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RAF Spitfire pulled from Irish peat bog
Telegraph.co.UK ^ | Jun 29. 2011

Posted on 07/04/2011 11:05:25 AM PDT by KeyLargo

RAF Spitfire pulled from Irish peat bog

A Second World War RAF Spitfire has been excavated from an Irish peat bog almost 70 years after it crash-landed. A piece of the Wreckage of the World War Two spitire that crashed into the Bog in County Donegal

A piece of the Wreckage of the World War Two spitire that crashed into the Bog in County Donegal 6:00AM BST 29 Jun 2011

Six machine guns and about 1,000 rounds of ammunition were also discovered by archaeologists searching the Inishowen Peninsula in Co Donegal.

The British fighter plane was piloted by an American, Roland "Bud" Wolf, who parachuted safely from the aircraft before it crashed in the bog in November 1941.

The excavation was carried out as part of a BBC Northern Ireland programme.

Historian Dan Snow said: "The plane itself is obviously kind of wreckage and the big pieces survived. We're expecting to find things like the engine and there still may be personal effects in the cockpit.

"It's just incredible because it's just so wet here that the ground just sucked it up and the plane was able to burrow into it and it's been preserved.

(Excerpt) Read more at telegraph.co.uk ...


TOPICS: AMERICA - The Right Way!!; History; Military/Veterans; Reference
KEYWORDS: aerospace; aviationpinglist; germany; ireland; pilot; pow; spitfire; worldwareleven; ww2
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"Landing on neutral soil, the 23-year-old pilot was interned at Curragh detention camp in Co Kildare for two years.

When freed he joined the US Army Air Force and served in Korea and Vietnam. He died in 1994. "

Spitfire Recovery Unearths Unique Story

An RAF Spitfire flown by American pilot Roland "Bud" Wolfe dug itself deep into an Irish hillside on Nov. 30, 1941, after he bailed out, and now, 70 years later, that aircraft has been recovered. The recovery effort included an aviation historian, a team of archaeologists and the BBC, and will serve as the subject of a documentary. According to the Derry Journal, a newspaper from the town where the aircraft had been based, Wolfe had joined the RAF before America's official entry into the war and lost his U.S. citizenship because of it. He'd been flying on patrol near the north coast of Ireland when his engine began to rapidly overheat and he bailed out. Wolfe was detained by members of the Local Defence Force and held by the Irish Army, but escaped on Dec. 13, leading to what may be an even more unusual story.

http://www.avweb.com/eletter/archives/avflash/1945-full.html#204905

1 posted on 07/04/2011 11:05:30 AM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: Tijeras_Slim; FireTrack; Pukin Dog; citabria; B Knotts; kilowhskey; cyphergirl; Wright is right!; ..

AVIATION PING


2 posted on 07/04/2011 11:07:16 AM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: Tijeras_Slim; FireTrack; Pukin Dog; citabria; B Knotts; kilowhskey; cyphergirl; Wright is right!; ..

AVIATION PING


3 posted on 07/04/2011 11:14:15 AM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: KeyLargo

"hey, you hear they kicked out sum luittle spitfire named Raf off of some Irish kids blog named Pete"

4 posted on 07/04/2011 11:14:46 AM PDT by Doogle ((USAF.68-73..8th TFW Ubon Thailand..never store a threat you should have eliminated))
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To: zot

spitfire ping


5 posted on 07/04/2011 11:19:04 AM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: KeyLargo

The plane might have crashed or sunk into the bog but I don’t think it took it’s wheels and burrowed itself into it.


6 posted on 07/04/2011 11:19:29 AM PDT by bgill
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To: KeyLargo

There is only one flying Spit, and it is an ugly two seater. Any chance this one can be rebuilt?


7 posted on 07/04/2011 11:22:18 AM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: MindBender26

Sure, start with the original data plate and build all new around it.


8 posted on 07/04/2011 11:26:25 AM PDT by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: KeyLargo

An attempt to recover a Spitfire from a peat bog in Donegal will highlight the peculiar story of the men - both British and German - who spent much of World War II in relative comfort in neighbouring camps in Dublin, writes historian Dan Snow.

In Northern Ireland in 1941, a routine Sunday afternoon sortie by a pilot flying one of Britain’s Spitfire fighters runs into difficulties.

Returning to base after flying “top-cover” for maritime convoys off the coast of Donegal, the Rolls Royce Merlin engine overheats and fails.

