Girl”. I’ll post pictures later on. I took some photos last night, but I want to take some more. I need to get at another computer to post them.

My question: Should I just pull out this plant before it contaminates the others? Should I spray it with something?


6 posted on 06/24/2011 5:41:53 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: mbynack

Sorry to hear that. Yeah it has been very sunny and hot hear also. I lost some of my tomato plants to the heat!


7 posted on 06/24/2011 5:42:58 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Good morning! We finally got some rain, but could sure use more. However, I’m not complaining, others are in far worse shape than we are.


8 posted on 06/24/2011 5:45:17 AM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: Red_Devil 232
Greetings from soggy southern New Hampshire! It is still raining and the place is very lush! I love green!

Our two raised beds are doing swell. We have zucchini and tomatoes forming and the mellon vines are looking good. Our pepper plants are also looking promising.

Last weekend, our eleven pullets moved into their new coop and run. They seem okay, but Barb has to pick them up and place them in their coop every evening. They huddle together in the corner closest to where their cage used to be.

Yesterday, my son cleared the area around our back door and its suicide steps. When I got home, I took the string trimmer and cleared the weedes. Tomorrow morning, I start the deck. It is going to be a temporary affair, 14' by 14' and will eventually be taken down and moved to serve as the deck off of the future sun room. But, it will give us a nice place until the sun room is built.

Today is supposed to be the last day of rain. As my late Grandmother Schulz used to say, "We'll see!"

9 posted on 06/24/2011 5:47:20 AM PDT by Redleg Duke ("Madison, Wisconsin is 30 square miles surrounded by reality.", L. S. Dryfus)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Good morning RD. Not much to say about the garden, but we did get over 2.5” of much needed rain in central Texas. We are in a severe drought, and the weather people say it will take seven or more rain events like we had the other day to break out of this dry spell.


10 posted on 06/24/2011 5:48:23 AM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (zero hates Texas and we hate him back. He ain't my president either.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

I think your tomato plant is telling you that it has had to much water. The leaves will turn/curl under trying to expose as much of the leaf to the air in an attempt to expel water vapor.


11 posted on 06/24/2011 5:48:30 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Red_Devil 232
Things are going fairly well in my garden this year although I lost a rose and most of my Casa Blanca lilies. Tomatoes and peppers coming along nicely and my numerous hostas are just about ready to bloom. Daylilies in the front yard have passed their initial flush - should pick up again in about a week. My son is assisting me this year and doing a good job. Happy Gardening!

Lamh Foistenach Abu!
12 posted on 06/24/2011 5:48:50 AM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines RVN 1969 - St. Michael the Archangel defend us in Battle!)
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To: afraidfortherepublic; Red_Devil 232; tubebender; Diana in Wisconsin; rightly_dividing; greeneyes; ..

With typos corrected!

Good morning all. It’s been raining all week. When I was checking my garden yesterday between showers, I noticed something “funny” about my tomatoes. Keep in mind that these plants have been in the ground only about 2 1/2 weeks. In that time, they have more than doubled in size, set a few tomatoes, etc., but, I noticed yesterday that one out of the 16 plants looks “funny” on top. The topmost leaves are bending back upon themselves along the edges so that the leaf looks more like a poinsietta leaf than a tomato leaf. They are sort of pointy around the edges.

All the rest of the plants look fine. It’s an “Early Girl”. I’ll post pictures later on. I took some photos last night, but I want to take some more. I need to get at another computer to post them.

My question: Should I just pull out this plant before it contaminates the others? Should I spray it with something? All suggestions would be appreciated.


13 posted on 06/24/2011 5:51:14 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: mbynack
It's been dry here in MD - one of those summers when we hear thunder and see lightning and the storms go to the North or South of us. But we have had some nice rain this past week and I don't have to water as much.

My strawberries are gone, but now I have lots of red raspberries. I planted my lettuce pretty thick in my raised beds, so it seems to keep it cooler, so I am still getting some lovely lettuce. Have lots of green tomatoes, my cabbage and broccoli are not doing that great (got too hot too soon) and my squash is forming and the corn is doing well.

Here's to enough and but not too much rain to you all.

Have a great day - I'm off to do much needed weeding.

14 posted on 06/24/2011 5:53:04 AM PDT by gramho12
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To: Red_Devil 232; All

I am looking for some advice. We just moved to a new place this summer, and I am excited about extra space we have now for a garden ... just one problem. When we tilled, the amount of rock we have is astounding. Clay and rock is typical for our area, but where are, or where we tilled anyway, it is much more rock than clay. We picked up lots of rocks, but didn’t even make a dent, and ended up bringing in a load of top soil for a small section of the garden, as it’s late in the season and just wanted to get something in.