The pilot yells into his radio “I’m going over the side”, slides back the bubble canopy, releases his seat straps and launches himself into the air.

The Spitfire is one of the most vaunted examples of British engineering’s history. The greatest ever single-seat, piston-engined fighter, it had played a vital role during the Battle of Britain the year before.

Its design was so advanced that it served on the front line from the first to the last day of the war. Bailing out was no easy task.

The air flow hit this particular pilot like a freight train and tore off his boots. Luckily he was able to deploy his parachute and landed in a peat bog. His aircraft smashed into the bog half a mile away.

It sounds like a typical wartime accident but it was anything but. It was the beginning of one of the strangest incidents of WWII.

Bud Wolfe was very keen to get back into action The pilot was 23-year-old Roland “Bud” Wolfe, an RAF officer from 133 “Eagle” Squadron, a unit entirely composed of Americans.

Bud himself was from Nebraska, one of a number of Americans who had volunteered to take up Britain’s cause. Since the US was not yet at war with Germany when the men volunteered, the American government stripped Wolfe and others of their citizenship. These pilots were a mix of idealists and thrill seekers.

When Wolfe was found by the authorities he realised his, already unusual, situation was much more complicated than he had guessed. He had crashed over the border.

Since the South was neutral it had been decided that all servicemen of any belligerent nation that ended up on Irish soil through navigational error, shipwreck or other accident would be interned for the duration of the war.

Wolfe found himself heading not back to his airbase, RAF Eglinton, now City of Derry Airport, in Northern Ireland just 13 miles away, but to Curragh Camp, County Kildare, 175 miles to the south.

Here, a huddle of corrugated iron huts housed 40 other RAF pilots and crewmen who had accidentally come down in neutral territory. They were effectively prisoners of war.

It was an odd existence. The guards had blank rounds in their rifles, visitors were permitted (one officer shipped his wife over), and the internees were allowed to come and go. Fishing excursions, fox hunting, golf and trips to the pub in the town of Naas helped pass the time.

But what was really odd was the proximity of the Germans.

It was not just the British and their allies who got lost above and around Ireland. German sailors from destroyed U-boats and Luftwaffe aircrew also found themselves interned. The juxtaposition of the two sides made for surreal drama.

Dublin stayed neutral in 1939 - it was only 18 years since it secured partial independence after centuries of British rule. Taoiseach Eamon de Valera even paid his respects to German representative in Dublin when news of Hitler’s death emerged. But Irish people were not all so impartial - a 2009 Edinburgh University study found more than 3,600 soldiers from the South died on active service
And in the British army alone, 100,000 Irish people served in WWII - half from the South.

Sport was a notable feature at the camp. In one football match the Germans beat the British 8-3. There were also boxing contests.

It appears that the rivalry on the pitch followed the teams into the pub afterwards as well. They would drink at different bars, and the British once complained vigorously when the Luftwaffe internees turned up to a dance they had organised.

Anything further from front-line service is hard to imagine.

It may seem to us like a welcome chance to sit out the war with honour intact, plenty of distractions and no danger, but for Wolfe it was an unacceptable interruption to his flying activities.

On 13 December 1941 he walked straight out of camp and after a meal in a hotel, which he did not pay for, he headed into nearby Dublin and caught the train the next day to Belfast. Within hours he was back at RAF Eglinton where he had taken off two weeks earlier in his defective Spitfire.

He could not have expected what was to happen next. The British government decided that, in this dark hour, it would be unwise to upset a neutral nation.

The decision was made to send Wolfe back to The Curragh and internment. Back in the camp, Wolfe made the best of it, joining the fox-hunting with relish.

He did try to escape again but this time he was caught. Finally in 1943, with the US in the war, and the tide slowly turning, The Curragh was closed and the internees returned. Wolfe joined the US Army Air Force and served once again on the front line.

So great was his love of flying that he also served in Korea and even Vietnam. He eventually died in 1994.


9 posted on 07/04/2011 11:28:32 AM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: MindBender26

There are way more than one spitfire flying.Check out the fighter collection at duxford england.


10 posted on 07/04/2011 11:35:33 AM PDT by HANG THE EXPENSE (Life is tough.It's tougher when you're stupid.)
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To: KeyLargo
lost his U.S. citizenship because of it.

Was his citizenship ever restored?