I thought about trying lasagna style gardening on the rest to start building up some organic material, but imagine it would take years to build up the amount I need? Raised beds are an option, as I had those at our last home, but that would get expensive over such a large area, unless there’s a cheaper method of which I am not aware?

Anyone else dealt with lots of rocks and have some ideas for me? I would appreciate any advice you could give. Thanks.


15 posted on 06/24/2011 5:53:04 AM PDT by chickpundit
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To: Red_Devil 232

‘Misty’ describes the weather here this week. Lettuce loves it. Everything and everyone else is wondering when the sun is coming back.

Barney Kessel (jazz guitarist) playing a nice version of the jazz standard:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mjI0XyrgtCU


16 posted on 06/24/2011 5:55:55 AM PDT by Betis70 (Bruins!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Well, my tomato plant should tell God that it has had too much water. I did disconnect the automatic sprinkler. We sure don’t need that in the rain! LOL.


17 posted on 06/24/2011 5:56:24 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: afraidfortherepublic

My tomatoes are also doing quite nicely. they have been getting watered quite well and as with yours, one has already some fruits on it.

Unsure on your malady, but red’s explanation sounds quite reasonable...


18 posted on 06/24/2011 5:57:03 AM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: Red_Devil 232; tubebender
I've got some big squash vines growing up a trellis --- North Gergia Candy Roaster is the variety. The upper leaves (up on the trellis) look great, it's growing vigorously, and it's setting fruit. But the bottom leaves, the ones closest the ground, are all turning yellow, then brown, then falling off. What's happening, do you think?

They're in big 20 gal. containers with plenty of drainage holes, but it's been phenomenally rainy for the past 7-10 days. Do you suppose they could be getting root-rot from too much water? Or could it be I've over-fertilized it? (Before it got so rainy, I was feeding it a high-nitrogen liquid fertilizer: diluted properly, but pretty regularly. Maybe too much?)

No visible sign of fungus or mold, by the way. And the upper plant looks swell. Just yellowing and dying of lower leaves.

BTW, this isn't happening to other cucurbit-types that I planted in the ground (not in containers.) Tubebender, I'm pinging you to this because I consider you a Wise One. Any ideas?

19 posted on 06/24/2011 5:57:42 AM PDT by Mrs. Don-o ("How do you know I'm mad?" said Alice. "You must be" said the Cat,"or you wouldn't have come here.")
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To: chickpundit

two possible courses of action come to mind right away: keep picking rocks and globalbuckets.org


20 posted on 06/24/2011 5:58:36 AM PDT by stefanbatory (Insert witty tagline here)
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To: chickpundit

Raised beds are worth it. Perhaps use this summer to build the beds for next growing season, and do some container gardening this summer.

I live in New England. We know rocks. Not sure where you are located, but we have so many rocks we stack them up into walls. Stick a shovel in the ground and you will hit a rock around here. I went with raised beds because I used to dig holes for a living here (archaeologist) and we would go through 3-4 shovels a year per person. Not because of handles breaking, but because we wore out the blades on all the rocks.


21 posted on 06/24/2011 6:08:41 AM PDT by Betis70 (Bruins!)
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To: Red_Devil 232

We finally had two days of warm, DRY weather. Nice enough to get into the garden and pull weeds and plant tomatoes (finally), peas, beans, annuals and other things that have been languishing in pots for weeks.

I just wanted to share a novel, to me, garden thought. I recently gave a talk on “Junk in the Garden”. Recycling or repurposing, really. I’ve found colorful advertising tins at the dump and planted them with complementary flowers. They are thriving and making an unusual, attractive display in the flower garden. Just thought I’d share.


22 posted on 06/24/2011 6:12:53 AM PDT by IM2MAD
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To: Red_Devil 232

We got about 20 minutes of rain a couple nights ago. First in who knows how long. It also brought the temperature out of the 100s - hey, 99 isn’t three digits.

The tomatoes have had it. Don’t know if it was just too much heat or if hubby spraying them with Miracle Grow did them in but they turned yellow the very next day.

Still no zukes. Huge healthy plants but not zukes.


23 posted on 06/24/2011 6:13:36 AM PDT by bgill
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To: Red_Devil 232
Rain, rain, and more rain. We are soaked. In between showers I've been spraying with neem oil to try to prevent any little nasties from growing due to excess moisture. We'll see if that works. I never got my potatoes in like I wanted, I was going to do containers this year, so I'm still going to make an attempt in a couple of weeks when I can get some to sprout some eyes for me. Better late than never!
24 posted on 06/24/2011 6:16:38 AM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Thank you for the information about the trellises. We’re extending the garden in the pasture and will be using cattle panels and rebar stakes. ala justadumbblonde.

Suddenly my walmart tomatoe plants are putting out tomatoes like gangbusters. All they needed was 1 inch of rain. Hopefully we’ll get more rain, we sure need it. My heirlooms are still fruitless, but have lots of flowers. My cherry tomatoes have some fruit and are now putting out more flowers, after the rain.


25 posted on 06/24/2011 6:24:25 AM PDT by tillacum (The whining, gasfumed, presstitutes are following Sarah's bus.)
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To: stefanbatory

Good morning Stef. It looks like it is going to nice today. I’ve got WE Energy people wandering all over my back yard today. They have to install a new electric line to my house because we lost half the feed the other day. i.e. (according to my resident engineer) all electricity comes into the house as 220v. Then it splits and 110v serves all the regular plugs. 220v (both legs) serves the stove, dryer, etc. And there is a neutral leg. We had 75v on one leg and 0 on the other.

We had been having problems with our TV sets — dropping stations, turning off in the middle of a program, etc. All of a sudden my stove did not work. Then the microwave dropped out, etc., etc. etc.

I have a house full of guests. No water (pump on the well out) no HOT water, no stove, no microwave. Despite 120,000 customers out from an overnight storm (did you see that Tues night) WE Energies considered us an “emergency” and came out and srung a temporary feed — big orange cables to my house. They are putting it underground today.

I complain about their prices (which they assure me are the cheapest in the country) but they are excellent on service.


26 posted on 06/24/2011 6:52:16 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Red_Devil 232

We got a much needed 1.0” this past Tuesday......

However, the temps are fast approaching 100 degrees again -— the garden is burning up.

Just trying to keep the okra & peppers alive.


27 posted on 06/24/2011 6:59:41 AM PDT by texanyankee
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To: Red_Devil 232
Outfitting my tomatoes and peppers with scuba tanks this morning; as the 'Stephen King' weather rolls on here at 'Ice Station Zebra'...temps in the low 50's with a persistent mist and 20 MPH winds off the Atlantic.

I have two words for this weather, and they aren't 'Merry Christmas'.

28 posted on 06/24/2011 7:14:52 AM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: chickpundit
Raised beds are an option, as I had those at our last home, but that would get expensive over such a large area, unless there’s a cheaper method of which I am not aware?

That's your answer...New England is all rock; so everything I grow is either in a raised bed or self-watering containers; such as Earth Boxes or home-made 'global buckets'. You can purchase nice garden mixes by the cubic yard at your local landscape center...just make sure you get the 'good stuff' instead of 'road sweepings'...

29 posted on 06/24/2011 7:21:43 AM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: Red_Devil 232

At this time last year, it was so much fun working in the garden. Watching all the veggies grow & the harvesting.

With the drought & heat this summer, it’s a major disappointment. We had a short window of harvesting, but for the most part, it’s over.

Even with watering the temps are preventing any fruit production and the plants are literally burning up.

We had no spring.

Oh well, all we can do is hope for a fall/winter garden.


30 posted on 06/24/2011 7:25:16 AM PDT by texanyankee
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To: Red_Devil 232

Beautiful weather in Central Missouri this past week. The garden has really jumped and is starting to look halfway decent. Tomato plants are waist high and blooming nicely, summer squash is starting to make, cucumbers are blooming, garlic and potatoes have been harvested, okra planted where those came out. Pulled a mess of chiogga beets and boiled them up for supper a couple nights ago. Yummy...

The chickens and ducks have cleaned up the cicadas and have started eating their pellet feed again. It was quite a hatch this year - they went three weeks on one filling of the self-feeder in the hen house. Normally I have to fill it every four or five days.


31 posted on 06/24/2011 7:29:12 AM PDT by Augie
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To: Red_Devil 232; All
Good Morning All. Progress is being made in the Bender Gardens and things are finally growing with the longer warmer days(if you can call 68 warmer?). The six rows of corn have eleven days until the 4th of July and they will exceed the axiom of Knew High by the Fourth of July. These pics were taken Wednesday and I have since added the drip irrigation lines and watered them...