11 posted on 07/04/2011 11:35:37 AM PDT by reg45
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To: Yo-Yo

OH,THATS NEVER HAPPENED BEFORE.;)


12 posted on 07/04/2011 11:36:35 AM PDT by HANG THE EXPENSE (Life is tough.It's tougher when you're stupid.)
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To: KeyLargo
Submarine Spitfire

Peter Moss

13 posted on 07/04/2011 11:41:59 AM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open ( <o> ---)
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To: KeyLargo

Fantastic song that highlights British fliers.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Sam5omG0v0


14 posted on 07/04/2011 11:51:47 AM PDT by wastedyears (SEAL SIX makes me proud to have been playing SOCOM since 2003.)
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To: MindBender26

After the P-51 Mustang I suspect that the Supermarine Spitfire is the second most popular WW-II fighter

http://www.warbirdalley.com/spit.htm

Reagrds

alfa6 :>}


15 posted on 07/04/2011 12:03:45 PM PDT by alfa6
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To: alfa6
After the P-51 Mustang I suspect that the Supermarine Spitfire is the second most popular WW-II fighter

As Chuck Yeager wrote concerning performance evaluations of fighters, regardles of the plane, the better pilot generally came out on top.

. In 1948, the Israelis flying ME-109's swept the skies of Egyptian Spitfires.

16 posted on 07/04/2011 12:16:03 PM PDT by fso301
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To: KeyLargo

http://www.artistdirect.com/video/the-brylcreem-boys/57681


17 posted on 07/04/2011 12:17:37 PM PDT by Bringbackthedraft (The storm clouds of war are on the horizon, 1939 is again approaching us.)
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To: HANG THE EXPENSE

MOST COOL!


18 posted on 07/04/2011 12:37:04 PM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: smokingfrog

Pete Moss?


19 posted on 07/04/2011 12:44:10 PM PDT by KingLudd
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To: reg45

I’m sure it was; according to the Telegraph article, he joined the Army Air Corps after being freed (at last) from the internment camp. Sounds like he became a career Air Force officer, serving in both Korea and Vietnam.

During my own career in the USAF, I met a few NCOs who were foreign nationals (Filipinos and even a Brit), but I never knew an officer who wasn’t a U.S. citizen. I’m guessing his citizenship was restored once he became a member of the Air Corps. As I recall, there were American volunteers who took on Canadian citizenship to fly with the RAF and their Eagle squadrons. But they regained American citizenship when they accepted commissions with the U.S. military.


20 posted on 07/04/2011 12:46:33 PM PDT by ExNewsExSpook
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To: MindBender26
"There is only one flying Spit..."

Um, not quite...

16-ship Supermarine Spitfire formation from the Duxford Battle of Britain Air show 2010

21 posted on 07/04/2011 12:50:06 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: MindBender26

There are WAY more flying Spits, and nicer ones too. I have seen the ugly two seater at Oshkosh, but...Hell, I wouldn’t throw a two seater out of the rack for eating crackers in it!


22 posted on 07/04/2011 12:50:09 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." Gilbert K. Chesterton)
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To: reg45
“lost his U.S. citizenship because of it.
Was his citizenship ever restored?”

Neither he nor anyone else that flew for England, or the Flying Tigers for that matter, actually “lost” their citizenship. They were put into some kind of administrative limbo so that they could go fight for another country while we were officially “neutral.” One of the Flying Tigers (Tex Hill I think) talked about this process. Once we were offically in the war, all that business went away.

23 posted on 07/04/2011 1:04:19 PM PDT by I cannot think of a name
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To: MindBender26
There is only one flying Spit, and it is an ugly two seater. Any chance this one can be rebuilt?

I saw mention of a company on a PBS show, History Detectives, that was building World War II aircraft. They helped identify some parts from a Japanese aircraft that had crashed in Hawaii. They were building World War II aircraft from original spare parts or parts from aircraft that were unable to be fully rebuilt. When they showed the clip, they were working on building an entire B-17. Unfortunately a B-17 was lost recently.

There was a tank show on I think Discovery Channel, where they refurbish old tanks, and they mentioned a British company that was building World War II aircraft through mostly new parts, or at least the wings/fuselage were freshly machined. They were going by the original blueprints and working with some old RAF mechanics.
24 posted on 07/04/2011 1:11:42 PM PDT by af_vet_rr
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To: MindBender26

“There is only one flying Spit, and it is an ugly two seater. Any chance this one can be rebuilt?”