This is the first potato planting of 3 rows of Red Gold and 1 row of Yukon Gold

This is the later planting of 2 rows of Yukon Gold and 2 of Red Lasoda with Shallots in the background...

My wife picked the first gallon of Heritage Raspberries yesterday and it is tedious work...

Then she picked the second gallon of Cascade strawberries


32 posted on 06/24/2011 7:38:21 AM PDT by tubebender (The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some very good ideas)
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To: Red_Devil 232

I’ve never heard of chinese parsley. Is it a flat leaf, a strong flavor?


33 posted on 06/24/2011 8:07:13 AM PDT by tillacum (The whining, gasfumed, presstitutes are following Sarah's bus.)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Sunflowers to clean radioactive soil in Japan

Campaigners in Japan are asking people to grow sunflowers, said to help decontaminate radioactive soil, in response to the Fukushima nuclear disaster that followed March’s massive quake and tsunami.
Volunteers are being asked to grow sunflowers this year, then send the seeds to the stricken area where they will be planted next year to help get rid of radioactive contaminants in the plant’s fallout zone.

The campaign, launched by young entrepreneurs and civil servants in Fukushima prefecture last month, aims to cover large areas in yellow blossoms as a symbol of hope and reconstruction and to lure back tourists.

“We will give the seeds sent back by people for free to farmers, the public sector and other groups next year,” said project leader Shinji Handa. The goal is a landscape so yellow that “it will surprise NASA”, he said.

The massive earthquake and tsunami left more than 23,000 people dead or missing on Japan’s northeast coast and crippled the Fukushima nuclear power plant that has leaked radiation into the environment since.

Almost 10,000 packets of sunflower seeds at 500 yen ($6) each have so far been sold to some 30,000 people, including to the city of Yokohama near Tokyo, which is growing sunflowers in 200 parks, Handa said.

Handa — who hails from Hiroshima, hit by an atomic bomb at the end of World War II — said the sunflower project was a way for people across the nation to lend their support to the disaster region.

“This is different from donations because people will grow the flowers, and a mother can tell her children that it is like an act of prayer for the reconstruction of the northeast,” Handa said.

“I also hope the project will give momentum to attract tourists back to Fukushima with sunflower seeds in their hands. I would like to make a maze using sunflowers so that children can play in it.”

http://www.breitbart.com/print.php?id=CNG.ea298a6179f170db0cbddba5974710a6.1c1&show_article=1


34 posted on 06/24/2011 8:08:46 AM PDT by Dacula (Just say no to Vidalia onions)
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To: tubebender

What sort of mulch are your strawberries resting on?


35 posted on 06/24/2011 8:15:53 AM PDT by Ladysforest
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To: tillacum; Red_Devil 232
I’ve never heard of chinese parsley. Is it a flat leaf, a strong flavor?

It's cilantro.

36 posted on 06/24/2011 8:16:52 AM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: tubebender

Your garden is magnificent. Are you trying to make all of us feel incompetent?

When did you plant your potatoes?

I’m growing the same varieties. I planted mine about 3 weeks ago, but they are not up as high as yours. The Yukon golds are growing must faster than the Red LaSoda.


37 posted on 06/24/2011 8:19:03 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: tubebender

I just came in from helping my tomatoe flowers put out more fruit.

Everytime I see a picture of your and Mrs. Bender’s garden, I envy you. Your gardens look so productive and you have done so much to improve everything. I’ve noticed you use a lot of wire over some of your produce. To keep out critters and birds?


38 posted on 06/24/2011 8:20:33 AM PDT by tillacum (The whining, gasfumed, presstitutes are following Sarah's bus.)
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To: IM2MAD; All

I like your idea. Earlier this spring we repurposed some old bicycle wheels. We cut the rubber tire off,scrubbed the metal “rims” and painted them black. Then we planted them in a row, largest to smallest with a peony in between. They extend out from the very large metal wagon wheels that flank the path from the front porch to the road. yesterday my little girl and I screwed plant pots to the wood posts that support the wagon wheels and planted wave petunias (she required pink flowers for her help in this project). I don’t know anything about posting pics but it looks pretty neat and makes a “fence” of sorts.


39 posted on 06/24/2011 8:23:35 AM PDT by madamemayhem (defeat is not getting knocked down, it is not getting back up.)
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To: Gabz

Oh, thank you.