Really? Just one Spit? I had no idea. That’s really sad (I guess the two seater was trainer).


25 posted on 07/04/2011 1:27:04 PM PDT by WKUHilltopper (And yet...we continue to tolerate this crap...)
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To: MindBender26

Forgotten Spitfire will fly again after major restoration
A project to create the most authentic flying Mark I Spitfire will be completed later this year when aircraft X4650 takes to the skies 70 years after the Battle of Britain.

By Alastair Jamieson

9:00PM BST 24 Jul 2010

The painstaking reconstruction of aircraft X4650 coincides with a public competition to design a permanent memorial to the aircraft’s designers.

It also shines a spotlight on the extraordinary story of young pilot Howard Squire who was flying the plane on a training mission led by RAF legend ‘Al’ Deere when the pair collided over North Yorkshire.

Sgt Squire, now 89, has visited the restoration project and hopes to see the finished aircraft fly over the south coast of England later this year.

Those involved in the project believe X4650 will be the most accurately-rebuilt Mark I Spitfire in the skies and will contain the highest number of original parts.

The wreckage was only discovered in the long, hot summer of 1976 when low river levels exposed the metal embedded in a clay riverbank on farmland near Kirklevington, Cleveland.
Related Articles

It had been there since December 28 1940, after Sgt Squire, then 20, bailed out after colliding with X4276 flown by Al Deere, Flight Commander of 54 Squadron at RAF Catterick.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/world-war-2/battle-of-britain/7908245/Forgotten-Spitfire-will-fly-again-after-major-restoration.html


26 posted on 07/04/2011 1:35:30 PM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: rlmorel

Y2K Spitfire Restoration Project

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G9Z9SMn7Dg4


27 posted on 07/04/2011 1:41:46 PM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: af_vet_rr

Comox Air Force Museum Volunteers Speak Up About the Y2K Spitfire

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kAVibDCKRhQ


28 posted on 07/04/2011 1:47:46 PM PDT by KeyLargo
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To: WKUHilltopper

I was wrong about just one. There are more, thank goodness.


29 posted on 07/04/2011 2:09:19 PM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: WKUHilltopper

I was wrong about just one. There are more, thank goodness.


30 posted on 07/04/2011 2:09:25 PM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: Joe 6-pack

I was wrong.

Thank you for that information. I might give my “left one” for some Spitfire time.

P.S. I have 1.6 in the Goodyear Blimp. It was like flying a 500 foot-long waterbed


31 posted on 07/04/2011 2:15:33 PM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: HANG THE EXPENSE; Joe 6-pack; rlmorel; WKUHilltopper

You are right. There are at least 16, thank goodness.


32 posted on 07/04/2011 2:19:38 PM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: MindBender26
If I'm not mistaken, David Gilmour of Pink Floyd owned one at one time maybe still does). He's an antique aviation aficionado, and at one time had opened his own museum, but I think it has subsquently folded.

The song, "Learning To Fly" makes a lot more sense when listened to in that context ;-)

33 posted on 07/04/2011 2:20:14 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: MindBender26
Here is a great looking late model Spit I saw probably around 2000:

This was one of my favorite years, when they had a boatload of Corsairs there, I think there was between eight and twelve of them:

You can see I was loaded for bear...not gonna miss anything there...I am wearing the japanese soldier looking hat because it was so damned hot that year, you couldn't get out of the sun. Every shadow EVERYWHERE was completely filled with people, under planes, even in the two-foot shadows of buildings at high-noon, people were shoulder to shoulder, backs on the wall. That sucked...

34 posted on 07/04/2011 3:39:48 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." Gilbert K. Chesterton)
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To: Joe 6-pack

I don’t know about him, but Roger Waters sucks rat bags.


35 posted on 07/04/2011 3:41:57 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." Gilbert K. Chesterton)
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To: rlmorel

Oshkosh?


36 posted on 07/04/2011 3:44:12 PM PDT by MindBender26 (Forget AMEX. Remember your Glock 27: Never Leave Home Without It!)
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To: rlmorel

Married?


37 posted on 07/04/2011 3:57:40 PM PDT by Amberdawn
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To: MindBender26

Indeed, I haven’t been in a few years, but I try to get out there every three years or so!


38 posted on 07/04/2011 4:40:45 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." Gilbert K. Chesterton)
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To: Amberdawn

I sure am, to a wonderful woman who lets me go out there for a week and do my own thing...she understands how important that can be.

I was wondering why you asked, and then thought “Must be because I am flashing my hand...and no ring!” But then I realized it wasn’t my ring hand...:)

I am a lucky guy. She is an independent woman who doesn’t need me to entertain her (though she confides that sometimes I DO entertain her...but I am not sure she means it as a compliment...:)

I just wish she was as conservative as I am, but she isn’t a real liberal either, so I can deal with that. We have common ground in that area...:)


39 posted on 07/04/2011 4:46:53 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." Gilbert K. Chesterton)
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To: MindBender26

A friend of mine, Nelson Whiteman, had a fully restored Spitfire given to him by his father when he returned from Korea.

I haven’t seen him in 50 years but Unless he crashed it i’m sure it is still in existance at Whiteman Airpark in No. Hollywood, California.


40 posted on 07/04/2011 4:49:20 PM PDT by dalereed
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To: rlmorel

I had kind of a sucky, yet funny experience that year (It wasn’t fun, but in retrospect, it was funny)

I had a new pair of sneakers I was wearing, and my feet got so sweaty on day one I couldn’t stand it. The next day, I powdered down my feet, something I have never done.

My feet got blistered and bloody (doing a lot of walking at Oshkosh on concrete) and my buddy said that he saw me walking towards him, bowlegged trying to walk on the outside of my feet and limping badly, and he said my hat and gait made me look like some Japanese POW limping towards the Marines to surrender...


41 posted on 07/04/2011 4:51:36 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." Gilbert K. Chesterton)
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To: dalereed

I hate hearing those stories about being able to buy a surplus fighter plane for $1000 after WWII...argh. I can’t stand it. It is torture. I can live with buying 500 shares of Apple stock when it was $12 and having my wife sell it for me when it got to $25, but I grit my teeth when I hear about those fighters being fed into shredders or sold for a thousand bucks.


42 posted on 07/04/2011 4:56:14 PM PDT by rlmorel ("Tolerance is the virtue of the man without convictions." Gilbert K. Chesterton)
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To: KeyLargo

I do believe they’re still short two Browning .303s.


43 posted on 07/04/2011 6:16:00 PM PDT by Grut
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To: MindBender26
Wow!!

Never heard of that story before....

Thanks!

44 posted on 07/04/2011 6:36:42 PM PDT by Osage Orange (MOLON LABE)
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To: GreyFriar

Thanks for the spitfire ping.


45 posted on 07/04/2011 8:16:37 PM PDT by zot
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To: rlmorel

SIGH.......


46 posted on 07/04/2011 9:34:03 PM PDT by Amberdawn
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To: alfa6
The P-51 Mustang was a superior aircraft to the Spitfire in the design of its airframe and performance with a good engine. It had a “piece of crap” for an engine.”

When the P-51 was fitted with the Merlin Super Marine engine from Rolls Royce the best airframe and best engine made history. The Rolls Royce engine was also produced in the United States under license of Rolls Royce.

However, as lovely as the P-51 is, when you see a Spit do a chandel there is no question as to the beauty of the Spit.

47 posted on 07/04/2011 10:23:03 PM PDT by cpdiii (Deckhand, Roughneck, Geologist, Pilot, Pharmacist, Iconoclast: THE CONSTITUTION IS WORTH DYING FOR.)
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To: alfa6
After the P-51 Mustang I suspect that the Supermarine Spitfire is the second most popular WW-II fighter

Not in Germany.

48 posted on 07/10/2011 6:17:49 PM PDT by archy (I'd give my right arm to be ambidextrous!)
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To: cpdiii
Packard motors built the Merlin under license from rolls royce. They made so many of them that the US was shipping them back to the UK for their domestic aircraft production.What made this swap possible were the nearly identical dimensions and weights between the merlin and the Allison V12. BTW, Allison is still in business as a division of General motors. They make commercial and industrial application vehicle transmissions.

CC

49 posted on 07/12/2011 5:26:32 AM PDT by Celtic Conservative (Wisdom comes from experience. Experience comes from a lack of wisdom.)
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To: MindBender26

Really?

http://www.vintagewings.ca/Aircraft/tabid/66/articleType/ArticleView/articleId/1/language/en-CA/Supermarine-Spitfire-XVI.aspx


50 posted on 07/12/2011 5:38:01 AM PDT by mad_as_he$$
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