40 posted on 06/24/2011 8:23:56 AM PDT by tillacum (The whining, gasfumed, presstitutes are following Sarah's bus.)
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To: Red_Devil 232
The rain did much more good than I can say, for my garden and pea patch, as well as our row crops on the farm. We had been irrigating everything and you could have purchased a new SUV with the diesel fuel bill I paid last month.
41 posted on 06/24/2011 8:25:28 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies. Plan it.)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

I can’t diagnose from your description, but I have my suspicions. When you post a photo, I’ll try to help.


42 posted on 06/24/2011 8:28:05 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies. Plan it.)
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To: tillacum

it’s cilantro. Yes, the leaves are flat and have a strong flavor for salsa. the seeds are know as coriander. They have a lemony flavor.


43 posted on 06/24/2011 8:29:14 AM PDT by madamemayhem (defeat is not getting knocked down, it is not getting back up.)
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To: Red_Devil 232
We missed some big storms last weekend and only got hit hard once. It's been dry for 3 days and garden should be looking good. Garden is holding up surprisingly well, got lots of work to do though.

Random pics!:

Blue Podded Capucinjers Pea. Soup pea with nice looking flowers and unique colored pods)

Golden Sweet Pea. Fresh/soup pea with yellow pods (more yellow than looks in the pic).

Left to right: Hulless Oats, Awnless Barley, Glenn Spring Wheat, and Winter Rye. Montana Winter Wheat just out of the pic, which the deer got. And yes, weeds.

Je.rusalem Artichokes.

Bumblebee on some sweet clover.

Honeybee hanging off an alfalfa flower.

A black-winged, blue bodies dragonfly which I've never seen around here before.

44 posted on 06/24/2011 9:09:53 AM PDT by Free Vulcan (Vote Republican! You can vote Democrat when you're dead.)
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To: tillacum

How do you “help your tomatoe flowers put out more fruit?” With an electric toothbrush? (That’s what a local tomato farmer around here told me to do for better pollination.)


45 posted on 06/24/2011 9:16:57 AM PDT by goodnesswins (...both islam and the democrat plantation thrive on poverty)
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To: Red_Devil 232
Critters are eating my tomatoes off the vine. The affected tomatoes are at ground level and inside cages. They were cut with precision as if someone took a knife and sliced off a slab. There lots of chipmunks and rabbits in my yard. I suspect it is chipmunks since rabbits can't get inside the cages.

Does anyone have any recommendations? I am fixing to go to the nursery to get some blood meal, but we are now hitting a spell of thunderstorms every day (praise God), so I don't know how long the blood meal will last.

Come to find out, chipmunks are a protected species here in Georgia, so I can't shoot them.

46 posted on 06/24/2011 9:25:25 AM PDT by Hoodat (Yet in all these things we are more than conquerors through Him who loved us. - (Rom 8:37))
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To: chickpundit

Just my two cents; I would stick with it. I put my first in-the-ground garden in this year. I have use of one of those big 6 foot heavy duty tillers I put on my tractor. I could not believe the amount of rocks that came up. I went through with a wheelbarrow and to out anything fist size or larger. Must have been 8 loads. I went ahead and planted. Now when I till between the rows, I take a 5 gallon bucket and take out the smaller rocks. It will probably take two to three years to get almost all of them out but it will be worth it in the end. If you live in an area with kids, you could always bribe them with money to form a picket line and go through your garden tossing out the rocks. My back wishes I had that option.


47 posted on 06/24/2011 9:30:56 AM PDT by ConservativeOrBust
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To: madamemayhem

I used coriander for years in sweet dough for chala etc and didn’t know the plant was cilantro until I came to Texas. lol.


48 posted on 06/24/2011 9:55:53 AM PDT by tillacum (The whining, gasfumed, presstitutes are following Sarah's bus.)
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To: madamemayhem

What a grand idea, this fall I’ll put one on a pole, tie strings to it and let the peas climb up and around. It would work well with a bushy ramabling rose. Thanks for the idea. Now I can go nuts with the wheels.


49 posted on 06/24/2011 9:58:28 AM PDT by tillacum (The whining, gasfumed, presstitutes are following Sarah's bus.)
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To: goodnesswins

I did do that with a dowl, just give little love pats. This a.m. I sprayed the flowers with bloom set. I even sprayed some on hubby’s okra.


50 posted on 06/24/2011 10:02:26 AM PDT by tillacum (The whining, gasfumed, presstitutes are following Sarah's bus.)
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